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A Virtual Directory Server would solve your problem. Definition of Virtual Directory Server from wikipedia: A virtual directory or virtual directory server in this context is a software layer that delivers a single access point for identity management applications and service platforms. A virtual directory operates as a high-performance, lightweight ...


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To my knowledge there is no easy way to create a single centralized alias for a SQL server instance. You can create aliases in the SQL client, but these have to be created on every client machine, so that's not much help. I'm also not sure if your alias can even be formatted as a named instance in that scenario. Actually, you can make an alias appear as a ...


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Well. You care because if you have your recovery model set to full and you don't back up the Transaction Log using SQL's backup (and not the server backup), the transaction log continues to grow until it consumes all available disk space. (I once saw a lesser colleague install SQL Server on the system drive and never back up the transaction log. It ate ...


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When we ran up to this issue, our resolution was to locate the folder and add the permissions needed for the virtual account needing this. Once we had added the account, simply by typing it in, we monitored the log files and found we no longer had the issue with respect to this folder/file.


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There are several reasons why you want to do that: A database system is usually busy, maybe doing thousands of transactions per second. The data could be spread out over several files on different filesystems. It is not trivial to make sure that the database is in a consistent (a.k.a usable) state after restoring. If your backup solution is up to the task, ...


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We manage several ERP systems as well. And the problem is often that at night there are often long running batch jobs which sync data with other systems. And they take sometimes an hour or more. So what you want to do in case of a crash is to jump to a point where you have consistent data. (Which means right between two batch jobs.) If you only look at the ...


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you only have to do this if your DB Recovery Mode is set to "full". If it is set to "simple" you don't have to make a Backup of the transaction Log. But watch out for the difference between these two options! First of all: If you want to be able to restore the DB to a special point of time you have to use the "full"-mode. (I think you can adjust the timing ...


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I'll bet any amount of money that one of the problem described in your second paragraph is your disk IO. Check your Disk Queue length in Perfmon on the actual hardware server. If you're using a RAID controller without an enabled write cache (Usually via a BBWC or FBWC, battery or flash-backed write cache), you're doing RDP wrong. Why do you also have MS SQL ...


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You have to wait sync job to be done.Check it by View Snapshot Agent Status. It automaticaly started after you created replication


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You need to encapsulate your column names with square brackets, otherwise SQL Server will interpret the spaces and dashes as part of the statement instead of the column name. SET @sSQL = 'UPDATE #tempProcsAndJobs SET [' + @columnName + '] = 1 WHERE createStatement LIKE ''%' + @columnName + '%'''; EXECUTE (@sSQL); This will result in the following ...


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Powershell to the rescue: import-module sqlps -disablenamechecking $s = new-object microsoft.sqlserver.management.smo.server '.' $a = $s.jobserver $a.Jobs['your_job'].script()


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Here's a start, without the error handling that SSMS adds when scripting the job. It pulls info from the relevant tables in MSDB that are used to run sp_add_job and sp_add_jobstep You could also create a stored procedure out of this with a @JobName parameter and pass it in the name of the job you want to script out. USE msdb /* Replace this with the name ...


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This is most likely a timeout due to some network issue. What the cause of the network issue is impossible to state given the information. It could be anything in between the client and the SQL Server instance. Client or server resource issues, problematic IP settings, errors with a NIC, network congestion or latency, etc. I know the errors are not ...


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Here's the link to the overall instructions. https://github.com/opserver/Opserver#monitoring-configuration Note these points: The basic configuration implementation is via .json files, for which .json.example files are included in the /config directory of the Opserver project. These .example files are exactly what’s running in the Stack Exchange ...


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When I add -d SHOWALL to my check command, so it's like: check_command check_nt!SERVICESTATE!-d SHOWALL -l MSSQL\\$$instance then nagios (in check_mk) shows: No service/process specified Do you know what can cause this problem? Solution Finally I've found the soultion. It turns out the problem was in check_nt command definition. Oryginally I've used ...


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I had to trial and error this one. What works for me is MSSQL\\$Instance as in check_command check_nt!SERVICESTATE!-d SHOWALL -l MSSQL\\$Instance


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Beside being cheaper Unless you have very specific use cases I doubt it's cheaper (or faster) to use Azure's SQL database service. You are comparing a FREE license of SQL Server to what amounts to a slice of an expensive, data redundant, enterprise license of SQL Server. I am in a similar boat (using both SQLExpress and MySQL for various small ...


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Timed out. Never got an answer that worked, but this was way too long ago to find one now. Thanks for everyone who tried to help.


