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4

Unless I misunderstand your design, your relay server will be the one making a direct connection to remote mail servers. Therefore whichever public ip your relay uses should be the one seen (and checked and possibly reported) by the remote server(s).


3

Your SMTP service seems to be working fine. Your problem is that you're trying to send email from your MUA on port 25, which is a bad idea even if you could make it work somehow. You need to enable the submission section in your postfix master.cf and then configure your email client to send on port 587 instead of 25.


3

Any decent internet provider will remove that block on a business account. Especially if you are paying for a static IP address, which would be best for running a mail server. Most probably will not remove it on residential accounts. The blocks are to prevent spam and email viruses spreading. Since the vast majority wont be running their own mail server ...


3

RFC 1860 Section 6.1(2) states that upon reciept of a mail message that is larger than the maximum size limit, the receiving server may respond to the sending server with an SMTP status of "552 message size exceeds fixed maximium message size" The MTA isn't required to respond to the rejection with a 522, but that is the preferred method (and expected by ...


2

lists/config/config.php does not always contain all fine-tune settings. See config/config_extended.php # in the above you can specify multiple SMTP servers like this: # 'server1:port1;server2:port2;server3:port3' eg #define('PHPMAILERHOST','smtp1.mydomain.com:25;smtp2.mydomain.com:2500;smtp3.phplist.com:5123'); # if you want to use smtp authentication when ...


2

SMTP provides no guarantee of delivery and no guarantee of timely delivery. the only thing you can do is rule out your systems as the cause of the delay. Here's what I would suggest: Find a sample email sent from your client and compare the time it got to your firewall against the time it got to your proxy and then against the time it got to your Exchange ...


2

Honestly, the right thing to do is to pick the ISP where you put your main mail server a little more carefully. But assuming that's out of the question, I wouldn't do this at layer 3 (iptables), I'd do it at layer 4 (application, being SMTP), taking advantage of SMTP's inherent store-and-forward nature. The procedure looks somewhat like this: Set up a ...


2

Use transport_maps and relayhost feature from postfix. Edit main.cf, and add this two lines relayhost = smtp.b.example.com transport_maps = hash:/etc/postfix/transportmaps The above file (/etc/postfix/transportmaps) should contain something like: a@example.com smtp.a.example.com b@example.com smtp.a.example.com Don't forget to postmap that file.


2

What kind of error do you get? Relay not allowed? Generally, as far as I know, Exchange 2010 doesn't allow relaying mails (i.e. accept recipients that the server is not authoritative for). That's probably, why you can send mails to internal recipients. In fact, you should be careful not to block legitimate mail from outside your organization to enter the ...


2

Question What Linux tool can immediately (without queueing) relay e-mails to recipient SMTP server and provide valid bounce messages? Or, if there is better solution of this problem, what tools should I look at? The postfix itself has MULTIPLE INSTANCE feature. It will lets you define separate instance of postfix that have its own queue and ...


2

You should monitor the relay's IP - if this is the MTA doing the actual delivery, then delivery will fail if it gets into RBL/PBL


1

This problem was bugging me for a while. I was trying to connect from server1.domain.com to server2.domain.com. Here's how I fixed this - #/etc/postfix/main.cf mydomain = server1.domain.com myhostname = $mydomain virtual_alias_maps = hash:/etc/postfix/virtual alias_database = hash:/etc/postfix/virtual myorigin = /etc/mailname mydestination = ...


1

I have a similar set up relaying via mailgun. Firstly, you can get the public IP of an instance using: http://169.254.169.254/latest/meta-data/public-ipv4 From within the instance, in my case I use orchestration (ie. Chef + OpsWorks) to automatically create a DNS record in Route53 for the instance on boot. You could probably also use: ...


1

First, most third party SMTP gateway providers support using their service as a authenticated, encrypted relay host: sendgrid documentation Dyn documentation AWS SES documentation mailjet documentation mailgun documentation etc. etc. etc. The key is, you shouldn't have to do access control using IP addresses or hostname. You use encryption (TLS) and ...


