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There are many types of acl. src means the client IP and not the interface IP (local address). I use localip acl type for that purpose: acl from_eth0 localip A.B.C.D acl from_eth1 localip E.F.G.H tcp_outgoing_address A.B.C.D from_eth0 tcp_outgoing_address E.F.G.H from_eth1 tcp_outgoing_address 1.2.3.4 # default ACL types are described in doc page. ...


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If the Squid is listening on port, let's say 3128, you can list all connected IP addresses to this port by using command like netstat in the server. For example: netstat -na | grep :3128 will display something like below: tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:3128 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN tcp 1 0 10.12.0.1:3128 ...


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Change the permission to squid analyzer location to chmod 644 -R /location-squid-analyzer Also check the cache.log chmod 644 and no need of cache to change make sure you given cache effective users in squid.conf with user you trying to access log files.


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There are different ways of achieving this. You may add firewall rules using iptables in the proxy server that will block outgoing connection to port 80/443 for local LAN, so that the users won't be able to use internet without using the proxy. Disable IP forwarding in the proxy server and configure proper route to the other network using route command so ...


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I solved this problem with cache_peer_access instead of cache_peer_domain. Create a regex file $ vi /my-no-proxy.txt Write regex in /my-no-proxy.txt ^.*my-site-dont-access-with-proxy\.com$ .*you-can-write-any-regex-here.* Change squid.conf vi /etc/squid/squid.conf Add below to squid.conf cache_peer my-proxy.com parent 8080 0 no-query ...


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squid is shipped with a set of configs: a minimal one, and a thoroughly documented one. you really should do your homework.


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If I may suggest a sneaky way of getting configs, search ServerFault for keywords like "squid config" or anything in that regards. You might like this seafood Hope this helps :p


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Clear and neat way to detect which site the user was visiting is to look at the Host header of the HTTP request. If the user enters the address into the address bar and the user's browser opens a dozen of various URLs, it means that user is visiting all of these sites. The difference between "a user is visiting a site" and "a browser is visiting a site" is ...


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Yes, it is, just setup your /etc/network/interfaces correctly.


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You can use the "userlist = userlist" (/ var / squidGuard / userlist) instead of "user = foo bar"


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I'm using squid for like 15 years. In fact, I'm writing this message through it. I tested the URL you provided, and it works okay. Few things I can tell about your installation, but still: you squid installation is like a thousand years old. Upgrade to 3.5.x at least, ASAP. from your access log I can tell that you are using a proxy chain, because of the ...


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From my research, it doesn't look like this is a simple config file problem. Squid has to be compiled using a --enable-ssl flag, and this appears to be fairly difficult with Debian based distros. It looks to me like squid is more ideal for RPM based distros. See here for more info. I'm going to mark this as an answer for now, unless someone posts ...



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