Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

29

If this is something you see yourself doing often, automate it. And since you're both developers, writing some code should be in your wheelhouse. :) Seriously though... by automating it, you can do things like: Verify that you're restoring on the correct server (i.e. no dev -> prod restores) Verify that it's the right "type" of database (in your case, ...


25

I disagree with the assumption in the question —this is security— but I also disagree that automation is going to save the day on its own. I'll start with the problem: You shouldn't be able to accidentally do anything to production! That includes doing automated things accidentally. You're confusing system security with concepts like "who's allowed to do ...


12

One of my coworkers has an interesting approach to this. His terminal color scheme for production is fugly. Gray and pink and hard to read, which is theoretically supposed to ensure that whatever he writes, he really intended to write. Your mileage may vary... and I probably don't have to say that it's hardly bulletproof on its own. :)


9

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. First, some required reading: Microsoft Azure Trust Center HIPAA Business Associate Agreement (BAA) HIPAA and the HITECH Act are United States laws that apply to healthcare entities with access to patient information (called Protected Health Information, or PHI). In many circumstances, for a covered healthcare ...


4

Answering your comment: If you install SQL Server on D: and Windows runs on C:, SQL data will live in: the MDF and LDF files (on D:), in TempDB (on D:), and in Memory. It's possible in a severe low memory state for the data to get swapped to the page file, which may live on C:. Locking pages in memory may help. SQL 2014 should support this. See ...


3

Yes. Both products are part of Microsoft's standard SQL platform. Simply backup your database on the SQL Express platform and restore the backup on the SQL Standard platform. It really is that simple. About the only possible issue I can think of that will make it more than a few mouse-clicks or a couple lines of T-SQL is that you will need to specify new ...


2

Always on would let you have separate storage for each node. (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff877884(v=sql.110).aspx) However this gets trickier in win10 with the new storage HA features.


2

People often have a misconception about the full backup and log backups. In order for the backup to work in FULL backup recovery model, the t-logs must be used, as during the backups there may still be transactions going on in the database (unless you perform a so called COLD backup when you shut down the database). Oracle uses the same concept when you have ...


2

You installed the EPEL repository for EL6, but you are running EL7. Remove it and try again with the correct EPEL version.


2

You said in a comment above that your databases are only about 10GB total. SQL Server can easily load them entirely in memory, including data, indexes, and temporary data from your queries. This is a good thing, and provides better performance than reading from disk.


2

It means that your queries aren't large enough to fill the memory. This is a good thing, unless you are seeing heavy I/O while running the report.


1

You can copy a SQL user login password (hashed) from one instance of SQL Server to another. The stored procedure sp_help_revlogin is a Microsoft stored procedure created for sql server migrations. If you run it, it will give you a list of all the logins on a specific server (These are server logins, not the same as database users) with their hashed ...


1

Developers shouldn't know the password to the production database. The prod password should be random and not memorable — something like the result of keyboard mashing (Z^kC83N*(#$Hx). Your dev password can be $YourDog'sName or correct horse battery staple or whatever. Sure, you could find out what the password is, especially if you're a small team, by ...


1

I wouldn't actually execute this myself. ;) However. Declare @procid int, @SQL nvarchar(max) SET @procid=60 WHILE @procid < 100 BEGIN set @SQL='kill ' + CONVERT(nvarchar,@procid) EXEC SP_EXECUTESQL @SQL SET @procid=@procid+1 END As for processes from a specific hostname or username: DECLARE @Table TABLE( SPID INT, ...


1

Hyper-V on 2012 and 2012 R2 has built-in replication of virtual machines. Just enable it and replicate the VM's.


1

It's using SQL Agent Job step tokens (explained here) to set the path to one thing for default instances and another thing for named instances. Then it's using the SQLSERVER provider to get a reference to a (policy?) object for the instance and call a method on it.


1

It's not asking you to restore master. It's asking you to not be in DBASE while you're trying to restore DBASE. Try: USE MASTER GO ALTER DATABASE DBASE SET SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE GO RESTORE DATABASE DBASE FROM DISK = 'C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10_50.DBASE\MSSQL\Restore\DBASE.BAK' WITH MOVE 'DBASE' TO 'C:\Program ...


1

A step by step instruction can be found here: http://www.randomtechtips.com/change-logon-account-for-sql-server-service/ 1 – Create a dedicate domain account to be used for the SQL Server Service – don’t get into the habit of using your own domain admin account to run services – systems will break when you leave and your reputation will be shot! 2 – Using ...


1

This is taken straight from the manual, please consider it as a requirement: You cannot run SQL Server services on a domain controller under a local service account or a network service account.


1

I used the workaround posted on that Connect page by "Kyle Neier". That worked for me. Simply replace the PowerShell code in Step 3 of the SQL Agent Job with this: $SQLServerConnection = New-Object System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection $SQLServerConnection.ConnectionString = "Data Source=$(ESCAPE_NONE(SRVR));Initial Catalog=master;Integrated ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible