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7

Back in the old days we would do backups using "dd" of the entire disk. Therefore, we had the "c" slice so that we could do it all with one command. That's why the "c" slice exists. DD isn't perfect. If a disk is only 10% full you spend 90% of your time copying blocks that are "junk" or (for example) are used for "swap" (useless to be backed up). "dd" ...


6

Assuming you're running a recent release, when you get the disklabel setup simply type: D - this blanks the disklabels a b - Give the desired size of your swap partition a a - Assign the rest to / Folders and such are created automatically for you by the installer.


4

As your Question says that this is for a testing configuration, I'd say Go for it! Not dealing with the vagaries of which partitioning scheme is optimal, can really save you time and disk space (e.g. that 5G you partitioned for /etc is wasted space when you've only got 10G or less to play with.) OpenBSD works just fine with a single slice for working with, ...


4

It's a result of the slices traditionally being laid out as follows: s0: root s1: swap s2: bkup They assigned the most important thing to the first slice and continued with decreasing importance :) (Who needs swap if you have no root partition? Further, who needs to backup anything if you have no data.) I don't know when exactly this was decided upon ...


3

When you run the OpenBSD installer, simply delete the other slices at the disklabel step, leaving just a and b. The installer will still create the other directories; they just won't be as securely protected. (For example, normally OpenBSD sets things like nodev for /home; when on the same volume as /, which houses the /dev directory, this is no longer ...


2

Couple thoughts: There's no way to expand a BSD Slice to two physical locations on a disk (the new space on your disk is only at the end, slices that aren't at the end can't be expanded to that new space). I don't know of a tool that can move slices, but I'd be surprised if one didn't exist. You don't need var on a separate partition. The clunky old ...


2

It does seem like your host is giving you the run-around. Most likely, you'll have to have the two VPS's going for about 2 days. The first day to port your application (barring no serious issues), and the second, to give time for dns records to be updated to the new VPS. If you do go this route, I'd try setting up a local 8.10 server and do a test run of ...


2

I think 2 hours would be pushing it, it took me a couple of days when i moved webserver and there was also the time it took to shift my domain to the new server. I think you should talk to slice host about this, they should be more willing to help you upgrade. I am sure you aren't the only customer in this situation.


2

There is no reason you should be down at all. Set your DNS TTL low (30 min or lower if you can), and do it ahead of time. Get the second slice. Install/port your software to it, and have it staged and ready to go. Change your DNS. Within the TTL period, users that already had your old IP will still go to the old slice. New users will go to the new slice. ...


2

I'm have a VPS on slicehost myself, and they've never upgraded the dist for me. I'm not totally sure why they suggested a new slice to do the upgrades. What I've done with my slice since Ubuntu 6 something, is just update the sources list, and upgrade up one step at a time. Like jldugger mentioned, you have to upgrade to 8.04 before going to 8.10.


1

check disk slices: fdisk /dev/xx Part status: geom part status


1

More information about this question: According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BSD_disklabel on FreeBSD the c partition on a disk that is also in use by other operating systems will only extend onto the entire FreeBSD slice, and partition d would be the entire hard drive! The c partition addresses the entire disk in dedicated mode, or the entire ...


1

I really wouldn't recommend attempting to create an install without a seperate /home partition. Having a separate home partition has massive advantages when correcting problems , backing up and restoring or reinstalling the entire system.



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