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The simplest way (yet secure) to implement a IPSec VPN is by using IKEv1 in Main Mode (you can see the scenarios to use aggressive mode). So, assuming you are trying to use IKEv1 Main Mode: First of all, IKEv1 phase 1 must be negotiated. IPSec only will be negoatiated after phase 1 is OK. (Phase 1 is also called ISAKMP). To negotiate phase 1, you need to ...


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If you have multiple VPNs you might run into the issue that when they connect in random order, their interface IDs change. In that case the normal ROUTE -P ADD 10.0.0.0 MASK 255.255.0.0 10.0.0.1 IF 42 does not work. The next time the VPN connects it might have a different interface number. Powershell has a cmdlet available that adds routes on VPN connection ...


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If you have two OpenVPN capable routers, set one of them to connect to the other to create a LAN-to-LAN VPN. In your case, there is no need to install OpenVPN software on the PCs UNLESS you don't want to do LAN-to-LAN. In that case, you'll only use the OpenVPN software on ONE of the routers, and use the OpenVPN client software on the remote PC. I'm not sure ...


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If the packet come thru the WAN's port you have no choice but to activate the setting. (Enable management via WAN) If the packet is seen from a LAN's port, but only from another subnet you need to define those subnet in the sonicwall, and to make allow rule for them. See that picture for an actual example; nb. You miss a network diagram to help


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A Microsoft employee was kind enough to post a script for creating a point-to-site VPN using Azure Resource Manager model. The feature is undocumented at this time, but this script did the trick for me! (Original Post) # Must created a subnet called GatewaySubnet for the gateway to connect prior to creating the gateway $vnetname = "TestNetwork" $rgname = ...



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