New answers tagged

1

If your Exchange server is honoring SPF records for other domains but not yours, then you probably have your internal DNS set to be authoritative for your domain name, but you don't have the SPF record in your internal DNS servers. Solution: Add your SPF record to your internal DNS servers.


0

0) create an SPF record that contains your servers and the FQDN of the domain thet you want to protect. For example: richter.hu v=spf1 ip4:82.131.210.2 ip4:195.228.143.98 -all 1) wait dns ttl time to spf record spread on the internet dns servers. You can check it with mxtoolbox.com (change to spf record). 2) install transport agent get-transport agent &...


1

Assuming that you have set up SPF, DKIM, rDNS and that you are not blacklisted, your only options is Microsoft Smart Network Data Services. No kidding. That is official MS's program for registering responsible person (administrator) for IP address on which mail server runs. That way you can observe and review status of IP address of your mail server. MS ...


1

Doing an ARIN lookup of your IP, it looks like it's coming from a provider that offers cloud hosting services. It seems pretty standard for Cloud hosting providers to get blacklisted simply because of how often IP addresses can change hands and how easy it is for instances to send Spam. Mail services end up black listing the entire hosting provider's block....


1

The headers you posted don't really look like Hotmail Headers. Can you log into hotmail online not through thunderbird and grab the headers from the actual email. They normally contain all the codes to tell you why it's going to spam. I did check your IP at Symantec and it was clean (sometimes that's the culprit for Hotmail issues). You also might have a ...


0

@Mkgl - In technical terms, it depends. If bob@example.com is sending mail from the example.com (IP Address). Then it will pass If bob@example.com is sending mail from a different IP, then it won't even use the Example SPF to validate against (since it's not the sending IP). Remember the SPF is the 5321.FROM which is the "Return-Path" not the "From" on ...


0

In short - you can't. Other server always know IP-address of the host connected to it. Then it perform domain lookup to know what is the hostname of that IP address. While A DNS records can be multiple, PTR record is single, and you can't spoof it for some specific server over the net. The only way to remove mentions of the via-server is to configure ...


1

Yes, it should work, because you specifically list such server as allowed through the a: specification.


0

Yes it is. However, note that the mechanisms are evaluated in order[1]. Therefore, if _spf.example.net were to include Fail mechanisms, they'd trigger before a mx ip4:111.111.111.111. If that's not what you want, leave the includes at the end, just before the ~all. [1] http://www.openspf.org/SPF_Record_Syntax


2

You almost got it, but I believe the formatting has to be: v=spf1 a mx ip4:111.111.111.111 ip4:222.222.222.222 include:_spf.example.net ~all With the "a" and "mx" at the beginning. Edit: ~all is fine to use, but it's recommended to use -all for SPF to work more effectively.


1

Let's break this down a little farther. I can send emails from ceo@yourcompany.com, all that's going to happen based on your SPF setting is that it's going to either "Fail it", "Softfail It", or treat it as a "Neutral" email based on your SPF Setting of -all,~all, ?all. I still sent the email as ceo@yourcompany.com, it might land in the inbox, it might land ...


3

There is no way to specify an individual email address with either DKIM or SPF. Recommended solutions: For low volumes have them connect to your mail server on the Submission port (587) and authenticate before sending. This is likely suitable for your situation. For larger volumes (marketing mail, mailing lists), create a dedicated sub-domain. Configure ...


0

Can you provide spf record that you've set and header of email that was rejected. Reason for rejection is spf settings so you either didn't include sending server to your spf record or record itself is not valid.


1

You said that you're not sending from same server where you receive your mail. If you have another server that you're using for sending (different ip from you A record), you need to add that ip in your spf record: "v=spf1 a mx ip4:xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx ip4:yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy ip6:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx::xxx ~all" You should get either bounce message sent to your ...


1

Most people use MX or A in their SPF record that covers all of your MX Records and A Records v=spf1 mx a -all If you're not sending from your MX records then you can list out the ip4 addresses you send from. The best way to create your SPF Record, if you're not sure is to use an SPF Wizard You'll go through the questionnaire and it will produce the ...


1

If you just have those two IP-addresses sending mail for the mydomain.com domain, your SPF record should look like this: v=spf1 ip4:1.1.1.1 ip4:2.2.2.2 -all Do not use +all in a SPF record, since that allow the whole internet to send mail from your domain. In the final SPF record you should use -all to indicate that ONLY the listed entries are allowed to ...


0

The mail seems to be sent by mandrillapp.com for info@textthebutler.be. And it seems that the mail server for textthebutler.be, forwards the mail to peter@nowhow.be without changing the envelope sender. And since the mail server for textthebutler.be (tesla.mdware.org) isn't listed in the SPF record for mandrillapp.com, you get the softfail, since Google ...


3

SPF checks occur early on in the conversation so the sender (probably) doesn't get a chance to send the email before the attempt is rejected. So no, they're not recoverable.


0

I did finally get this response from Google. I was glad to find someone who understood the issue, but unfortunately it looks like Google is sticking with their incorrect treatment of the DMARC directive. Google Groups will only rewrite the From: header when the DMARC policy of the original sender (you in this case) is set to reject or quarantine. ...


0

Maybe the reason softfail is still used is that many users (rightly or wrongly) setup forwarding, maybe from their work email to home, this would get rejected if hardfail is enabled


1

Instead of (or in addition to) SRS_EXCLUDE_DOMAINS you can dynamically exclude domains if you go this way: sender_canonical_maps = mysql:/etc/postfix/no-srs.cf,tcp:127.0.0.1:10001 recipient_canonical_maps = mysql:/etc/postfix/no-srs.cf, tcp:127.0.0.1:10002 I found this very useful information with more details and examples here: https://github.com/...


0

This was answered some time ago, but I think the accepted answer lacks the point of why both must be used together to be effective. SPF checks the IP of the last SMTP server hop against an authorized list. DKIM validates the mail was initially sent by a given domain, and warrantees its integrity. Valid DKIM signed messages can be used as spam or phishing ...



Top 50 recent answers are included