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9

ZFS is likely using most of your memory as ARC cache. Should you want to know how your RAM is used, run this command as root: # echo ::memstat | mdb -k On Solaris 10 10/09 and newer, this displays something like this: Page Summary Pages MB %Tot ------------ ---------------- ---------------- ---- Kernel ...


8

Absent other factors (known bugs that affect your environment/planned environment, vendor/software requirements, existing corporate environment, etc.), install the latest version of the OS you intend to use.


6

I realize that this is an old thread, but in case someone stumbles across it, it is worth noting that this appears to now be possible in Solaris 11: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23824_01/html/821-1453/gexkw.html#gexnc There is now a '-I' option that allows snoop to work with IP-layer devices.


6

Yes, they were removed, by the IP Datapath Refactoring project described in this mail thread from the architecture review.


5

The route command has the -p option, in OpenSolaris and I believe Solaris 10 as well. From man route: -p Make changes to the network route tables per- sistent across system restarts. The operation is applied to the network routing tables first and, if successful, is then applied to ...


5

To get a POSIX environment on Solaris, you need to put the standard conformance directory (/usr/xpg6/bin, the number can be different in different Solaris versions) early in your PATH, before /usr/bin or /bin. There is a POSIX-conforming sh in there (it's ksh, in fact), and a few utilities react differently depending on $PATH even though they come in a ...


5

SPARC VII processors have 4 cores and Simultaneous MultiThreading (SMT) which allows them to run 8 threads simultaneously. L1 cache is 128Kb per core and L2 cache is 6Mb per CPU chip there is no L3 cache. 8 CPUs will allow for simultaneous execution of 64 threads. You appear to be getting threads and cores confused. Each CPU contains 4 cores. Each core ...


5

It looks as though your pool, tank, is comprised of four disks in a striped configuration; e.g. RAID-0 with no redundancy. Try bringing the disk back online (reseat it, if it's hot-pluggable), check its connections. Run the zpool online command, as given in the error message. See what happens. Short of that, I don't believe there's a way to get a listing of ...


5

find /proc/*/fd -ls 2> /dev/null | grep '(deleted)' Find all opened file descriptors. Grep deleted. StdError to /dev/null Output: 160448715 0 lrwx------ 1 user user 64 Nov 29 15:34 /proc/28680/fd/113 -> /tmp/vteT3FWPX\ (deleted) Or you can use awk find /proc/*/fd -ls 2> /dev/null | awk '/deleted/ {print $11}'; awk output(...


4

The posts are correct, you cannot snoop loopback traffic on solaris. You can't tcpdump it, you can't wireshark it. You can't dtrace it. Many have tried. OpenSolaris supports it (via the clearview project).


4

I do not like the instructions on the opensystems blog you pointed to, as it replaces the default service in SMF. This is bad as it is likely that a future system patch will revert your changes. Here's my take on it, from a default system state: Disable the system syslog: svcadm disable system-log Download and install (using pkgadd) syslog-ng from ...


4

Given your ZFS encryption requirement, your only choice is Solaris 11 Express. Solaris 10 doesn't support ZFS encryption and probably never will.


4

It's getting "too localized" here, but anyway: http://www.coniugo.com/ still offer RS232-capable GSM modems. I bought a USB version from Conrad, and I guess they ship to the UK. Beside that, maybe it's possible to use a web based SMS service for your normal notifications and use the Nokia exclusively for Nagios notifications (so Nagios will reach you ...


4

NFS 4.1 (minor 1) is designed to be a faster and more efficient protocol and is recommended over previous versions, especially 4.0. This includes client-side caching, and although not relevant in this scenario, parallel-NFS (pNFS). The major change is that is that the protocol is now stateful. http://www.netapp.com/us/communities/tech-ontap/nfsv4-0408....


4

The memory is filled with unmapped pages of data read from disk. It's kept in memory because those files may be read again and keeping the data in memory saves a disk read. Free memory is forever wasted, so the computer tries to keep as little of it as possible. For example, say you run a program. The program terminates. The program is still in memory, but ...


