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28

While S.M.A.R.T. certainly doesn't predict all failures, I worked in a computer repair shop for several years, and many times a S.M.A.R.T. error message was the first indication that a failure was about to occur, allowing me to save the customer's data before the drive died. The technology itself does not stress the drive, it just keeps track of a number ...


20

Yes, they have it, and yes, it's useful. Flash drives do develop errors over time, usually in the form of bad flash blocks - not unlike bad sectors in regular hard drives. Just like regular hard drives, the drive controller keeps track of these bad blocks and re-maps them to 'extra' blocks that were saved for this purpose. Whenever the computer requests ...


18

Sounds very much like the drives are doing SMART scrubbing (automatic online testing). smartctl -a /dev/hdx should confirm the configuration with: Auto Offline Data Collection: Enabled. Disable with: smartctl --offlineauto=off /dev/hdx It could be something else too...


12

Drives, like most components, have a bathtub curve failure rate. They fail a lot in the beginning, have a relatively low failure rate in the middle, and then fail a lot as they reach the end of their life. Just as the whole drive follows this curve, particular areas of the disk will also follow this curve. You'll see a lot of sector re-allocations in the ...


11

Re-reading Google's paper on the subject, "Failure Trends in a Large Disk Drive Population", I think I can safely say that Adam's answer is incorrect. In their analysis of an extremely massive population of drives, roughly 9% had non-zero reallocation counts. The telling quote is this: After their first reallocation, drives are over 14 times more ...


10

A good, but not infallible, way of checking any drive health is to check the SMART attributes. Below is the SMART attribute set for an Intel X25-M G2 160GB disk, taken using smartctl v5.41. (The version is important, earlier versions of smartctl had different attribute-name mappings, and didn't actually correctly understand the specific table for this ...


9

I used to write disk firmware for WD, and I once wrote the firmware which reassigned bad blocks. First, most bad blocks are detected on reads, not writes. Writes are done blindly, meaning the data is written without being checked. Thus on a write if the media is bad, you won't know it until the host does a read to that sector. There is a small part of the ...


8

According to Steve Gibson of Spinrite fame, SMART values have to be taken over time, not as instantaneous readings. That means, a value of 47 isn't necessarily bad if the value has been 47 for months. However if the value was 42 an hour ago, and its climbing rapidly, then that means the drive is experiencing difficulty accessing part of the data and may soon ...


7

I'm not sure what you mean. You can ask the disk to run a (SMART) self-test. This usually takes some time, and is somewhat stressful for the disk. I'd not recommend to run it more than once in a long while. On the other hand, you can check the SMART status from the disk. In other words, this means "read the SMART meters from the disk". This operation is ...


7

The life of a controller battery on HP Smart Arrays is ~3 years. The purpose of the array battery is to provide power protection for the controller's write cache. The is a data protection mechanism that allows writes to the cache to be acknowledged by a lower-latency cache versus waiting on the underlying disks. Typically, failure of this battery ...


5

The check_ide_smart plugin is part of the standard nagios plugins group. Despite the "ide" part of the name, it uses smartctl to check any drive that smartctl supports. It can return nagios-suitable output, e.g: $ ./check_ide_smart -n -d /dev/sda OK - Operational (17/17 tests passed) Or the full SMART status: $ ./check_ide_smart -d /dev/sda Id= 1, ...


5

In my experience (20 years in operating servers, must have handled about 5.000 disks in all the servers I have dealt with) SMART is useful but no panacea. If you get SMART errors replace the disk asap. Chances hare very high that with 4-8 weeks the disk will have serious issues. (The Google study frequently mentioned in this regard correlates very nicely ...


5

This is SMART counter. Reallocated sectors are not exposed to the software. Physically, all drives have spare space reserve for reallocation, so, HDD is internally doing all the things, process is transparent to the outside world. While reallocated sector count is low enough - you don't have to worry about it, performance decrease won't be significant. ...


5

Not easily. the sector reallocation happens inside the drive (which is why it's reported to you by SMART) -- your filesystem has no clue it's happening. As far as it's concerned sector 12345 is still sector 12345, that's what it asks the drive for. Internally the drive knows 12345 is now 67890 and returns the contents of the remapped sector. The only way I ...


