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It may sound confusing, but the ssl-bump option is available with http_port and not https_port. So change the line accordingly and restart squid and see. For http_port directive options: http://www.squid-cache.org/Doc/config/http_port/ For the https_port directive, there is no such option as ssl-bump. See here: http://www.squid-cache.org/Doc/config/...


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If you add the following line to your config file, it will stop IPv6 which slowed down my squid connections. tcp_outgoing_address 0.0.0.0 all


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As the other posters pointed out, nginx is a reverse proxy. This means it looks like a web server, and sits in front of other web servers that you would host. This isn't suitable for forward proxying (users on your LAN going out to the Internet). If you're not satisfied with squid and you're open to a Windows platform, you could try an alternative, such ...


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I suspect they want to get at the X-Forwarded-For original IP of the requestor for the logs. I know I am. ELBs don't forward these headers when using TCP in the ELB, but if you set to HTTP/3128 then it does. But now squid doesn't work. $ curl -v -x http://MYELB.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com:3128 -L http://httpbin.org/ip * Hostname was NOT found in DNS ...


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Make sure the client is pointing to squid (port 3128) and not to apache (probably port 80)


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Because with that logic servers can say to not cache everything. Yes, that's the point. Origins and user agents know a lot more about the cacheability of resources, and the desirability of servicing a request from the cache, so they get a set of knobs to twiddle to control caching. You don't want to override that in your cache, because it breaks all ...


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Yes, that was pointing to 80 port, which is apache. 3128 port in browser solved the problem.


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The best possible solution is to create a acl for each interface, make all the requests coming to that interface belong to that group and redirect that group to a specific outgoing interface. Example: The server X has the following IPs: 10.0.0.1 10.0.0.2 10.0.0.3 Therefore, the squid.conf file should be something like: acl 10_0_0_1 localip 10.0.0.1 ...


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CONNECT is only used by HTTP clients to an HTTP proxy to establish a tunnel through the proxy. There's no scheme in HTTP for an encrypted connection to an HTTP proxy either. I suspect an HTTP proxy is not what you're looking for here. I don't know if Squid supports TCP plugs with TLS and client certificates but WinGate does. Disclaimer: I work for Qbik ...


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Maybe your admin dislikes NGINX Plusbecause it isn't open source and would accept another well maintained open source product. Then ask him to look at stunnel. It is designed for exactly your needs. Quoting an stunnel example at wikipedia (for SMTP, but this would fit alos for your needs): For example, one could use stunnel to provide a secure SSL ...



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