Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

It looks like your domain registrar does not allow you the flexibility to name your text records, or place them into subdomains. You should contact their support team to either see if they can name the record for you. Alternatively, you could set up your own DNS server, or utilize a free DNS hosting service on the net (you can find some quickly by ...


1

It sounds like what they expect you to add is a record like the following (as written in the normal master file format): _amazonses IN TXT "the-very-special-key" You don't specify what this management tool that you refer to offers in terms of UI but the name where you want to add the record is _amazonses (if specified as relative to the zone), the type is ...


0

Primarily the problem is theirs, but partially yours also. On the remote side, they have implemented sender address verification, and since you are doing SRS, it's possible that postfix will not reply favorably to a probe for the re-written sender address (or for ANY sender address verification probe). You should probably be able to see the probe in your ...


3

SPF does not work well with email forwarding. The receiving server (Gmail in this case) verifies that the IP address of the SMTP server sending it the mail is authorised in the SPF record of the sender address's domain. If you have a forwarding server (hmailserver in this case) in the middle, it's unlikely that server's IP address is going to be ...


0

Sender ID tries to be backwards compatible and can use spf1 records. There is a whole controversy going on around this which I'm not getting into here (see: http://www.openspf.org/SPF_vs_Sender_ID). In any case, if you choose a scope other than "both" in the wizard it will create spf2 records. Otherwise it will only generate a backwards compatible spf1 ...


2

SPF is not failing. You're misinterpreting the results. Google is doing the check (properly) when the mail is sent to the GMail account. Google is also adding the check when it retrieves via POP3. It doesn't know where it came from, therefore it marks a softfail. I'm not sure why Google is checking for a POP3 retrieved email, but it shouldn't be. You ...


2

You can only have one SPF record. Since you created four of them, which one actually gets used is essentially random. You should combine them together into a single record.


3

You can only have one SPF record. You need to combine them like so: v=spf1 include:spf.mandrillapp.com include:spf.protection.outlook.com -all or v=spf1 include:spf.mandrillapp.com include:spf.protection.outlook.com ?all


1

Both libspf2 (C) and Mail::SPF::Query (perl, used in sendmail-spf-milter) implement a limit of 10 DNS-causing mechanisms, but the latter does not (AFAICT) apply the MX or PTR limits. libspf2 limits each of mx and ptr to 10 also. Mail::SPF (perl) has a limit of 10 DNS mechanisms, and a limit of 10 lookups per mechanism, per MX and per PTR. (The two perl ...


2

RFC4408 s10.1 does, as you have noted, put some limits on DNS activity. Specifically: SPF implementations MUST limit the number of mechanisms and modifiers that do DNS lookups to at most 10 per SPF check, including any lookups caused by the use of the "include" mechanism or the "redirect" modifier. If this number is exceeded during a check, a ...



Top 50 recent answers are included