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Yes, you can. To summrize the steps, you need to: Create a contact inside Exchange. Mail-Enable the contact you just created. Enable mail forward from the users to the newly created contact. The steps are well documented in this Microsoft Knowledge Base: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/281926 Note that there might be some step variations, but the idea ...


-1

If I'm understanding your question, I think your answer lies here: rewrite-recipient-of-all-except-one-recipient-outgoing-e-mail. It shows how to route based on recipient and has many references for postfix maps. This question asked of routing based on IP. The responder tells it's not possible. The first is the most likely solution to the problem, I think. ...


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We have two facts here You are connect to bluehost via port 465 Postfix reported an error message: lost connection with boxNNN.bluehost.com[a.b.c.d] while receiving the initial server greeting One possible explanation is SMTP client in Postfix 2.11 or older doesn't support SSL. Explanation In SMTP, there are two encryptions scheme: STARTTLS and SMTPS. ...


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You must include the signing table via: refile:/etc/opendkim/SigningTable Refile means that regular expressions get evaluated. When it is included via file:/... regular expressions are not evaluated.


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You must not authenticate for each email you should send. At the beginning of the process: Session session = loadSession(); Transport transport = session.getTransport("smtp"); transport.connect("example@gmail.com", "password"); After, use the transport object for send each mail without start session: transport.sendMessage(message, ...


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I contacted my hosting provider to help me resolve the issue. For those who are seeking answer for similar issue, I suggest to contact their hosting provider. In my case, this was the reply from hostgator (my hosting provider). "The mails were being blocked due to Commtouch blacklisting as the mail patterns were considered suspcious by Commtouch. We ...


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I believe your issue here is SPF. You need to designate your hosting IP as a permitted sender of email for your domain when you have SPF on. You would do this from your domain registrar. Create a new TXT record to add your IP as a permitted sender. TXT mydomain.com "v=spf1 ip4:192.168.0.x mx -all" Where the 192.168.0.x is replaced with your hosting IP. ...


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Your Outlook mail client, as shown in your image: is not set to use SASL authentication. Outlook's "Outgoing Server" dialogue may not be self-explanatory: "Log on to incoming mail server before sending mail" means do not SASL authenticate, but POP first. However, your Postfix settings require SASL: smtpd_client_restrictions = permit_sasl_authenticated ...


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What you need to do is first setup aliasing that address. You can do this with the aliases plugin (or the plugin you listed in your question). See the documentation here: http://haraka.github.io/manual/plugins/aliases.html (and add the plugin to config/plugins). Secondly you need to set things up to relay everything outbound, since you want everything to go ...


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Follow the steps here to make it work. Setup a SPF record Setup DKIM Setup a DMARC record Setup a reverse DNS record HELO must be a host name not an IP Make sure that your IP is not on a blacklist Use a static IP address for your server Sign up for JMRP and SNDS


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The first thing I would do before proceeding further would be to test port 25 end to end with a tool like netcat. The tool comes standard with most linux distros. For example on CentOS I would stop postfix to release port 25. Then I would start netcat like this: # nc -l 25 Then on the remote client I would start it like this: # nc {ip of remote ...


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According to the nmap docs: filtered Nmap cannot determine whether the port is open because packet filtering prevents its probes from reaching the port. The filtering could be from a dedicated firewall device, router rules, or host-based firewall software. These ports frustrate attackers because they provide so little information. Sometimes they respond ...


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Use spamhole: https://sourceforge.net/projects/spamhole/ From the website: spamhole is a fake sopen SMTP relay, intended to stop (some) spam by convincing spammers that it is delivering spam messages for them, when in fact it is not.


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[...] we import that mail in Gmail like any other emails from our boxes [...] That's wrong, as the mail headers tell as something different: Received: from server.webvizarts.com (server.webvizarts.com . [188.40.153.39]) by mx.google.com with ESMTPS id ge6si41332059wjd.24.2015.02.19.06.26.03 for <example@gmail.com> ...


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Try changing the rate / time to 500 / 30s, or 50 / 3s to see if lowering the interval makes exim be more reactive to bursts, and thus better enforcing. You might also try specifying what to apply this ratelimit to: # System-wide rate limit defer message = Sorry, too busy. Try again later. ratelimit = 10 / 1s / $primary_hostname


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Let's split it per statement Servers that reject all bounce mails (contrary to the RFCs). Yes, this misconfigured server rejects all email with sender <>. To work around this problem, postfix, for example, uses either the local postmaster address or an address of "double-bounce" in the MAIL FROM part of the callout. Yes, this workaround ...


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There is no connection between them, as SPF records are set per domain, not per sending host. If several different domains each send email coming only from one host, say mail.example.com, then each should have an SPF record like a:mail.example.com -all. Note that each makes no reference to the other domains sending from mail.example.com. It is only ...


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You are using a Debian exim4 split config (you're likely using a Debian or Ubuntu based distro). When referring to Debian based systems, we always specifically say exim4 to indicate that it's a non-default exim configuration. The file you are editing is a template configuration file, not the actual file that Debian's exim4 reads. The Debian init scripts ...


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RFC 3848 transmission types included commands such as EHLO and a few others that you might see today. ESMTPA introduced EHLO as a command that it was an SMTP server that could handle additional commands compared to standard SMTP, this command is now required per RFC 5321. The ESMTP format was restated in RFC 2821 (superseding RFC 821) and updated to the ...


