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2

The simplest solution is to run two mail servers on premise. One handles only incoming mail, while the other handles only outgoing mail and knows nothing of the first server.


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You cannot really install Exchange 2010 and then not have it used, as Exchange doesn't work like that. Therefore I would check the Exchange 2010 server is configured correctly. Enable anonymous authentication on the Default Receive Connector and restart the MS Exchange Transport service. It isn't clear from your error whether Exchange directly answers the ...


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After more research, it seems like the way to do what I want is to use regexp in the the sender_canonical file. I tried to write the following expression, but it seems there is something wrong. /^((?!@domain1.tld)(?!@domain2.tld)(?!@domain3.tld)(?!@domain4.tld)(?!@domain5.tld).)*$/gm no-reply@domain1.tld EDIT : I finally found the correct way to write ...


1

At a guess -- you've configured your SMTP client to require secure connections (hence the STARTTLS request to the server) but the SMTP Server doesn't understand it, so the Client decides it can't connect? (It's also possible that you're trying to connect to port 25 rather than port 587 which is more often used for TLS SMTP. If you connect to port 25, you ...


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Use Microsoft Robocopy to mirror the folders and files to the new drive. Be sure to include the NTFS permissions too. For example, if D:\Inetpub\ doesn't already exist, the following command should work. robocopy C:\Inetpub\ D:\Inetpub\ /MIR /SEC Now that the content has been duplicated, change the paths from within the application. You shouldn't have ...


4

Official documentation from Microsoft on this is hard to find. Bottom line: Although not currently supported in Exchange, it appears Microsoft is beginning to support EAI in Office which means they may be planning to support EAI in the future for other products. This is based on the following paragraph from a Microsoft article about new features in Outlook ...


2

A common use case is if the target destination is temporarily offline, the sender may attempt to deliver to an intermediate host (typically the service provider of the target destination) with a higher MX record number. The intermediate host would periodically attempt delivery, and when the target destination host comes back online, the messages are ...


2

Think of SPF and DKIM as ways to validate the mail path, and think of DMARC as an extension that also validates the message sender. Think of this as delivering a FedEx letter. It's easy to validate where the envelope was shipped from, and that the courier was legitimate, but it doesn't provide a way to prove that the letter inside the envelope is really ...


2

1) yes, likely the dmarc failure will cause gmail to junk your mails 2) also would be interested in an answer for this 3) I would (and we do) use the reply-to field for the customer address, our mails look like this: from: website@mydomain.com to: user@mydomain.com subject: contact form reply to: customer-addy@somewhere.com Hope this helps


1

Mail shouldn't be delivered to the second server if you have AD sites and services configured correctly. My instinct is that you don't. As Exchange is AD site aware, it is important that you have the subnets applied to the correct site, so that Exchange and the domain controllers can see the correct site that they are located in. Although personally I ...


1

Make sendmail.cf store ${cn_subject} with host part stripped in ${cn1_subject}. It makes finishing the implementation almost trivial. WARNING: Ask for opinions at news:comp.mail.sendmail before deploying it in not test environment. It MAY work but sendmail makes avoiding "unexpected side effects" MUCH MORE painstaking than I am ready to "invest". I ...


1

I think your title is incorrect. Should it be "How do I send eMail from another Domain?" or something like that. There are any number of reasons you get classified as spam: rDNS validation doesn't work for IP address (PTR -> A -> PTR). rDNS validation doesn't work for the name you use in the HELO or EHLO command. Nothing is answering on port 25 on ...


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It makes me feel dirty to say this, but why not keep the EX2010 box and make it a hybrid deployment? You could continue to relay messages from your CDO libraries to SMTP receive on EX2010, then they would go across to O365 via the "on-premises to cloud" connector. Then you can explain to the business that their old LOB application is causing increased ...


0

You can set up SSMTP, a lightweight program that replaces postfix and is good for just sending email out - but it doesn't receive email. You can set the from address. It works well for me. Setup is slightly fiddly so you'll need to find a guide or tutorial - mine won't be out for a week or so.


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To be sure we're clear, src 0.0.0.0/0 port 465 refers to source IP but destination port. The source of the traffic (CIDR range) and the destination (listening) port or port range. http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonVPC/latest/UserGuide/VPC_ACLs.html What's interesting about the question is that what's "wrong" (that is, the source of the confusion) ...


3

No, there is not. DNS wise. Normal approach is one server forwards specific accounts to another server. Via settings on the one authoritative server that gets all emails.


1

You can't login using an alias, because it's not an email account, just a pointer to a real account. If you want to login using it, you need to create an account with the same name (and had to delete the alias first). But all if you need is to send an email with that address as from address, you may setup the email client software accordingly. It is ...


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You have two options, depending on your postfix restrictions and the type of application/client you are using to send the email. You can rename your account as your alias name, and use the alias' email address. Use your the alias address directly within the MAIL FROM request.


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I still received errors. postfix/trivial-rewrite[4745]: warning: hash:/etc/postfix/transport lookup error for "*" They got fixed after running: postmap /etc/postfix/transport


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From what I have seen Outlook is likely defaulting to attempt authentication. This will cause issues if you haven't set up an authentication mechanism. The other clients likely detected that you don't offer or require authentication. Outlook does offer an option to turn off authentication in its server configuration tabs. It may be difficult to change. ...


2

Your server is not listening on port 587. I accept that you think you've been able to connect to it from some other machines, but I can only surmise that they've been going through some kind of transparent proxy which has hijacked connections to mail-server-type services, and whisked you off to some local mail server. In other words, the machine that can't ...


1

There is no need to put nginx or any other form of load balancer in front of your border SMTP servers. If you don't get the configuration right, it is likely to hurt your ability to successfully deliver mail. Just put your servers in your DMZ. Incoming traffic will be part way through a conversation before you can route it appropriately. IMAP users will ...


1

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but AFAIK, sendmail does not offer that level of granularity. For outbound mail, that means a simple three-step opportunistic format by default: Check to see if remote downstream MTA advertises support STARTTLS. If the remote side DOES advertise support, proceed to negotiate a STARTTLS connection. If the remote side ...


1

This isn't exactly an answer to the question as posed, but it looks to me like you are doing things the hard way. The Sendmail configuration was written in a way that prioritises ease and efficiency for the software parsing that configuration, not for easy configuration and maintenance by humans. There's simply been no good reason to do that in recent ...


0

I solved my issue by using a free SMTP redirect tool. (I guess I was asking the wrong question.) I signed up at http://ghettosmtp.com and pointed my MX records to them. They in turn forward my incoming messages to a port of my choosing on my server. I setup my /etc/postfix/master.cf to listen on said port, and now I can receive email too.


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GeoIP filtering with xtables-addons can cut up to 95% spam by restricting access to your SMTP from those countries, that your company won't ever get mail from. Please follow xtables-addons installation guide for your OS (here is one for CentOS), then simply add something like: iptables -A INPUT -m geoip -p tcp --dport 25 --src-cc ...


0

If you want to reject packet before it reaches smtp, you need to do this based on IP address. This means there is always risk to block legitimate emails. If you accept the risk you can use whois service and block all subnets assigned to HINET-NET (there are a lot btw) link to whois



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