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Any recommendations on other alternative ways to prevent brute force of ssh? Change the port SSH runs on. Brute force attempts are largely done against port 22. $ sudo grep ^Port /etc/ssh/sshd_config Port 10022 Limit the users that are allowed to connect, for example: $ sudo grep ^AllowUsers /etc/ssh/sshd_config AllowUsers dannix AllowUsers ...


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I have my project ID set to the same as the group for oracle, but as you don't need to have them match for it to take effect. I just do it so I know that project belongs to that group


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To check if bash package is installed try this command (verified on Solaris 10): pkginfo -l SUNWbash It may be also installed from 3rd-party software repository, then, try: pkginfo | grep -i bash


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I don't have a Solaris system to hand but it appears that the script is relying on /bin/sh being a link to /bin/bash and as such is using bash syntax that sh doesn't understand. As you've discovered changing the shebang to #!/bin/bash fixes the problem. You should submit a bug report and hopefully the maintainers will fix it to be less Linux centric.


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The solution suggested by Gene requires that you know who's going to connect from where. If that fits your need then you should go with that. It is simple. No matter what you should always disable root logins in your SSH daemon. (on Solaris 11 onwards logging into box from outside as root wouldn't be possible anyway (because root has become a role, not a ...


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If bash is installed the follwing will state which version you have, otherwise thorw an error /usr/bin/bash --version


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Maybe I'm oversimplifying this but have you tried typing "bash" at the command prompt?


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Have you downloaded the patches from MOS? If not go search and download both the prereq patch and then the actual bash fix, then unzip them somewhere then do the following; this is for Sparc, use the others listed in the linked post for x86: patchadd path/to/prereq/unzip/126546-05 Then do this: patachadd path/to/fix/unzip/19689287 That's what I did on ...


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In real-time? If not, then you could just use tcpdump to a file and then copy the resulting file locally where you can view it with something like Wireshark. Or you could just use tcpdump -X ... or tcpdump -A ... to see the actual live packets (it won't decode the SSL header fields. There is also a command-line tool called ssldump which can capture the ...



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