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5

Two main reasons: Resilience. Yes, they are fast. And they are self-repairing (to some extent). But they still can and will fail. And when they do, you'll be glad you used RAID (and backups, of course). Size. SSDs are generally quite small compared to HDDs, and anyway even with HDDs you still need to RAID several of them in order to build serious volumes. ...


3

Resilience - turns out you can't just put a one word answer. Edit - actually let's answer your misconceptions. No SSD's don't inherently address all things, they're quicker yes, that's it - we still need resilience. I've been using PCI-based storage for nearly a decade (FusionIO) but always in R1 as we need the resilience. Seek time isn't actually zero, ...


2

Take a look at: Consumer (or prosumer) SSD's vs. fast HDD in a server environment In short, treat these like normal disks. RAID them. Don't be concerned about why the SSD fails, but just that they may fail. Follow the RAID controller's recommendations.


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SAS versus SATA is going to be more important in enterprise use cases. Any high-availbility system is going to want dual-ported (SAS) drives, and that's a major differentiator. This is in addition to the presence of a super-capacitor.


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Since you are using SSD's performance should already be excellent. However you should be aware of the write penalty RAID5 incurs, but since you have specified a read heavy load then a 3 disk RAID5 will be faster on reads than a 2 disk RAID 1. I believe softRaid allows for a 3 disk mirror and I have never used softRaid so I am unable to comment on whether or ...


1

The big thing you should look for that makes a drive "Enterprise", regardless of how the drive is labeled and sold, is whether or not is has a supercapacitor to allow the drive to flush the write cache in case of sudden power loss. Most RAID controllers make certain assumptions that are still based in the old "spinning metal" era of hard drives. These ...


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The 840 EVOs have very significant problems with data retention Non-enterprise SSDs can be fine, but you need to carefully pick the right ones. My suggestions are about Micron M550/M600/MX200 or Intel 730 series.


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If you don't have a hardware RAID controller and are using software RAID, sure... It makes sense to check the S.M.A.R.T. status and monitor the RAID status of your array in that situation.


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I wouldn't eff with udev rules for this. Modify your install scripts (preseed or kickstart) to ignore /dev/sda. See: Consistent Install Disk Selection in RHEL Kickstart Also, is there any way you can run a network install. USB installation of the OS is fraught because of SCSI enumeration issues.



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