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1

I don't have a Solaris system to hand but it appears that the script is relying on /bin/sh being a link to /bin/bash and as such is using bash syntax that sh doesn't understand. As you've discovered changing the shebang to #!/bin/bash fixes the problem. You should submit a bug report and hopefully the maintainers will fix it to be less Linux centric.


0

you can also use find command. We’ll use this in order to figure out what files are older than a certain number of days, and then use the rm command to delete them. find <path of file> -typf f -mtime +0 -exec rm {} \; it will delete files which are dated yesterday.


0

The latest version of the Unix tail command supports multiple -f as shown below. tail -f /var/log/proccess1.log -f /var/log/proccess2.log


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ssh reads stdin unless you provide the -n option. So, the first IP address is consumed by read IP and all the rest of the here-doc is consumed by ssh root@10.0.0.10. Change that to ssh -n root@10.0.0.10


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You should send to the remote server the script to be executed. The way your script is written will not work because the here_doc is evaluated locally, not remotely. Take a look on this answer I provided to another user on this subject.


4

Cron does not actually guarantee execution times. It works on a "best effort" model. Although it would like it to run once a minute, it will try as hard as it can to do so, but may decide every once and a while (for various resource-related reasons) that it just can't get to it at that moment, and may push it to it's next cycle. In addition, Cron won't even ...


1

Another way to follow multiple files is to use multitail. multitail /var/log/proccess1.log /var/log/proccess2.log Among its features: filtering highlighting automatic and manual mark lines


1

You can display multiple dialogs with --and-widget. Try something like: dialog --begin 1 1 --tailboxbg FILE1 10 100 --and-widget --begin 20 1 --tailbox FILE2 10 100



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