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16

I think you're having a misunderstanding of the rsync algorithm and how the tool should be applied. Rsync's performance advantage comes from doing delta transfers-- that is, moving only the changed bits in a file. In order to determine the changed bits, the file has to be read by the source and destination hosts and block checksums compared to determine ...


14

Well, we finally appear to have resolved this issue in our environment. For the benefits of others, here's what we discovered and how we fixed the problem: To try and gain further insight into what was occurring before/during/after the delays we used Wireshark on a client machine to capture/analyse network traffic whilst that client attempted to access a ...


13

This Apple support article explains how to do this: Mac OS X 10.4: How to prevent .DS_Store file creation over network connections Open the Terminal. Type: defaults write com.apple.desktopservices DSDontWriteNetworkStores true Press Return. Restart the computer


13

SMB might well be slower than some other file sharing protocols, and it might well be faster than some others. But that's not the important part. Instead of making that the question/argument, can you find a way to move on from that and ask whether SMB is as fast (or as slow!) as it is supposed to be. For example, can you transfer a file using FTP between ...


13

Commenting out the printers section actually does nothing, add this to your smb.conf: load printers = no printing = bsd printcap name = /dev/null disable spoolss = yes (spoolss is not a typo)


13

if you type the command net use \\SERVERNAME /u:DOMAIN\USER you will be prompted for the password of that user to be used when accessing that server


10

Whilst there are faster protocols than SMB it's not by any means inherently slow. It is however perhaps a little more susceptible to outside influences than other protocols, these being saturated servers, saturated segments etc. If I were a gambling man I'd suspect that your network could do with either a redesign or some investment as many company's ...


10

This really piqued my interest. I was able to replicate your findings in my lab with the same pattern of results that you describe. I used Procmon to to try to see what changes are made and almost gave up until I saw the following: That shows lsass.exe (Local Security Authority) writing to the local SAM and making a change(s) to the built-in Guest account ...


9

I believe that doing this will allow users to delete files from their desktop/documents folder etc, and still provide a way to restore from the recycle bin. I can confirm that with Folder Redirection, Recycle Bin still works on Windows 2008R2. Probably works on 2012 as well. But Folder Redirection and WinXP clients for example, Recycle Bin does not ...


8

Please identify which OSes you're using for both server and clients. In client OSes above 98/NT "Network Neighbourhood" has been superseded by "My Network Places". The location of this resource is defined by two registry entries: HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Shell Folders\NetHood ...


7

They're OS X Finder metadata. You can disable them in 10.4 for remote filesystems, but 10.5 sets them to hidden on Windows. Regardless, you can disable them as well - but you have to do it for each user (or copy the preferences file).


7

It should be fine. Windows Explorer does a fine job of displaying filename case correctly. I use this in my smb.conf to make sure what I type in Explorer is what Samba uses (I set all of these per-share): case sensitive = True default case = lower preserve case = yes short preserve case = yes I ran through a quick test (Samba 3.0.24 on the backend, ...


7

In my experience the kernel mode server out performed samba with my clients. If performance is your number one concern, skip samba. That said, there are a number of limitations to the Solaris kernel-mode SMB/CIFS server, most notably: Only runs in the global zone. Samba can run in multiple isolated zones and/or the global zone simultaneously. Sharing ...


7

Ports 137-139 are for NetBios/Name resolution. Without it you will have to access machines by IP address opposed to NetBIOS name. Example \\192.168.1.100\share_name opposed to \\my_file_server\share_name So port 445 is sufficient if you can work with IP addresses only.


6

Yes. As far as I know, WebDAV is designed to work like a filesystem, over HTTP. For Apache there is mod_dav, and from a quick check on the Interwebs, IIS has it built-in, somehow. Maybe WebDAV is something that could help you. -Chris


6

The short answer is: Meh. On a file "Move" (AKA Cut and Paste) between the same share it will simply change the index on the file server (pretty much instant). Unfortunately when you try to move between two different shares (Even on the same file server) or do a "copy" operation it does pull the data through the client PC (slow). On any "move" operation ...


5

you definitively do not want to do it... at least not to windows. ports to forward [both samba and windows]: tcp 135, 139, 445. possibly - but not necesarly 135-139 udp. part for accessing windows workstation 135, 445 tcp are multiplexed for plenty of purposes - including remote registry access, remote management, communication with domain controllers. ...


5

What is the OS of your client and server? One thing that can make a difference is to update your servers to windows 2008 and your clients to Vista. When you do this you get to take advantage of SMB2 which is less chatty, has larger buffers, and can do multiple things in a single request making it less sensitive to latency.


5

Check na_options. http://filer/na_admin/man/man1/na_options.1.html cifs.smb2.enable This option enables SMB 2.0 support on the Filer. When this option is enabled, the Filer uses SMB 2.0 with a Windows client, if the client supports SMB 2.0. When this option is disabled, the Filer will not accept any new SMB 2.0 sessions; existing sessions ...


5

Personally for a low number of Linux servers I wouldn't join them to the domain. If you and a couple of admins are going to be the only ones logging into the server itself, creating accounts on the couple of servers won't take long. The for the applications that run on the server, try to pick ones with ldap support if you want people to log into the ...


5

This command is a very little known secret of Samba. It returns IP adresses of all Samba servers in one's own broadcast domain: nmblookup __SAMBA__ This one returns a list of all NetBIOS names and their aliases of all Samba servers in the neighbourhood (it does a 'node status query'): nmblookup -S __SAMBA__ This one returns a list of all IP adresses of ...


5

What you've described would certainly give me cause for concern for a couple of reasons: The fact that the rep was insistent on Gigabit networking for such a small app. It may turn out to have no practical impact on your network, but it would make me seriously concerned about the application's design. A 50-user ERP system shouldn't trouble a 10Mbit line, ...


5

The short answer is to simply give up on using SMB over a high-latency link. The protocol preforms badly over high-latency links because it has many operations that require many round trips for acknowledgement. Tunning TCP over TCP also results in issues will work for both the SSH and the encapsulated protocol. If you can get the client and server to ...


5

CIFS is an implementation of SMB. For all intents and purposes they are the same thing.


5

A more secure solution than that proposed by SvenW, and one that is more in keeping with the Apple way of doing things, is to add the password to the keychain. Here's how you would do it for an AFP share (I assume all you'd need to do is change the protocol specified by the -r option but I don't have the possibility of testing this with SMB right now; note ...


5

Welcome to the wonderful world of SMB over any connection with higher than LAN latency. Everything you describe is perfectly normal for such scenarios, once you're over 20 ms things get significantly slower, in excess of 50 ms and it's painfully so. The protocol is very poorly designed for connections with higher than LAN latencies. Especially when working ...


5

Liberally stolen from http://superuser.com/questions/187650/enable-file-sharing-only-when-on-home-wi-fi-network-in-mac-os-x : Even if slightly expensive, you can use NetworkLocation to autodetect your location, and after configuring it for your home network, add Application > Open an Application / Run Script and configure it so that it runs this ...


5

You can usually get a pretty good idea of this just by opening "Share and Storage Management" on your 2008R2 server, and over in the right pane you'll see "Manage Sessions" and "Manage Open Files". You might try that first. If that fails, you might try Process Explorer from Sysinternals. Do a handle search for the file name. The process that has an open ...


5

If a user has rights to a sub-directory on a share, I believe it is possible to directly map to it. net use m: \\server\public\jprof\cs101\files You can't map M: (for example) directly to the share and navigate down, that's what messes some people up. To do that you'll have to get funky with permissions, and that's a lot of work.



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