4

Here is a simple exemple with less: let's assume we have a file my10MBfile $ dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/my10MBfile bs=1M count=10 10+0 enregistrements lus 10+0 enregistrements écrits 10485760 octets (10 MB) copiés, 0,0454491 s, 231 MB/s $ ls -l /tmp/my10MBfile -rw-r--r-- 1 max max 10485760 avril 23 22:49 /tmp/my10MBfile $ df -m /tmp /dev/disk/by-uuid/...


4

uptime gets its information from a date stored in memory when the system boots. After a system restore the kernel starts with new information. However the last information comes from a file, e.g. /var/log/wtmp, and was recovered with the restore, revealing the last information at the time the system was initially backuped.


3

In Solaris 10 you can use passwd -f <username> command to do this if you are using the files or nisplus repositories. Manpage here # passwd -f user2 passwd: password information changed for user2 At next login user2 will get this. Connected to localhost. Escape character is '^]'. login: user2 Password: Choose a new password. New Password:


3

It really depends on what you're doing with that data. If the data gets used later as inputs to shell commands then you can just sneak in commands that subshell and execute arbitrary commands (install backdoor, add user, change passwords...) If the data gets inserted into SQL without prepared statements, then you have a standard SQL injection. The ...


3

On older-solaris, the load-average is the average number of runnable and running threads. In other words, it is the number of threads running on the CPUs, plus the number of threads in the run queue, waiting for CPUs, averaged over time. So... a CPU that completed processing 10 threads for the last second... and had 5 more waiting to be processed would ...


3

You already have the solution. Use dd inside solaris to do this on each filesystem dd if=/dev/zero of=file.iso bs=1M count=<the amount of free space you have in megabytes> You will likely run out of space for a few seconds at the very end of the file creation, as soon as you get your disk full error, delete the file, shutdown the machine and image ...


3

It may not be zfs - you have lots of free memory, so consider this possibility - echo 'pg_contig_disable/D' | mdb -k If the output is: echo pg_contig_disable/D | mdb -k pg_contig_disable: pg_contig_disable: 0 You may be experiencing a sort of NUMA issue. Solaris 10 tries to facilitate faster memory access by setting up blocks of memory for ...


3

There is no reason to change /home permission, and especially setting them to 0777 would introduce a major security vulnerability. You probably want to create a regular home directory for a new user. By default, Solaris is configured to have that directory stored on a shared location automounted by multiple OS instances with NFS. /home is the mount point ...


3

Use showmount: /usr/sbin/showmount -a


2

See: need high performance /bin/sort; any suggestions?


2

Here is the script I wrote for this purpose. On a 4 processor machine it improved the sort performance by 100% ! (Thanks Bash for the tip!) #! /bin/ksh MAX_LINES_PER_CHUNK=1000000 ORIGINAL_FILE=$1 SORTED_FILE=$2 CHUNK_FILE_PREFIX=$ORIGINAL_FILE.split. SORTED_CHUNK_FILES=$CHUNK_FILE_PREFIX*.sorted usage () { echo Parallel sort echo usage: psort ...


2

Something very similar is a well known security mistake many websites make. If you take uploads from users (say, avatar images for a forum) and don't verify that they are actally valid image files, an attacker can upload a PHP file instead and execute it on your server by requesting it in a web browser from your images directory. It is often not adequate ...


2

1.) Check if Disk /dev/dsk/c2t0d0s2 exists you can use the format command to check 2.) If yes, does it have a ufs file system ? You can refer to http://www.softpanorama.org/Solaris/Disks_and_filesystems/solaris_ufs.shtml


2

From here: The hostname command should return an FQDN... ... The solution is to edit /etc/nodename and put the FQDN in there and reboot. echo foo.your.domain.com > /etc/nodename You might also be able to use: getent hosts `hostname` | cut -f 3 or similar.


2

Your method depends upon the /etc/hosts file being formatted in a particular way, on a S10 system I have to hand it returns loghost which is incorrect. If set up you can ask the DNS system with dig -x your.ip.add.ress +short or if you are using NIS then echo `hostname`.`domainname` or you could setup /etc/nodename as Dennis suggests.



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