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1

The problem here is the write back feature of LSI controller, which only make sense for HDD´s. For SSD´s always use write through and no read ahead and DirectIO (even with RAID5). Then you see the expected performance with more SSD´s...


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select manage link speed from controller's context menu set it to auto or SAS-12


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Having a spare enterprise SSD on standby when using Raid 10 does not make financial sense. That is wasting serious money.


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Bottom Line - You get what you pay for. Without going into a rediculous amount of detail, because I'll let the internet do it for me. There is a huge difference between an Enterprise SSD like the Optimus or Sandisk Lightning or the Intel 3700 and the Samsung 840 or OCZ Vector. There's a pretty darn good review Tweak Town SSD Review. That review ...


3

I wouldn't use consumer SSD drives. While they will work, I think the better approach is to find a cost-effective SAS (not SATA) SSD. The Dell OEM drives are Sandisk Lightning (expensive, perform OK, last forever). A more affordable option is the Sandisk Optimus line (not expensive, perform great, endurance unknown)... See both at: ...


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I think the main problem is if you mix sata/sas on the same backplane on certain backplanes. The main advantage of expensive enterprise ssds is that they have a supercap to allow writes on power loss.


2

You can't just toss any old SSD into an HP ProLiant server... So your Intel SSDs likely are incompatible with the Smart Array P410 array controller in the system. You should provide any error messages as they appear during the controller initialization. Upgrading the controller firmware may help... however, beyond that, you don't have any other options. ...


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Which solution did you go with? Yes, SSDs are fast, and they give you real boost in performance if you use them for specific purpose e.g. host database server. I support a number of servers running with SSDs in Linux software RAID1. They all work OK except one. On that one server, RAID repeatedly reports disk failure for one of SSDs (randomly, not always ...


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The real answer is apparently the HDD enclosure is NOT UASP compatible. As such i have an NCQ capable HDD in a non-UASP enclosure which blocks the full force of USB3 in this set-up.


1

The answer depends on how the encryption is designed. Most block level encryptions have a 1:1 mapping between logical and physical sectors. That means reading one plaintext sector from the logical device translates to reading one ciphertext sector from the physical device. And writing one plaintext sector to the logical device translates to writing one ...


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in a word - YES (in 99% of uses) we have around 300 Intel 320 installed and after 18 months none failed this links may help: http://www.vojcik.net/samsung-ssd-840-endurance-destruct-test/ http://ssdendurancetest.com/



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