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1

No, there is no way at this time to connect two Virtual Private Gateways in different regions. I'm sure it's a feature that's coming, given the VPC peering is available for VPCs in a single region. As for "You are responsible for implementing HA solutions for all VPN endpoints (if required)", I discussed in a previous answer there are various techniques for ...


2

Yes, UDP over a VPN is possible, but no, that wouldn't change a thing. Although the underlying transport may be reliable, the UDP has been designed not to retransmit lost packets. If you really have a problem with packetloss, either switch to TCP for transport, fix it by making the application send UDP packets slower, or increase the bandwidth on the path ...


2

This fully depends why and where the packet loss is. Some examples: Your ISP "optimizes" the traffic and downgrades your UDP traffic. In this case a VPN would help unless the ISP downgrades also the VPN traffic. You don't have enough bandwidth to handle the traffic. In this case a VPN would not help.


0

It seems you've run into the conundrum of bad Fortinet jargon. You want to NAT the source IP of IPsec packets? Oh... that'll be the Local Gateway Address. Jokes aside, it seems that your config is good, except for that darn IPsec NAT setting. Given: Internal src address => IPsec packets (qualified by src/dst) ~~ NATed to a public IP => ISP router ...


2

The speed/throughput may be some external factor, as EEAA mentions. But in general, when I've needed to provide remote access across long distance links (Chicago-Hong Kong or London-Seoul), RDP was not an option. Latency kills you at those distances... Do you have the option to use something that's a bit better with high-latency long-distance links? Citrix ...



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