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8

Absent other factors (known bugs that affect your environment/planned environment, vendor/software requirements, existing corporate environment, etc.), install the latest version of the OS you intend to use.


6

You should have more RAM in the system. Pointers to L2ARC need to be kept in RAM (ARC), so I think you'd need around 4GB or 6GB of RAM to better utilize the ~60GB of L2ARC you have available. This is from a recent thread on the ZFS list: http://opensolaris.org/jive/thread.jspa?threadID=131296 L2ARC is "secondary" ARC. ZFS attempts to cache all reads in ...


5

Yes, they were removed, by the IP Datapath Refactoring project described in this mail thread from the architecture review.


5

The reason is, unlike Linux, ifconfig without options isn't a valid command under Solaris. The equivalent command would be ifconfig -a. If you run it without options, ifconfig displays a help message on its standard error stream. To have it paginated, simply use: ifconfig 2>&1 | less By the way, ifconfig is somewhat obsolete under Solaris 11. I ...


4

Given your ZFS encryption requirement, your only choice is Solaris 11 Express. Solaris 10 doesn't support ZFS encryption and probably never will.


4

Unfortunately I cannot solve your problem, but here's some background information: The ARC target size does not seem to be a fix value. I experience the same problem on a Solaris 11 machine and after each reboot, at some point the target size seems to lock in at a value between ~100 and ~500MB. At least 3 other people are facing the same issue, as ...


4

This is a known bug in gpg2 in Solaris 11.0 (aka Solaris 11 11/11), originally filed as Sun bug 7098984, now known as bug 15747076 in the Oracle bug tracking system [Oracle support account required to view]. It’s fixed in Solaris 11.1 and later releases. For Solaris 11.0, this workaround helps in some cases (but not if you're using pfexec/sudo/etc.): env ...


3

It looks a lot like raidctl has established some sort of raid on them already and handing the OS a single raided target. Does the output of raidctl and raidctl -l c2t3d0 confirm this? If so, youll want to remove this raided with raidctl -d c2t3d0 Then cfgadm -al will hopefully give you your 2 devices without rebooting.


2

That HBA port is connected to a target port, just disconnect it for a moment, reset it then reconnect. Don't know what's the easiest way for you to do this as I don't know your SAN design but I'd imagine a port shutdown on your switch might be the easiest/quickest way.


2

I can however just boot to the default Solaris 11/11 kernel and auth again just fine ... so boot to that kernel and undo the damage you did to /etc/nsswitch.conf. Problem solved. This will cost you five dollars, Charlie Brown. If your system is hosed to the point where you can't log in boot it in single user mode and fix the file.


2

You can go the SmartOS route, which is really a KVM virtualization port. The other approach is an all-in-one setup using another hypervisor, like VMWare ESXi and a ZFS-based OS. I use NexentaStor, but OpenIndiana works just as well.


2

Solaris Zones are useful for service isolation, but each of the "vms" are going to be running solaris, so you can't run windows or a few linux applications. What you need to be using is Joyent's SmartOS. They are an Open Solaris fork with some of the main Solaris devs working on them. They ported KVM to their kernel and have tools to support running KVM ...


2

S11 contains LDoms 2.1 which is not supported on T1 hardware (the last version supported on T1 is LDoms 1.2 - see [1]). In this specific case we suggest you remove the IPS version of the LDoms manager, then download and install the SVR4 package for LDoms 1.2 (in general, on all other platforms, it's better to install the IPS package on S11 as you get ...


2

It's quite possible to host a virtual guest with a passthrough controller, but it's not possible to boot from one. I've documented this configuration here in the past. I don't think this question would appeal to a large audience, though. This is a pretty esoteric request. The purpose of the passthrough controller is to provide dedicated access to a ...


2

Solaris should detect the CPU features on boot, you could always check if you are running 32 or 64 bit with isainfo -b. ZFS can be configured to automatically expand a pool in case it sees bigger drives than it previously used. This can be useful if you want to upgrade the storage capacity in a server running either a mirror or RAIDZ(2). Just replace one ...


2

Since the answer body has to be at least 30 symbols, I need to write some stuff here, even the totally dull one, though netstat -aun or even man netstat would be enough.


1

Try booting with -B disable-ixgbe=true. Here's more on adding kernel arguments in GRUB: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E26502_01/html/E28983/glyas.html


1

The session you quote has a clue in the error message Type required for new properties. It looks like you're missing a required type parameter and the Documentation has more information # svccfg -s system/name-service/switch svc:/system/name-service/switch> setprop config/host = astring: "files dns nis" svc:/system/name-service/switch> quit ...


1

It looks like the makefile is trying to use -x04 which is an optimization flag for Solaris cc compiler. However, since you're using gcc and not Solaris cc, gcc doesn't understand the flag and thus doesn't know how to compile main.o for you. In other words, it should work if you use the Solaris cc to compile instead of gcc. If you do want to use gcc, make ...


1

If by "booting to another kernel" you mean booting to an alternate Boot Environment (BE), then boot to that kernel, use 'beadm list' to determine which boot environment is the one you need to fix, and mount it. beadm mount beName mountpoint For example, if your broken boot environment is "solaris-2", and you have a working "solaris-1" boot ...


1

What version of LDOM software did you install. # pkg info ldomsmanager T2000 support only version 1.2 (or is 1.3 ?) but absolutely not versions 2.0/2.1 or 2.2


1

found with find / |grep gdm It's in /etc/gdm. for xdmcp it should suffice to write enable=true under [xdmcp] in custom.conf.


1

They changed the kstats. Oracle Solaris 11 has removed the following statistics from zfs:0:arcstats: evict_l2_cached evict_l2_eligible evict_l2_ineligible evict_skip hdr_size l2_free_on_write l2_size recycle_miss and added the following to zfs:0:arcstats: buf_size meta_limit meta_max meta_used So this could basically just be a problem with your ...


1

I appear to have solved this. I disabled Intel VT-d and Intel Virtualization in the BIOS, and all seems to work now.


1

Is the daemon fiddling with privileges? Have you tried to run the daemon with privilege debug enabled? Note that if you remove certain privileges, you need to start with "basic"; over time, the set of basic privileges will grow and current unprivileged operations will start to need a new basic privilege; in Solaris 11 we have added file_write, file_read ...


1

Please note that Solaris 11 has not been released but that should happen until the end of this year (or sooner). With that in mind, your options are Solaris 10 and Solaris 11 Express. Both are supported in production and will require you to buy a license. So I'm assuming that's not a problem. Since you're asking which one to use, I'm also assuming your ...


1

Q1: The server will have four disks. I suppose I'll have to use one exclusively for the system. Is that right? R1: No, the system doesn't require a whole disk, a slice in a primary partition (or even extended) would be sufficient. That said, using a mirror for the system is recommended. Q2: What if that disk dies, will it take with it all the data of the ...


1

If you want to preserve the disks for actual storage, you could use one or two SATA DOM's (disk-on-modules) in a mirrored setup to free your drive bays. This assumes you have SATA ports available directly on the motherboard. This is a clean approach. Another option is using slices and carving out a root pool distributed across two of your disks. This is ...


1

Patches, i.e. partial packages bundles, as they were available with Solaris 10 and older are no more built or available with IPS (Image Packaging System) introduced with Solaris 11 Express (and OpenSolaris before). The new way is to replace full packages. A system can be updated to the latest version (or SRUs service repository updates) with the pkg update ...


1

You can fetch patches with the pkg command. However, you first need to add a repository and certificate. Your Oracle rep will no doubt provide you with information on how to do this. Patches are not available without a support contract, which is the reason there is per definition an Oracle rep involved...



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