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Ok well after a lot of frustration I reset the Draytek to factory settings and configured the VLAN section again, this time I only used LAN1 for subnets. Everything worked perfectly... I will be adding subnets soon to test as remote dial-in users will have to be isolated too but happy I got it working. Not sure what caused the strange behavious as I then ...


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Your SSDs are likely healthy, but the HP Smart Array P410 RAID controller is not compatible with every SSD. In particular, some SSDs report incorrect temperatures attributes to the controller that cause chassis fan and system thermal issues. In addition, any SATA device used on that controller will be downclocked to 3Gbps speeds from 6Gbps. So you're ...


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This is how I've done it before. There might be better ways. Get the PCI bus ID for the adapter from MegaCLI: /opt/MegaRAID/MegaCli/MegaCli64 -adpgetpciinfo -a0 | grep Bus Bus Number : 2 In this case, BUS=2. Then look through the PCI table for devices on that BUS, and look for the 'hostX' entry: ls /sys/bus/pci/devices/0000\:0${BUS}\:00.0/ | grep ...


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This is not a very good sign. You should make sure that the contents of the disk are backed up, and not use the disk for anything important. However, I have seen disks with failed sectors that reallocated them and remained operational for years, so you could keep it around for a while, e.g., for unimportant stuff, or additional backups. One thing to do ...


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Yes, you have 16 sectors unreadable, you have tried to do several tests that all have failed in roughly the same area of the drive, so, backup fast, but keep in mind that you have data already inaccessible by now lingering in the vicinity of sectors 92290592, 92290596. You may have other problematic areas, you still don't know if those 16 sectors are ...


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To answer your question, a failed SMART test is a surefire indication of imminent drive failure. You should back up your data and replace the drive as soon as possible to prevent potential data loss. @sj0h mentioned the Load Cycle Count, which is very high at 447,630. (Most modern hard drives are designed to withstand 600,000 load/unload cycles.) This is ...


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Apart from the read failures, consider also the Load Cycle Count. At nearly 500,000 this may indicate a reason for failure, or at least high load cycle wear. There is a load cycle for every minute of power up time. After you replace the drive make sure that the new drive isn't doing this as well.


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I would personally replace the drive. If you, for some reason do not want do to do that yet, but linger on with the drive a while yet, you need some way to ensure that you do not accidentially use the bad areas for new files. I had such a drive on an old Mac just recording video, and decided that I did not want to change it yet, as the videos were just ...


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Your drive is very happy to do a self-test; from the summary, it has done more than five of them in the past hour. And all of them have failed, early on in the test, with read errors. Yes, this hard drive is failing. As the famous Google Labs report said (though I can't put my hand on a link to it at the moment), if smartctl says your drive is failing, it ...



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