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The syntax you're looking for on the ALTER TRIGGER command is: ALTER TRIGGER ON tableName WITH EXECUTE AS 'loginName'


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The short answer is: maybe. If you created the key with the KEY_SOURCE argument when you created the key and you have the value that you specified at creation time, then you'd just issue the same create symmetric key statement again in RDS and you should have the same key as in your source. If you didn't do that, then no. It doesn't appear that there is ...


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The "most secure" one will be the DBMS that you and your staff know how to properly operate, maintain, and secure. So, it depends on your skillset.


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What Squillman said, but also, you might want to consider using something like Ola Hallengren's scripts, which only do as much work as necessary. You can customize the amount of fragmentation in an index before it's rebuilt or reorganized, and this cuts down on the amount of work involved in reindexing. But yes. It depends on your environment, on the ...


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There are volumes and volumes of information out there that answer these questions. The answer is: it depends. Regular index maintenance and statistics updates are crucial, that much is certain. You have to do some research and tailoring of how and when to do it based on your environment, though. As a good start, read these: Rebuild or Reorganize: SQL ...


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You should instead use a version of SQL Server that is still supported. Also, SQL Server 2005 is not supported on Windows Server 2012. Sorry. If, for whatever reason, you have to have 2005, you'll need Windows server 2008 or 2008 R2. You'll have to copy the installer onto the Amazon EC2 instance and install it over remote desktop.


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Followed by: @SeanGallardy I checked the logs and it turned out that NetFramework 3.5 was missing and that stopped the process of installation go to further. NetFramework 3.5 is not enabled by default on Windows 8 and above.


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What will happen to the log file once this limit is reached? You are in trouble. Transactions fail., That isa 1gb rollback on likely a system not prepared to handle the load - will take literally ages of your assumed time. Is there any impact of setting a smaller max limit (say 100 MB rather than 1024 MB)? You run out of space earlier. WHich emans ...


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If your log file reaches its limit in size during a transaction and cannot autogrow then the transaction won't be able to commit and you will see errors in SQL. The log file needs to be sufficiently sized to handle the transactions in between CHECKPOINT operations. Setting a lower limit increases the likelihood that you will run into trouble due to a large ...


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Thank you every one for responding and helping me on this. It turns out be a log file corruption. Below steps solved my issue Stop mirroring Switching the database to the Simple recovery model Performing a checkpoint (which should clear the active log as long as nothing else requires the log to be kept active) Switching back to the Full recovery model ...


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It will continue running, as its already authenticated. Are you asking because you need to restart an AD server, or has your one and only AD server failed?


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If you have only C:\Windows in your path then that's an issue. Something is setting your path incorrectly or that machine needs to be rebuilt. That's most likely your issue with sqlcmd also. Try it on another Win7 machine and see if it works.


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Yes, both will have a potential impact on your performance. How much is impossible to tell without monitoring your server. Compression is CPU and RAM intensive, they are right about that. And you are right; network throughput is not the only factor to take into consideration when copying files. How your server is affected depends on how they are copying ...


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To view SQL statements that were executed you can do a trace. This link explains what you need to do to do a trace in AWS RDS. From the documentation: Generating a Trace SQL Query declare @rc int declare @TraceID int declare @maxfilesize bigint set @maxfilesize = 5 exec @rc = sp_trace_create @TraceID output, 0, N'D:\rdsdbdata\rdstest', @maxfilesize, ...


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In addition, here's a query that will get you the information FLAdmin refers to: USE master SELECT sys.databases.name, create_date, sys.syslogins.name FROM sys.databases INNER JOIN sys.syslogins ON sys.databases.owner_sid = sys.syslogins.sid ORDER BY sys.databases.name Regarding owner vs. creator, I would argue that the owner is probably ...


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In Management Studio just right click on the Database and go to Properties. On the general tab it tells you when it was created. Most likely the owner is who created it but that can be changed. Though not usually.


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This is my temporary answer: DECLARE @ProcessId int=null; SELECT top 1 @ProcessId=p.spid --, s.host_name, s.program_name, s.original_login_name, q.text as sql, wp.spid as waiting_sess, ws.host_name as waiting_host_name, ws.program_name as waiting_program_name, wr.wait_time as waiting_time, wq.text as waiting_sql FROM sys.sysprocesses p join ...


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You might be interested in this other StackOverflow thread: Limit resources available to query in SQL Server http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9336194/limit-resources-available-to-query-in-sql-server


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There is an option called 'query governor cost limit' which takes an integer value. The value you specify is what the max time in seconds that a query can run. Please note that this is based off of the estimated time and value. If a cost exceeds this, the query will NOT be allowed to execute. This is not an exact science, some may run longer and some that ...



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