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2

You are right about the storage requirements for snapshots vs clones, with clones requiring the full size of the volume vs snapshots which start out zero sized and will grow as changes are made to the underlying disk (up to the size of the snapshot reserve). Since you are using the default snapshot reserve of 100%, each snapshot will appear to be occupying ...


0

Highlight the base volume in Group Manager. In the right-pane, you can see the Volume Space and Snapshot Space sections. The Volume Space section will tell you the reported size of the base volume, how much is free, how much is in-use, whether the volume is thin or thick, and the volume reserve. The Snapshot Space section will tell you the snapshot ...


0

The documentation is confusing. It seems to me that lvcreate --merge means revert all changes, and lvremove means commit the changes. The distinction is in how you use it. In most cases, you're just using the snapshot as a read only frozen point in time copy of the live volume, and the live volume keeps changing. In this case, if you merge, logically that ...


1

Yes ZFS snapshoting works well for that, with no performance penalty for adding them as you please. (also easy to replicate for backup, etc) However there isn't any coordination with vmware though so you do need to remove and re-add them to the inventory manually when you revert snapshots. Whether it is a particularly good solution for you depends very much ...


4

ewwhite's answer is correct, but just to expand a bit more or the performance penalty, consider the following scenario: You create a VM. A virtual read from the vmdk takes one physical disk read of the same size. Fairly straightforward. Now imagine you take a snapshot of the VM. Now, for every virtual read, you're going to incur 2 physical reads, one from ...


14

Yes, there are performance implications for long-running snapshots. There are even greater implications for consolidating delta VMDKs back to the original disk file. This can cause unresponsiveness in your VM's operating system or other undesirable behavior. VMware has templating and cloning functionality built into vCenter. You need a $600 vSphere ...


1

This doesn't sound like an ideal application for Git. Git isn't oriented toward storing large binary files. You might look at the git-annex project, which uses Git for version control of binary files, but doesn't actually store the binaries in Git. If you're just talking about dynamically swapping a hierarchy of directories and files you could do this ...


0

At this time, backup and restore is supported only for clusters running Redis. Backup and restore is not supported on cache.t1.* and cache.t2.* instance types. User Guide (API Version 2014-09-30): http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonElastiCache/latest/UserGuide/ManagingSnapshots.html


2

I think that the root of this question is that there are two fundamentally different methods of doing snapshots. A VMWare snapshot means that is halts writes to its primary disk and instead puts all writes into a separate snapshot disk. Reverting to this snapshot means discarding all the writes since it was taken (which causes very little overhead), ...


3

Don't focus on snapshots. It's clouding your judgment :) VMware has templating and cloning functionality built into vCenter. You need a $600 vSphere Essentials license to enable this. You can create a VM to your taste, then clone it to a template. That template can then be used to generate new virtual machines. This allows you to have a "clean state" but ...



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