1

sendgrid uses password based authentication (config details for that below). It won't care about your IP, or the hostnames you use (myhostname, myorigin, etc). The hostname your server presents to sendgrid in the HELO (or EHLO) greeting is likely to appear in mail headers. Some recipients' spam software may check it, so use something that does exist in ...


1

Yes, that's what the transport table is for, depending on what you use (SQL, dbm, flat text files, etc) the setup is fairly simple. On the slave you'd create an entry like this client.domain smtp:[ip.of.the.master] That will mean that when the slave server receives mail for that domain, it will use smtp to relay it to your master server, who will then ...


1

If you're using a relayserver, i guess you use the smarthost configuration of exim. If so, then you just need to identify the routeur that takes care of routing mail to smarthost, and define a transport for this router that uses the smtp driver but on port 587: remote_submission: driver =smtp protocol = smtp port = 587 You can also edit the default ...


1

You'll need to go into Exchange System Manager and setup your relay that way. After you're in ESM expand the organization, then the servers, then expand the server name, and finally expand Protocols. Select Relay. The rest is basically making sure that only the IP of the server/program your company uses is allowed to relay is set right; meaning only allow ...


1

I had this too. Took me a while to figure, however the solution I found was simple. You have a smarthost which you want to use to send emails from your local host, which also runs Exim4. For that reason you seem to have selected the right dpkg-configure exim4-reconfigure options. As your exim4.conf.conf shows an entry under dc_relay_domains. So far, so ...


1

https://support.google.com/a/answer/2956491?hl=en&ref_topic=2921034 they do provide what you want if you look


1

Solution: We changed our outgoing SMTP from the 3rd party to our ISP's server. Have not had any more black listing issues since. I'm assuming going through the 3rd party as well as a host of other people probably got the 3rd party's IP address blacklisted, and had nothing to do with us particularly. Since the 3rd party hosting has multiple accounts and ...


1

According to the this MS Knowledge base article You need a postfix 2.9 or later for relaying to work. I ended up installing postfix-2.10.1 from source along with cyrus-sasl-2.1.25 (not dovecoat like you seem to be using in your setup) Since my distribution of choice has a to old postfix version in its repositories. Using the following make flags taken from ...


1

Note that I suspect #3 is happening because the mailbox is full, but the receiving system believes it may eventually be empty enough to receive the mail. It probably sends back a 4xx error (temporary failure) and the sending system keeps trying for 5 days, and then sends a bounce to the user. Also as a further comment to Ruscal's excellent summary above, ...


1

In case you're a Windows guy, the IIS virtual SMTP service can be installed on most versions of Windows Server, which can be configured to accept anonymous inbound connections and forward to an authenticated smarthost, in much the same way as Matt's Heraka option: In the vSMTP service's properties, within IIS Manager: The Access tab has an Authenticaton ...


1

Assuming the SMTP server you are testing is the one setup to handle myserver.com, it's completely normal. Mail is transferred from server to server unauthenticated. That's just how SMTP works. It's only when you expect the server to forward the mail elsewhere for you that you should need to authenticate. Anyone can connect to the mail server that handles ...


1

You obviously don't know how SMTP works. Sending email TO your server for YOUR domain doesn't require authentication. Sending email THROUGH your server for ANOTHER domain does require (or should require) authentication.


1

Bounce messages intentionally do not have a sender address. This is to prevent email loops. Sending email without an address has been used to send spam, intentionally or not. If your relay requires you to provide credentials before sending to verify the sender, it will not be able to verify the sender for bounce messages. You can avoid the issue of not ...


1

Without knowing which mail server you're running it's hard to be specific, but many people lock down their mail servers to only allow you to send mail from approved IP addresses. This appears to be the case here. You'll need to talk to the person who manages your mail server and get them to allow the web server to send mail.


1

Try find if You are not in black list: http://www.spamhaus.org/query/ip/10.0.0.10


1

If your desktop client is on a home network, there's an excellent chance that your ISP prohibits outbound connections on port 25. If your connection attempts are being blocked by your ISP that would explain why you see no evidence of them on your server. As Michael Hampton says, you can enable the submission service on port 587. I would also recommend ...



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