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I'm not sure what answer you'd like. Neutral is rejected because that's what the daemon says it's going to do, if you invoke that configuration option. It notes, as you've highlighted, that this is not RFC-compliant. But here's the rub: you are not obligated to accept any particular email at your server. There is no Central Internet Court where, beneath ...


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It appears that Google simply displays the domain found in the Return-Path and uses that. This DirectAdmin help page explained that Exim, by default, sets the return path to user@server.hostname.com when the mail is sent form a script. The solution is to change exim.conf to include the following snippet: untrusted_set_sender = * no_local_from_check ...


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Since you're emails are being delivered to multiple Email Providers, each one of those providers process SPF Differently. Some ESP will evaluate the entire SPF, if any part of the SPF record does not conform to standards it will just fail the entire thing. Some ESP will evaluate the SPF in order and as soon as a MATCH is found, it short circuits the SPF. ...


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If your Exchange server is honoring SPF records for other domains but not yours, then you probably have your internal DNS set to be authoritative for your domain name, but you don't have the SPF record in your internal DNS servers. Solution: Add your SPF record to your internal DNS servers.


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0) create an SPF record that contains your servers and the FQDN of the domain thet you want to protect. For example: richter.hu v=spf1 ip4:82.131.210.2 ip4:195.228.143.98 -all 1) wait dns ttl time to spf record spread on the internet dns servers. You can check it with mxtoolbox.com (change to spf record). 2) install transport agent get-transport agent &...


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Assuming that you have set up SPF, DKIM, rDNS and that you are not blacklisted, your only options is Microsoft Smart Network Data Services. No kidding. That is official MS's program for registering responsible person (administrator) for IP address on which mail server runs. That way you can observe and review status of IP address of your mail server. MS ...


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Doing an ARIN lookup of your IP, it looks like it's coming from a provider that offers cloud hosting services. It seems pretty standard for Cloud hosting providers to get blacklisted simply because of how often IP addresses can change hands and how easy it is for instances to send Spam. Mail services end up black listing the entire hosting provider's block....


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The headers you posted don't really look like Hotmail Headers. Can you log into hotmail online not through thunderbird and grab the headers from the actual email. They normally contain all the codes to tell you why it's going to spam. I did check your IP at Symantec and it was clean (sometimes that's the culprit for Hotmail issues). You also might have a ...


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@Mkgl - In technical terms, it depends. If bob@example.com is sending mail from the example.com (IP Address). Then it will pass If bob@example.com is sending mail from a different IP, then it won't even use the Example SPF to validate against (since it's not the sending IP). Remember the SPF is the 5321.FROM which is the "Return-Path" not the "From" on ...


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In short - you can't. Other server always know IP-address of the host connected to it. Then it perform domain lookup to know what is the hostname of that IP address. While A DNS records can be multiple, PTR record is single, and you can't spoof it for some specific server over the net. The only way to remove mentions of the via-server is to configure ...


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Yes, it should work, because you specifically list such server as allowed through the a: specification.



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