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34

It was purchased before 1993 by Weinstein & DePaolis, and subsequently sold to Paypal (or the company was bought out). In 1993 IANA reserved all remaining single letter second-level domains, and grandfathered the ones already issued. Other functional, corporate examples domains are t.co (Twitter) and q.com (Qwest). I hate to cite Wikipedia as a ...


28

There's no telecommunication difference (e.g. noise, crimping, termination), just the sheathing. The difference is an electrical code safety issue. Regular network cable (i.e. non-plenum) is flammable, can catch fire, can spread fire, and emit toxic fumes when burning. Plenum quality cable is required for use if you run your cable in air handling spaces ...


14

There are a few thresholds out there for 'too much', though they're special cases. In 32-bit land, PAE is what allows you to access memory over the 4GB line. The theoretical max for 32-bit machines is 64GB of RAM, which reflects the extra 4 bits PAE gives memory addresses. 64GB is less than 80GB. From there we get processor-specific issues. 64-bit ...


9

He was blowing smoke - if he'd said 4GB and you were using 32-bit operating systems then he might have had half of an argument but no, 80GB is just a number he's pulled out of the air. Obviously there are some problems if memory isn't 'bought wisely', for instance larger DIMMs usually cost more than twice the price of the half-size versions (i.e. 16GB DIMMS ...


5

Belarc Advisor Running the advisor on a PC will generate a report to a web browser. Details cover both hardware and software of the machine with a very useful amount of detail (such as license keys for some software). From that point you could have them print the page to PDF if they have something such as Adobe Acrobat or a 3rd party pdf printer ...


5

I cannot urge you more strongly - GET THE X3440 FOR THE EXTRA £40/$WHATEVER!!! - the X3430 is the only bin of that chip that has hyperthreading switched off - it's really worth the extra. Now your question - get neither the 8GB nor the 16GB options - go for the 12GB - Nehalem's are optimised for blocks of 3 memory modules at a time (i.e 3 x 4GB). This ...


5

Since we're extremely short on details: Run a test server in a development/VM environment and extrapolate.


5

If I were you, especially when starting out, I would look at leasing a virtual server that you can pay more or less for based on your resource usage & bandwidth usage. Once you have some real world statistics to use for trending you can use them to decide if/when moving away from cloud hosting is a sensible thing to do.


4

The complement is taken to make checksum validation simpler — instead of calculating the checksum again and then comparing the calculated value with the checksum field in the header (which is in the middle of the summed data), it is possible to sum (using one's complement arithmetic) all 16-bit words in the header (including the checksum word) and compare ...


4

Looks like you're planning another fun ZFS project, Sandra :) For some clarity on SAS topology and the different methods of connecting devices, please see my post at: How exactly does a SAS SFF-8087 breakout cable work? + RAID/connection questions As for the LSI SAS 9206-16e controller you're looking at, the device is very simple. "16e" stands for ...


4

Carp is an open standard for server clustering, that can do failover. It's mostly a BSD thing, but most unixes can use ucarp. VRRP is the general IETF standard, but is designed more for routers than application servers.


4

It is everything on the partition that is mounted as /. It is quite common to have seperate partitions mounted for locations like /var, /tmp , /usr etc. Example, /bin contains programs important for starting/recovering the system, It should be on the root filesystem while /usr/bin doesn't and can be on a seperate (possibly remote) file system.


4

I have about the same specs as you (I have an AMD Athlon XP) and it runs just fine with Apache, SSH and MySQL. You should be fine if only you are going to be connecting. You'll have problems if a lot of people are on it.


3

You can use a wildcard certificate with multiple subdomains across multiple IP addresses. While there is no technical limitation, often Certificate Authorities have licensing restrictions on thier usage.


3

Take it to an extreme and say you have Petabytes of memory: The system (cpu) is not going to work harder to manage memory mappings. The OS should be smart enough to consume this memory for disk caching, and still have plenty to manage application space (memory and code). Mapping memory in RAM vs virtual space will consume the same amount of CPU cycles. ...


3

OK. First, to address the specific questions/issues raised. 1- I think the hardware is sufficient, although it is hard to extrapolate a load from the question. I would get the best server I can afford. 2- Yes, get a second (identical) drive for RAID1; I would buy it with the server. How it works depends on the RAID controller; most likely there is a ...


3

Yes, you have correctly determined what hardware is in your server. Windows Server really is not significantly different from the client OS.


3

Obviously you don't mention what the server's role is but it's highly unlikely that the GPU will be of any benefit whatsoever over the most basic card you could get - server OS's almost never make use of anything but a basic frame-buffer. Also that's not a server motherboard, it's for a top-end workstation, try to pick one that's designed to be in a server. ...


3

The common approach would be to examine the tree major possible bottlenecks "CPU power", "disk I/O performance" and "memory requirements", to estimate the approximate need for your specific case for each of them and to over-engineer by a degree to make you comfortable (which is a bit non-scientific, but of course would need an educated guess including ...


3

I would not . Seriously. You call a desktop with one 500gb disc a file server? Can I call that a carp little desktop, please. Memory, discs are ok. The main problem I see is that you sould pretty much get out, get a NAS with 4-8 bays an d be happy with that. Something with RAID, multiple discs and able to SERVE FILES. 30 users hitting one disc is "slow" as ...


3

i would recommend you to start with Big (Amazon load balancer with 2 large instances, and then if resources are still free after heavy load, then you can scale down after that. because, if you start with small instance, and if it failed to pick the load (which has large chance) then users will face downtime (when you will be upgrading to to medium or large ...


2

Question 1 - it depends what they are writing and reading throughout the day, the volume of data, the nature of the application(s) served by the database etc. If by 'business user' you mean this would be a database server supporting an internal business app used by 2000 users (e.g. a call centre CRM application supporting 2000 seats where response time is ...


2

cat /proc/meminfo will only show data from within your VM. cat /proc/cpuinfo generally will show the real data from the host system, but depending on the virtualization methods used and the hosts's configuration, there's nothing stopping the hypervisor from modifying the data it presents to your VM.


2

It might be because a value of all zeros is meaningful (from RFC 793): While computing the checksum, the checksum field itself is replaced with zeros. so it can preserve this meaning against the unlikely event that the checksum really is zero.


2

The connectors are identical. Each connector has 4 SAS lanes. Each lane supports 6 Gb/s, but the total bandwidth that the chipset can handle over 4 lanes bonded together is 2400 MB/s, which works out to about 18 Gb/s (about 6 Gb/s less that the total available bandwidth). The port configuration describes how you are allowed to hook up the devices. The ...


2

I don't see it going away any time soon under Microsoft's umbrella - deprecating anything that businesses are using is something they avoid. On the IETF draft, don't worry much about it; Microsoft's rarely interested in working through the open standards process for technologies that come from under their roof, but in this case it became a de-facto standard ...


2

I am not sure how the documents would normally be structured, but in this scenario I would think documenting the following is appropriate... administrative usernames and passwords guidelines for creating new accounts (e.g. naming conventions) changes you made to MX records changes you made to DNS cautionary statements about making changes to DNS if they ...


2

We tend to hand over build guides - if it contains a systematic description of how to build the system from scratch, it's probably got all the essential details. Add an FAQ or links to Google's howtos, and you should be fine.


2

Technet is usually a good place to start with this sort of specing exercise. Assuming that you are looking at exchange 2010 then this link will help out.


2

What we use at my office for this purpose is PCWizard: http://www.cpuid.com/pcwizard.php It's free as in beer, and works very well.



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