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5

As shown in your graphic, no protocol that exists "between" SMTP and POP3. SMTP is responsible for moving the message from the sending computer to the recipient's mail server. If there are multiple servers involved in moving the message from the sender's server to the recipient's server, each one moves the message via the SMTP protocol. These in-between ...


3

Don't open postfix for everyone. You can allow relay access to one address (or network) with the following line in your main.cf mynetworks = 127.0.0.0/8, xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/yy xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx => the address you want to permit yy => the netmask of your host (or network)


2

You can configure specific ip-adresses to use your postfix or sendmail installation as an outgoing SMTP server or relay host without SMTP authentication, which is much better idea. In sendmail that is configured with the access map, typically /etc/mail/access: Connect:127.0.0.1 RELAY Connect:10.9.8.7 RELAY Connect:192.168.1 RELAY ...


2

DNS settings: set up so-called reverse record that bind your IP-address with some domain, f.e. thedilldesign.com. Usually you can do it via VPS management panel set MX records for all your domains to the same value - thedilldesign.com set SPF records for all your domains to confirm that thedilldesign.com is legal submitter for that domains EXIM settings ...


2

That's means that postfix have try to deliver four messages to the user's mailbox at the same time. As far as you have used mbox as mailbox format, each delivery should be performed as sequence of operations. Message should be stored, indices should be updated and so on. To prevent simultaneous deliveries that can broke mbox structures, each delivery first ...


1

It seems that you've figured this out already, but the way to do that is through firewall rules with a specific gateway chosen. In pfSense and in general, this is called Policy Based Routing or Policy Routing, so try searching for those terms if you have specific issues.


1

Are you using traditional the mbox format? You should consider converting all mailboxes to Maildir format to avoid such locking errors (and much better performance). The logs for Dovecot don't seem particularly troublesome, they just indicate an user was disconnected due to inactivity, which is OK.


1

Both. You will have them for mysmtp.com and they will have them for their own domains. People who look at the headers will see your mail server, and possible email you if the client's postmaster@ address doesn't lead to satisfaction.


1

You should migrate sendmail's "direct delivery for other host in the same domain" hack to postfix. [You reported use of smart host in both configurations] sendmail sendmail.mc LOCAL_NET_CONFIG R$* < @ $* .$m. > $* $#smtp $@ $2.$m. $: $1 < @ $2.$m. > $3 postfix master.cf transport_maps = hash:/etc/postfix/transport ...


1

Yes. Yes you can - or at least someone can. With the lack of detailed information about your existing setup, that's the most detailed answer I can give you. /Edit : The only thing you set in the local email client is which SMTP server to send mail through. Create your hypothetical new server and configure your clients to use it. Safelist/blocklist is all ...


1

Unless you have a high volume of email you shouldn't need a dedicated email server. It is common to dedicate a domain name like smtp.example.com or mail.example.com to email. This can co-exist on the same server as the web service using the www.example.com domain. Use of dedicated domains in this manner is a sign of professionalism. A few things you ...


1

If you want to test if gmail smtp port 465 is reachable from your network, just type in a telnet alt1.gmail-smtp-in.l.google.com 465 command. If you don't get an error message back, it is reachable. There is a possible solution, that you could set up an outgoing mail proxy on another port (f.e. port 24) on some of your servers, if you have, although I don't ...


1

You forget to mention what SMTP server you are using. If using Postfix you'll have some build-in features like http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#smtpd_client_message_rate_limit to reduce the number of messages a client can send along with http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#anvil_rate_time_unit to specify a period of time to monitor. As far as i ...


1

smtp has a LONG history of security failures (sendmail, emacs, et al.). So does MS. Frankly, the LAST thing I would ever do is expect an MS machine to keep incoming smtp secure. We usually put an smtp proxy between any Windows machine providing mail and the Internet (e.g. FreeBSD with postfix configured with anti-spam AV and simple forwarding). That being ...



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