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Does anyone here have any experience with the above and how quick and easy are either to implement, maintain and extend? I have some experience with Sendmail (dozens of servers, 0 current), Qmail (thousands of servers, 3 current), Postfix (hundreds of servers, 25 current), Qpsmtpd (tens of servers, 1 current), and Haraka (tens of servers, 7 current). ...


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Restrictions specified in restriction lists such as smtpd_helo_restrictions, smtpd_recipient_restrictions etc. are applied in the order as specified; the first restriction that matches wins. Since your smtp_recipient_restrictions has permit_sasl_authenticated as first condition and check_recipient_access somewhere down the road, any authenticated client is ...


3

There is likely a mismatch between the ciphers that are supported by your server, and those supported by the recipient's server. On a given connection, once the initiating server attempts to STARTTLS, there's no going back. (It doesn't have to necessarily attempt STARTTLS, but once it does, the state of the connection is forever altered.) If the mismatch ...


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FYI, 454 4.7.1 <someemail@example.com: Relay access denied; was the result of defer_unauth_destination. It's slightly different with reject_unauth_destination, with reject means permanent error with code 550 and defer means temporary error with code 450. But wait..., I don't have any parameter that use defer_unauth_destination. Where does the weird ...


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That idiosyncratic and invalid EHLO argument "ylmf-pc" is a known fingerprint of a widespread spamming botnet known as "PushDo" (and sometimes alternatively "Cutwail"). As shown in your transcript, it is mostly trying password guessing to authenticate and send mail through your server. Keeping it from sending spam to or through your server is easy, because ...


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The helo name of the attacker is invalid (ylmf-pc) because it's neither a FQDN, nor resolvable via DNS, so you can easily get rid of it earlier, by blocking him after the invalid EHLO is sent. To do this with postfix, for example, do: smtpd_helo_restrictions = permit_mynetworks, check_helo_access reject_invalid_helo_hostname, reject_non_fqdn_helo_hostname, ...


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Configuring a relay connector to allow the proxy SMTP server to relay through Exchange doesn't make Exchange an open relay. Many organizations configure and use relay connectors in Exchange for applications, web servers, log servers, etc. But I'm not really understanding the problem. Why is the SMTP proxy trying to send email to Exchange for the non-local ...


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Use the right tool for the job. Gmail is not that. Gmail is meant for normal, human users and the normal email usage pattern that goes with that. Use a purpose-built email service like Amazon SES, Mandrill, etc., and you'll have much better results without having to resort to hackery.


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Question is not clear: If you wish send e-mail to google - it's completly enought to set alias in postfix pointed to google account. For example: account: account@gmail.com It will forward any mail sent to account@$localdomail to account@gmail.com Alternativly - if you wish forward e-mail via google (you wish to send e-mail to internet using gmail ...


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The left-side menu is gone in all modern browsers. Wrote a quick guide how to get it to down again... http://heineborn.com/tech/hp-power-manager-website-is-broke/


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<bot>Convert comment to CW</bot> Detailed step by step was taken from this blog Download and extract script from this page. From the README file: These scripts get your AWS access key ID and secret access key from environment variables. The procedure for setting environment variables depends on your operating system. You need to do the ...


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I had the same issue after switching email service from one host to another (new one is Office 365). After lots of trial and error, it finally started working by doing this: Add my email domain to IIS 6 as a "remote" domain. (This is the domain that is hosted in O365 and all user accounts use.) In IIS 6, double-click that domain; under "Route domain" ...


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OK, I found it: First of all, the issue was not JIRA-specific, but just any DNS lookup from the guest or host failed. The root cause of this was the host firewall missing rules to accept all incoming packets belonging or related to already established connections. This applies to all ports, not just 53, as port 53 is the incoming port on the DNS server, but ...


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So, I did extensive testing with all of the SMTP relay providers (ESPs) above. So to sum up the requirements: ESP has multi-tenant features, such as subaccounts and containing misbehaviour within a subaccount. My customer (end-user with own domain) shouldn't be bothered with manual domain or address verification procedures to enable the delivery of mail. ...


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I suggest you create a dedicated "Frontend Transport" receive connector for this, assign correct permissions as outlined here.


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Postfix itself has documentation about how to debug when something goes wrong. For debugging postfix process, the maillog was your friend. The first step of debugging is issuing this command egrep '(warning|error|fatal|panic):' /some/log/file | more From the maillog we can see that postfix complain about bad net/mask pattern: "192.168.3.0/255". From your ...


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If you don't want to use SES or the like (which is what I'd recommend, even for small volumes), then another alternative is to stand up your own mail relay outside the cloud provider, on a non-blacklisted IP and have your servers relay through that. I've had good luck with Linode - I've never landed on a blacklisted IP there. If you do this, make sure that ...


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I don't know why you'd want postfix or exim for relaying your mails, but if you don't depend on them, you could also look into sSMTP. Quite easy to configure and very lightweight.


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On a purely theoretical level it would be possible to do so using SRV records but what prevents this from being applicable to your problem is that MTAs only make use of MX and address records (A/AAAA). Ie, in practice no one would look up your SRV record if you added one. In effect SRV can be seen as a generalised and extended version of the MX record type ...


0

I figured it out! On my old server everything was through port 25. Turns out that now I have to go through 587 for the SASL to work, so when I was sending from the configured domains, it worked on 25, but the non-configured ones have to go through 587


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No. The MX mechanism does not grant the ability to provide mail service on alternative port numbers @wikipedia


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Exchange server 2010 (which is the version of Exchange in SBS 2011) doesn't use the SMTP service. It uses the Microsoft Exchange Transport service. Disable that service and you should be OK.



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