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All authorized mail servers should be listed in the SPF record. As you now have a new authorized mail server, it should be added. Some SPAM checks differentiate between listed (A, MX) and permitted (~all), and will not treat unlisted address as a pass. This penalizes senders who don't send via an approved server (often spambots). The ~all policy indicates ...


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The right format for SPF record would be: domain.com. IN TXT "v=spf1 mx a ip4:mail.domain.com ~all" or domain.com. IN TXT "v=spf1 mx a ip4:mail.domain.com a:anotherdomain.com ~all" There are some online SPF Record Generator out there that can help you with creating SPF Record.


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bot converting comment to CW.... You've got "mx" specified twice in both of them v=spf1 a mx ptr ip4:84.40.9.177 mx ip4:84.40.9.11 ~all v=spf1 a mx ptr ip4:84.40.9.177 mx ip4:84.40.9.11 include:improvedemployees.com ~all


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I went through and looked for obvious DNS issues and none were apparent. As far as I can tell it's an issue of IP reputation. There are really only two good solutions to this: Get added to mail server whitelists and/or warm up the address by putting legitimate traffic over it. Use a smarthost/relay like Mandrill or Sendgrid. They're dirt cheap and make ...


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The reason for the failure is: Authentication-Results: hotmail.com; spf=softfail (sender IP is 184.168.200.138) smtp.mailfrom=no-reply@studentclutter.com; dkim=none header.d=studentclutter.com; x-hmca=fail header.id=no-reply@studentclutter.com The IP address 184.168.200.138 does not appear in your SPF record as either a (23.229.191.2), ...


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Those DNS TXT records are so-called SPF records, SPF being an email sender verification protocol known as Sender Policy Framework. Each validation mechanism in SPF is (optionally) prefixed with one of the following qualifiers, indicating how a match on an inbound message should be treated: +: Pass -: Fail ~: SoftFail ?: Neutral The default qualifier is ...


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Yes! It's not necessary per se, but highly recommendable. It's not so much about overcoming the ability to send email, but about protecting domain reputation. With no SPF record in place, receiving parties have little information to go on when determining validity and authenticity of messages claiming to originate from your domain. By publishing a ...


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I'm not sure it's technically necessary (as in things might work even if you don't make changes), but the two areas I would be modifying to accomodate this request are SPF and DKIM records. Alternately, you could try requesting that the third party send from their domain but use a reply-to of your domain.


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First of all, if you can, use a mass mailing service. There are plenty of them out there with various features and prices. Most don't cost very much. They will deal with things like managing people unsubscribing from lists, ensuring you are compliant with various anti spam legislation around the world, getting their servers off of blacklists, and give you ...


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You can't configure the SPF header. The header you show is added by Google after looking up your SPF records. You can however, configure you server so it will show an SPF pass. I have written an article on Securing your Email Reputation with SPF. Once you get all this working look at DKIM and DMARC. I see a few problems. It appears you have IPv6 ...


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You don't touch postfix; from an SPF point of view, that would only be relevant to incoming mail. For outgoing mail, set the DNS record correctly - you may find this question and answer to be of use - and let others worry about the headers.



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