5

SMART overall-health self-assessment test result: FAILED! That part is not interpreted by smartctl (assuming I understand correctly, of course) - that drive has told smartctl that is isn't happy with its current state (for whatever reason) and smartctl is just echoing that warning to you. Even if it is misinterpreting the spin-up time reading, I don't ...


5

I had a spare drive that I can still boot from that fails SMART checks every boot and requires a soft reset, has for years, but it's just a dump, not a system disk! So although SMART errors can persist for a long time they should ALWAYS be heeded in production, as the risks heavily outweigh the cost, time and data integrity benefits. Google studied 100,00 ...


4

All drives are the same model and have been bought together. This is a ticking bomb. Based on both the message from SMART and the quote above, you should change disks right away. Since the drives have been bought together and are the same model, they will probably have the same weaknesses, and probably all fail simultaneously under the same ...


4

Maybe this will suit your needs: Quoted from this link: You'll need the SmartMonTools package and use *check_smart.pl* perl script (nagios plugin) to check hard drive health by running S.M.A.R.T. self-tests using the smartctl command, add to your snmpd.conf: exec CheckSmart /path/to/check_smart.pl -t -d /dev/hda


4

I would probably use nagios with passive checks if I could not set a nagios server on the remote network. On enterprise server hardware you can use tools like the insight manager (HP), opemange (dell) and have the passive checks query those tools. check_openmanage does that for dell servers and check_hpasm for HP hardware. With those tools you monitor all ...


4

Sending the HUP signal to smartd will cause it to reload the config without killing the daemon. Although, that doesn't help you in your quest for what you seek. You can't change the threshold values on a S.M.A.R.T. disk, as they're set by the manufacturer at build time. You will have to resort to a a cron job that polls the values using smartctl, and ...


4

I want to add to the comments in the other answer, but I can't due to lack of rep, go figure. You don't need to make a cron script, there is a smartd daemon in the smartmontools package that handles just what you want to do: regular checking of SMART status. All you need is to create a configuration and start the service. The smartmontools package also ...


4

Possibly the cause for significantly decreased performance would be the Automatic Acoustic Management (AAM) - check its status on both drives using hdparm -M and disable it entirely by setting the value to 254. Also, enabling the write cache on the drives using hdparm -W should be worth trying. Since you are using Caviar Green drives (which you should not ...


4

Do the replace if you can. On the other hand these are 'only' read errors which is not that bad. If you write to that sector then you can be only sure if it has defects. I would run the vendors utility to check (they also run smart tests) if it has problems. They usually make bootable cds available. You can and should run a self test which you can do from ...


4

I'd like to thank you for the advice and share some of the details that I've got from experiments. In short, there is no easy way to get the list of reallocated sectors and even statistical methods of mapping the disk are heavily encumbered by the need to play against the logic of the firmware. To test the drive I ran badblocks -wv with the default ...


4

In all seriousness... SMART is a predicated failure, there are tools you can find which will dive a little deeper and let you know what kind of failures it is detecting, there are quite a number of them. If this is a critical system, don't mess around. Start verifying/taking backups and procuring replacement physical disks.


4

Like I pointed out in my other answer, every modern hard drive has remapping space available (because especially at today's disk densities, no drive platter will be perfect - there will always be a few defects that the drive has to remap around, even on brand-new-never-been-used-came-off-the-assembly-line-into-my-hands drives). Because of this, ...


4

Congratulations, you've just had your first unrecoverable read error. sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Add. Sense: Unrecovered read error - auto reallocate failed This means the drive was unable to read from a sector of the disk, and in this case, was also unable to reallocate a good sector to take the place of the bad sector. A URE can cause the drive to appear failed ...


4

Dell Openmanage Server Administrator can show you the status of individual disks. If you have a 4e, that's likely a very old server, so I'm not sure if the OS/hardware combo that you have will actually support a modern version of Openmanage, but it's the typical answer to this type of question.


3

I agree with the sentiment about letting the storage array handle this. There are so many misconceptions about how to maintain and manage SSD storage... Treat them like disks in this case. RAID them. Have spares. Keep your support contract active. Profit. There's no need to preemptively replace your SSDs. If you have a write load that is truly write ...


3

What Dell has for this is the Dell Client Configuration Utility, which gives you the option to configure bios changes (either for a single model or multiple models, and whatever doesn't apply to that bios is skipped), and then package it in an msi for silent/unattended deployment to the workstation, a reboot is still required though. ...



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