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224

I've had success with Sysinternals Process Explorer. With this, you can search to find what process(es) have a file open, and you can use it to close the handle(s) if you want. Of course, it is safer to close the whole process. Exercise caution and judgement. To find a specific file, use the menu option "Find->Find Handle or DLL..." Type in part of the ...


72

unlocker is also useful for this (works on both 32 and 64 bit)


58


35

Just be very careful with closing handles; it's even more dangerous than you'd think, because of handle recycling - if you close the file handle, and the program opens something else, that original file handle you closed may be reused for that "something else." And now guess what happens if the program continues, thinking it is working on the file (whose ...


23

I've used Handle with success to find such processes in the past.


21

You really would be better off setting up a pair of nameservers if you can. I've never really seen a situation where you couldn't replace a cumbersome hosts file situation with a couple of DNS servers (Really, they are easy to setup and run). However, to answer your question, you can use something like either puppet or cfengine to keep these in sync. ...


16

Dominic D's explanation of what is going on is correct: Vista, Windows7, and Windows2008 r2 use NTLMv2 by default. Older implementations of Samba don't support this and will return a password failure. Fortunately you can tell Vista and Windows 7 (and I presume Server 2k8) to use the v1 protocol if the v2 is not available. These are my notes for Vista, they ...


11

Windows7 and Windows2008 r2 use NTLMv2 by default. Older implementations of Samba don't support this and will return a password failure. We had this exact same problem on our NAS. Two solutions Bug your NAS vendor to update their implementation (we've just received a patch). Push a policy change either via GPO or via Local Policy. The setting you ...


10

This should work so long as the account you run the scheduled task using has correct access to the network share where the bat file is located. Depending on what the script does, I'd stagger the run times by department. You only need a minute or two of variance to minimize the odds of a staggering hit right at 12. Regarding the commenter above who mentions ...


8

For Windows 7 and Windows 8 you can use the built-in Resource Monitor for this. Open Resource Monitor, which can be found By searching in the start menu, or As a button on the Performance tab in your Task Manager Use the search field in the Associated Handles section on the CPU tab Pointed at by blue arrow in screen shot below In case it's not ...


6

Github is commonly used for this sort of thing as is bitbucket.


5

There are several powershell repositories: http://poshcode.org/ The TechNet script center: http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/ScriptCenter/ You may get better exposure there since the audience is powershell focused


5

Having batch file will work but consider limitations such as having appropriate permission and admin requirements. You may consider deploying it as Logon Script thru Active Directory.


5

The problem you have is that to get duplexing and other features, you need to use the native features of the print driver. Things like ghostscript will get you the basic printing features, but to get more advanced features, you really need a proper driver for the printer.


4

I don't understand what you mean by sharing files in localhost, since localhost is by definition the local machine. What are you attempting to do with /net ? Is it an NFS mount-point? To enable file sharing in OS X, go to the Apple menu (top left of every screen) and select System Preferences > Sharing, and enable File Sharing on the target machine (i.e., ...


4

You can stop the "Server" service. This is going to stop the "Netlogon" and "Computer Browser" services, too. (On a domain controller computer, stopping the "Netlogon" service can potentially cause problems with client computers being able to allow logons with domain acconts.) If this is something you want to do long-term, you might be better off to rename ...


4

What you have actually looks correct. You have the setgid bit set on the directory, so new files created should inherit the staff group. They do still remain owned by the creator, though. I suspect the problem is that the umask for your users is defaulting to 022 or even 077, which means new files they create will not have the group-write permission by ...


4

Who Lock Me works well and keeps people amused with the name!


4

I've tried some, but was never more satisfied as with Synergy


4

I'd recommend plugging it into the network with the network socket, allocating it a fixed IP, then creating a print queue on the server that points to the printer. Clients can then connect to the queue on the server (via a nice friendly network name), and they'll have the correct drivers served automatically (assuming this is a windows server). You'll be ...


4

Why would you imagine it might error out? Each workstation simply reads the file and executes its commands. Provided your server is real server and not just a workstation pretending to be a server there will be no issue. The only thing you need to keep in mind is that a batch file is read and executed one command at a time. Therefore, if you were to make a ...


4

It sounds like file and printer sharing may be turned off. To turn it back on for an OS previous to Vista, go HERE. To change it for Windows 7 & Vista, look HERE.


3

You need to initiate the VPN connection at your gateway, which is the device that provides your internet connection. Entry-level and home devices generally don't permit this, so you'll need a mid-level device, or flash your device with a new firmware if you can (such as tomato or dd-wrt). There are also entire OS's dedicated to firewalling that you could ...


3

To me this sounds like a concurrent connection limit on the modem itself. Most of these devices are capable of handing 512 concurrent connections. In my experience it usually takes 10-20 people to eat that up depending on the type of browsing that is occurring. If there is any peer-to-peer activity this will be consumed much faster. Check the status page of ...


3

I believe it works fine. But reality is better so let me say we use a .cmd file as our logon script. It is centrally hosted on a server and accessed by 6-800 PCs every morning during login. We've never seen an issue with multiple accesses to the script at once.


3

I would expect the answer to be yes. The company I work at has a batch file that runs from a network fileshare that runs as every machine starts up. If there were any problems of the type you expect in your question then the batch file would fail reasonably regularly but as far as I am aware it works every time.


3

If it's all Mac, AFP... SMB/CIFS is fine as well.


3

Look at Teamviewer, I've used it for years and they have many different settings depending on needs (Meetings, File Shareing, etc.) Hope this helps and DFTBA. :)


3

Posting a link as an answer is frowned upon but the question is really a very novice Windows question. http://blogs.technet.com/b/keithmayer/archive/2012/10/21/ntfs-shared-folders-a-whole-lot-easier-in-windows-server-2012.aspx#.UkGdqz_-Vi4 You can follow that guide for 2012 and be just fine. Sharing a drive/folder/path usually follows: share the ...


3

I would seriously consider talking this client out of an in-house solution. For 5 users it is overkill. With the rise of hosted Exchange solutions, there are a number of reasons to use hosted Exchange (or other hosted solutions such as Google Apps): Security: Chances are that a professional company with teams of administrators will be able to keep the ...



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