Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

Note: This answer is specific to the server components described in the OP's comment. Compatibility is going to dictate everything here. Dell PERC array controllers are LSI devices. So anything that works on an LSI controller should be okay. Your ability to monitor the health of your RAID array is paramount. Since this is Dell, ensure you have the ...


8

Yes, the SSDs will be way faster than the SAS drives. For sequential throughput, a good RAID of SAS drives might do pretty well, but for random access, the SSDs will blow them out of the water which can result in a very noticeable performance difference. Depending on the particular SAS drives and the particular SSD drives, the SSDs may have a better ...


7

Consumer grade SSDs will work fine in many servers for use cases. They are way, way faster then SAS disks. I'd suggest the reason to get enterprise disks over consumer disks is not the speed, its the read-write cycles and better engineering - for example supercaps are present in some enterprise SSD's where the consumer grade version does not have this - ...


6

If you are using them for writes, to avoid data corruption in the event of power failure you need to make sure that you only consider models with a supercap. Eg. Intel S3500, Samsung 845DC Pro Otherwise consumer SSDs are more suited to caching.


5

The performance inconsistency of consumer SSDs can cause problems with some raid controllers, the spikes in I/O latency are exacerbated when using a raid controller as it often will not be using TRIM (I don't know of any controller that does). Enterprise drives are designed around consistent performance even without TRIM so they typically play well with RAID ...


5

The reason to go with enterprise grade gear is reliability more than speed. Most consumer SSDs are MLC, with the lower end stuff being TLC (MLC does 2 bits a cell, TLC does 3, and they're less performant, and reliable than SLC). At some point, they may also drop the onboard ram cache to save costs, as nand cells get cheaper. A enterprise SSD also has greater ...


4

Even consumer-grade SSDs are much faster than the faster 15k HDDs, so from a performance standpoint they will be fine (if using the right disk and if overprovisioning them), but you had to carefully pick them, especially due to how they interact with hardware-based RAID controller... First, check if affordable, entry-level enterprise grade drive (as Intel ...


2

They might have the same LUN ID (0) but they have different channel IDs (0 and 1), i.e. C00T00L00 and C00T01L00 This is perfectly acceptable, in fact even in say an FC/FCoE/iSCSI environment you can have the same LUN number so long as the full path is different.


2

Interesting question from a customer/end user perspective. My advice is not to use the HP DL380 G5 systems for anything today, if you can avoid it? They are unfavorable for power, performance, support and compatibility reasons. A few examples: RAM is very limited on this model. Any SATA SSD used on a Smart Array P400-era controller (2005-2008) will be ...


2

Put the host OS on a partition on the standard HD. Leave some space on the standard HD for VM overflow... even if you can fit all of the VMs on the SSD right now, you need to expect some growth. Then put as much of the VM's as you can on the SSD. This may mean using multiple VHD's per VM, to separate the VM OS from the application hosted on that OS. If you ...


2

You could use Storage Spaces to create two pools; one for SSD and one for HDD and allow SS to migrate the data around based on its IO requirements. I know for a fact this works great in a file-services system, I've not tried it with HV but there's no reason to assume it won't.


2

Your RAID6 description and translation to usage on a RAID1 is correct. It does not do extra writing as part of the RAID6 operation (in everything I've heard of) - everything needed would be done in the controller or software. In general I'd have to guess you'd be safe. SSD MTBF is pretty high. Check this out for fun - "The SSD Endurance Experiment: They're ...


1

While you could write a customer profile or modify one of the existing, I'd recommend tuned-adm profile enterprise-storage based on your hardware information. If you need more changes beyond that, just use "enterprise-storage" as a baseline.


1

Yes. You need a BBWC on any Smart Array controller in which you wish to use SSD drives. http://h20564.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=c02963968


1

From my experience, I would actually suggest an approach that may work out most ideally, but it will take some fine tuning. Place the O.S. on the SSD, on the "C:" partition. Also ensure that your virtual memory is set to this drive & partition as well. Leaving a descent chunk for Windows' updates & fragmentation breathing room, use the rest of the ...


1

Sure. Buy SSDs. High-end workstations typically have SSD options available and the barrier to entry is low if you want to purchase an aftermarket drive.


1

The benefit is huge if there is a lot of reading and writing while the number crunching is going on. On the other hand, if you pull everything into memory once at the beginning of the run, and then write it all out at the end, you won't see as big a boost. At the same time, if the OS or Matlab itself needs to page anything to disk, you will get a boost ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible