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29

TLS just enables encryption on the smtp session and doesn't directly affect whether or not Postfix will be allowed to relay a message. The relaying denied message occurs because the smtpd_recipient_restrictions rules was not matched. One of those conditions must be fulfilled to allow the message to go through: smtpd_recipient_restrictions = ...


10

Every recent mail server is capable of doing the job with that minimal requirements you provide. You are sending only 800 mails per hour. This can be done in 5 minutes without pain. So check the server that fits your requirements. Any of Sendmail, Courier, Qmail, Exim or (my favorite) Postfix can do what you want. Without any problem. Edit: But I would ...


9

main.cf #relayhost = [smtp.domain.net]:587 transport_maps = hash:/etc/postfix/transport /etc/postfix/transport domaintodeliverdirectyto : * smtp:[smtp.domain.net]:587 Don't forget to postmap /etc/postfix/transport May want to use relay instead of smtp as the transport mechanisim. For reference http://www.postfix.org/transport.5.html


8

It's not an open relay if you are merely accepting any mail from a single IP address. (Open relays accept any mail from anywhere.) In this case, simply add the IP address to mynetworks in your Postfix main.cf. Oh, and don't send spam.


7

I'd imagine the MTA will split up a message for different MXes when it has to. From my experience with Sendmail behavior, this will be when it encounters different next MTAs in the recipient list of a given message. If there's just one next MTA it talks to for a given message, there will be just one transaction. With a smarthost configuration, the next ...


5

I fought with this for a few weeks. Here are the settings that I'm using on 3 ASP.NET websites that use SMTP gateway to send their emails: Address: smtp.gmail.com Port: 587 1) The port is very important. You may have to enter it like smtp.gmail.com:587 in your SMTP server. I haven't touched Microsoft SMTP in years, so I can't remember what the setup screen ...


5

If your software follows the RFCs no delay is required. You should be able to send multiple emails in the same connection without delays. If your software just sends messages and relies on delays rather than following the RFCs, there is no correct answer. EDIT: If you read the RFCs you will see mail is sent using a conversational protocol. If your ...


5

By "accessing my mail via my iPhone" do you mean receiving mail on a client? This usually uses either POP3 or IMAP, not SMTP, and Postfix is not a POP3 or IMAP server. You'd need something like Dovecot to provide POP3 or IMAP access for clients.


5

It's probably running postfix, not sendmail. The sendmail command is provided mainly for cross-compatibility. You'll find the configuration files for postfix in /etc/postfix and documentation at the Postfix homepage.


4

2 Questions here.. Is is it possible, yes in a backup MX kind of way. I use Postfix as the backup MX SMTP server, so when the main SMTP point is down on the exchange server (due to reboot, patching or whatever) the linux box will store any overflow mail that the exchange server couldn't cope with. How I do it is with MX records in the domain files, ...


4

Add the following to your sendmail.mc: define(`RELAY_MAILER_ARGS', `TCP $h 587') define(`ESMTP_MAILER_ARGS’, `TCP $h 587′) That should get your outbound mail being sent by Sendmail on port 587. You'll also need to have sendmail configured to do TLS. It's a bit beyond the scope of your question, but you can find a lot of decent guides about how to do it ...


4

My answer is similar to that of splattne but I have a different interpretation of the Recieved header Received: from 1.1.1.1 [2.2.2.2] by mail.mypersonaldomain.com with SMTP; (date and time) The exact format of Recieved lines varies with different servers, but generally the from part consists of the name given in the HELO/EHLO SMTP command with the IP ...


4

smtpd_use_tls = no You've disabled TLS, so you now need to authorise your local network by adding it to mynetworks. For example, mynetworks = 192.168.1.0/24 127.0.0.0/8 This will fix sending from your local network only. For sending email from outside your local network, you'll need to get TLS authentication working.


4

The queue viewer will tell you why Exchange feels like it's unable to deliver. Running a sniffer and watching the traffic generated after forcing a queue to retry might give you some insight, too. Failing that you can crank up diagnostc logging, too. See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/823489 for details about the queue viewer and diagnostic logging.


