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19

There are a few ways of fixing this: You can disable host key checking for this particular host. In your ssh_config file (~/.ssh/config), put something like: Host remote.host.name UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null StrictHostkeyChecking no This configures ssh to never store host keys for remote.host.name, but the downside is that now you are open to ...


8

The hostname or IP address is being stored as a hash (or in plain text depending on options and version defaults) in your known_hosts file. The easiest workaround is to add an entry for each host to DNS or /etc/hosts (ugh!) file with the same IP (WAN) address such as in /etc/hosts: your.wan.ip.address servera serverb and then ssh by hostname and ...


6

You don't say which version of Solaris (and, more importantly, SSH) you're using, but sufficiently up-to-date versions of OpenSSH have addressed this problem. Here are two entries from my known_hosts file, which have the same IP address but different port numbers (one is the implicit 22); as you can see the stored keys are not the same. [10.69.55.47]:2222 ...


4

There is no file that contains this history. Perhaps you may be able to pull it out of syslog, but you're going to have to go searching for it.


3

I don't think you can easily do what you want to do on such an ancient1 system. I don't think this will work but you could try echo "password\npassword" | passwd user You could try to use the expect utility. This will do what you want and there are plenty of example scripts on how to change a password using it. The trouble is it may not be natively part ...


2

On Solaris (or any POSIX system), you can use: nawk 'BEGIN{srand(); print srand()}'


1

You could try adding -t to your plink command line as passwd is interactive and needs a tty. Most passwd implementations* only allow root to specify a username perhaps you need to use either plink.exe -t root@ip.add.re.ss -pw password "passwd user" or if your command is a true reflection of what you're attempting then and the user in both cases is the ...


1

You can easily do this in two ways: a) create an SSH key without passphrase, and deploy the public key to B b) create an SSH key with passphrase, load it once into ssh-agent on boot and make the connection to B use this agent. This is more secure than the first option. Links: a) http://hortonworks.com/kb/generating-ssh-keys-for-passwordless-login/ b) ...


1

You could use the passwd utility in particular passwd -e may be helpful Changes the login shell. For the files repository, this only works for the super-user. Normal users may change the ldap, nis, or nisplus repositories. The choice of shell is limited by the requirements of getusershell(3C). If the user currently has a shell that is not allowed by ...



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