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3

I don't think you can easily do what you want to do on such an ancient1 system. I don't think this will work but you could try echo "password\npassword" | passwd user You could try to use the expect utility. This will do what you want and there are plenty of example scripts on how to change a password using it. The trouble is it may not be natively part ...


1

You could try adding -t to your plink command line as passwd is interactive and needs a tty. Most passwd implementations* only allow root to specify a username perhaps you need to use either plink.exe -t root@ip.add.re.ss -pw password "passwd user" or if your command is a true reflection of what you're attempting then and the user in both cases is the ...


1

You could use the passwd utility in particular passwd -e may be helpful Changes the login shell. For the files repository, this only works for the super-user. Normal users may change the ldap, nis, or nisplus repositories. The choice of shell is limited by the requirements of getusershell(3C). If the user currently has a shell that is not allowed by ...


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You can easily do this in two ways: a) create an SSH key without passphrase, and deploy the public key to B b) create an SSH key with passphrase, load it once into ssh-agent on boot and make the connection to B use this agent. This is more secure than the first option. Links: a) http://hortonworks.com/kb/generating-ssh-keys-for-passwordless-login/ b) ...


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You are looking for a single-sign-on (SSO) setup. I have not personally done an ssh SSO configuration, but I found a few links that look decent: Red Hat docs, an RHEL blog post, and one from another Linux distribution (this last one is the most step-by-step of the three). Hope one of those helps!


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I found the answer - the Java package for Solaris is 'zone aware' so you can update Java to the latest version on the global zone and it will also update Java on the other running zones.


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I was able to 'recover' from this incident by zfs 'send'ing and receiving the corrupt pool to a new pool. # create new single disk pool (or a mirror in advance if you wish) zpool create -f tpool c0d0s0 # make a baseline snapshot of the old pool zfs snapshot -r rpool@now # zfs send it to the new tpool zfs send -vR rpool@now | zfs receive -Fduv tpool # ...


4

There is no file that contains this history. Perhaps you may be able to pull it out of syslog, but you're going to have to go searching for it.


2

On Solaris (or any POSIX system), you can use: nawk 'BEGIN{srand(); print srand()}'


1

If this really is a concern you're going to have to write something yourself as, as the man page suggests it's not built in. You could write a wrapper for crontab(1) that did the locking/lock checking before running crontab(1) itself. In this answer I suggest a file locking method using mkdir. This whole idea doesn't seem like a trivial undertaking ...



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