4

I think they've always done this, even when you've configured your gmail to send from other domains. As far as I know, the only way around this is to switch to using Google Apps, which is free if you just use the standard edition. The problem with this is that it means you have to change your MX records so that google handles all of your incoming mail, and ...


4

Here's an article related to setting this up in Exchange Server 2007. http://msexchangeteam.com/archive/2006/12/28/432013.aspx


4

The logging that you posted is just showing the attempted establishment of TLS over SMTP between your Sendmail and Google's server and nothing more. If your Sendmail is able to send to other addresses fine, then it is probably functioning. You might send something to a non-Google address to examine its header. That will provide some quick answers to how ...


4

This, tcp 0 0 78.153.208.195:imap 86-40-60-183-dynamic.:10029 is an external connection using IMAP to read mail from a mailbox on your server. This, tcp 0 1 78.153.208.195:35563 news.avanport.pt:smtp SYN_SENT is your server sending outbound SMTP mail to news.avanport.pt Without knowing more about what it ...


4

According to Micrsoft support: To replay the messages that are located in the Badmail folder, follow these steps: Stop the SMTP service. a. Open IIS Manager. b. Right-click Default SMTP Virtual Server, and then click Stop. Copy all the files that are located in the Badmail folder and that have the .bad file name extension. Then, paste these files to the ...


4

Well, the log says it: Nov 4 20:38:34 2-5-8 postfix/local[990]: 1492A3E0C6C: to=<info@bhcom.info>, relay=local, delay=0.12, delays=0.08/0.01/0/0.04, dsn=5.1.1, status=bounced (unknown user: "info") Nov 4 20:38:34 2-5-8 postfix/local[990]: 28ED53E0C6D: to=<razvoj@bhcom.info>, relay=local, delay=0.06, delays=0.03/0/0/0.02, dsn=5.1.1, ...


4

Almost certainly to do with SELinux. I bet you moved your main.cf into that location. Try running restorecon -v /etc/postfix/main.cf to fix the labelling.


4

Any decent internet provider will remove that block on a business account. Especially if you are paying for a static IP address, which would be best for running a mail server. Most probably will not remove it on residential accounts. The blocks are to prevent spam and email viruses spreading. Since the vast majority wont be running their own mail server ...


4

Unless I misunderstand your design, your relay server will be the one making a direct connection to remote mail servers. Therefore whichever public ip your relay uses should be the one seen (and checked and possibly reported) by the remote server(s).


4

You should be configuring phpmailer to connect to localhost, not to the hostname of the machine (which will then use its external IP address to connect). Localhost is allowed to relay mail through postfix by mynetworks, but when you connect with the hostname it's via the public IP address, which is not allowed to relay.


3

You can setup your own SMTP server to send email messages from, while using Google Apps in parallel. However, these messages will not be in your "Sent Mail" mail unless you moved using IMAP and replies to these messages will go to the mail servers in your MX records (Google by default). You can set it up to send using a different sub domain, but that is not ...


3

Found this explanation here of exactly what I needed (when using IIS) : http://fmuntean.wordpress.com/2008/10/26/how-to-configure-iis-smtp-server-to-forward-emails-using-a-gmail-account/ I am sending mail using this C# code var client = new SmtpClient("127.0.0.1", 587); client.EnableSsl = false; Note: the communication between my C# app and my local ...


3

No, not if the domain holder follows good security rules. Problem: Well maintained Domains have an SPF record stating exactly which servers are allowed to send email on behalf of the domain. Any other server (like yours) sending the email is automatically getting the email marked as spam. Some idiot broker tried that with their contact form for me - lost ...


3

Yes, doable. But you will have to upgrade to Exchange 2010 - seriously. 2007 / 2010 are all about distributed storage architectures, having a mail procesing backbone, distributed storage etc.


3

Sendmail is able to do this with the LDAP Routing feature.



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