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How can I monitor SSD endurance? Install f.e. SMARTmontools, SMART is especially designed for monitoring hard drives, and these days it can monitor SSD parameter the manufactured decied aswell Search for write cycles, power on hours, power on count. Find out what flash chips you have in your SSD, find the specs for that chip, and get the average write ...


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TRIM works at the filesystem level so as you're giving your KVM domains a raw block device then you need to enable TRIM from within the domain; your host can't know the domains filesystem utilisation without examining it. To enable this you need to ensure there's a discard='unmap' attribute added to the disk definition in the XML for the domain, this is ...


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Here is the answer to the original question, asking for a Windows tool that will allow me view S.M.A.R.T. parameters on SSDs that sit behind an HP SmartArray P812 on a D2700 chassis: The short answer is that I can't find a tool that does this. The three most likely-to-work candidates were: SmartmonTools/smartctl - looks like querying S.M.A.R.T. behind an ...


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I recently built a pair of storage servers for my employer, using Dell C2100 chassis, running FreeBSD 10.1 with twelve 2TB 7200rpm Western Digital "SE" enterprise SATA drives. The drives are in a single ZFS pool consisting of two 6-drive RAIDZ-2 virtual devices (vdevs). Attached to the pool are a pair of Intel DC S3500 SSDs which are supercap protected ...


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I can speak on the specifics of what you're trying to accomplish. Honestly, I would not consider an entry-level HP P2000/MSA2000 for your purpose. These devices have many limitations and from a SAN feature-set perspective, are nothing more than a box of disks. No tiering, no intelligent caching, a maximum of 16 disks in a Virtual Disk group, low IOPS ...


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The rule of thumb I use for disk IO is: 75 IOPs per spindle for SATA. 150 IOPs per spindle for FC/SAS 1500 IOPs per spindle for SSD. As well as IOPs per array also consider IOPs per terabyte. It's not uncommon to end up with a very bad IOP per TB ratio if doing SATA + RAID6. This might not sound too much, but you will often end up with someone spotting ...


1

Please provide numbers detailing your expected and actual performance figures. Also, what is the SAS topology? How many SFF-8088 cables are in place between the host and the D2700 JBOD? As I mentioned earlier, the HP StorageWorks D2700 is S.M.A.R.T. aware and reports on SCSI Enclosure Services (SES) details... But your use case here is narrow. That's a ...


2

Your analysis is pretty correct. Use a few HDDs for lots of GBs, and lots of HDDs to a few IOps. Use a few SSDs for lots of IOPs, and lots of SSDs for a few GBs Which is more important for you? Space is the big cost-driver for SSD solutions, since the price-per-GB is much higher. If you're talking about a 200GB database needed 4K IOPs, a pair of SSDs will ...


2

Software RAID under Linux on modern hardware is fine... even with SSDs. It doesn't place a tremendous demand on your CPUs. Really. Heck, with premium Fusion-io solid-state drives, the recommended and common deployment scheme is to use software RAID. I wouldn't worry about this at all. Also see: Do I need to RAID Fusion-io cards?


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Your SSDs are likely healthy, but the HP Smart Array P410 RAID controller is not compatible with every SSD. In particular, some SSDs report incorrect temperatures attributes to the controller that cause chassis fan and system thermal issues. In addition, any SATA device used on that controller will be downclocked to 3Gbps speeds from 6Gbps. So you're ...


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My company has three datacenters. They bought drives from Newegg and stuck them in one of the Dell servers to see what would happen. It's been fine for two years. The only problem is that they can't reboot it remotely. If you reboot it it stays stuck on its POST screen until you clear the warnings complaining that it doesn't have real Dell drives in it.


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Buy the SSD drive that matches your expected workload. From the Dell SSD FAQ: The use of an endurance management algorithm ensures that sufficient Program/Erase (P/E) cycles are available for the warranty time period of the drive. The firmware will limit writes if a drive is written heavily. If you buy the a drive not intended for a write heavy ...


2

Depends on what you're doing to the SSDs. Today, MLC versus SLC doesn't matter as much as buying the appropriate drives with the right attributes for your use case and environment. If that means "write heavy", "read optimized", "low latency", whatever... See: Are SSD drives as reliable as mechanical drives (2013)? But why complicate your thinking? If a ...


1

Assuming you keep it under warranty, if it ever fails, they'll replace it. The expected lifespan is their problem.


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Bad news about MTBF is that common evaluation metodics suppose evenly distributed write load among all NAND cells. But cells are grouped into the clusters and when one single cell fails - whole cluster is marked as dead and is replaced with new one from the reserve. Usually reserve is about 20% of the SSD volume. When reserve is exhausted whole SSD will be ...


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OEMs test some drives (or change the firmware slightly and get them rebranded as theres) with there servers, and that can give you piece of mind. I typically use regular drives in my servers, and have come across a couple of issues - Using drives > 2tb in an HP system didn't work, and using regular consumer grade drives in an Intel server was ...


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I'll play devil's advocate here. If you are considering name-brand ENTERPRISE GRADE drives, with appropriate specifications, then in general they will be fine in commodity x64 servers. If you are considering CONSUMER GRADE drives, you are taking your chances. Other posters and commenters have explained the difference in quality and performance ...


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In addition to the other valid remarks: That particular drive, the Samsung 845DC is in the words of the manufacturer "designed for read intensive, <10% write content" and a write lifetime of 600TB which, depending on the IO profile of your VM's, may result in an early death, not covered by the 5 year warranty. Server SSD's are typically specified for ...


6

This all depends. If HP or IBM, I'd say use their respective drives. (just because) If Dell, probably use their drives... If you can't afford the Dell-spec'd disks, look harder. But refurbished Dell disks if you have to in order to save money and retain support. But also know that Dell PERC RAID controllers are manufactured by LSI, and LSI controllers ...


4

The manufacturers have spent time validating OEM drives and possibly creating custom firmware to deal with compatibility/optimisation issues with specifically their RAID controllers. There is some value but it is very untangible. Some products simply won't accept non-proprietary drives. Also until very recently server grade SSD products simply were not ...


1

I don't know any good tools, directly from the server. Instead, I'd recommend answering their question with a question- if you're doing IO to SSD, which has no moving parts and thus does sequential IO at the same speed as random IO, why do they care? Are they trying to size new storage for you that would be partly on regular disk?


0

You can use it without much problems in soft RAID1 configuration (even if the SSD was not so much overprovisioned), but only provided you TRIM on it after creating. You can do it by on of the following: using new enough kernel which supports MD passing TRIM to SSD (at least 3.8.something IIRC, but please check), and running fstrim(8) (from util-linux ...


2

16 disks (especially SSDs) in RAID5 is a bad idea... The HP P420i Smart Array controller would have warned you about this when you created the Logical Drive. There's some finesse needed to tuning the server you're describing. Can you provide specifics on the SSDs you're using, the current controller settings, the host's firmware levels and your testing ...


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You can't use non-HP SSDs in HP ProLiant servers like this. Just because this worked on your G7 server doesn't mean it is okay for your Gen8 ProLiant servers. (basically, why buy enterprise gear, then cripple it with incompatible components?) Please see: 3rd party SSD drives in HP Proliant server - monitoring drive health or Third-party SSD solutions ...


1

This is a tricky thing to do. Basically, you can install windows from HDD, but it should be dedicated for the installer (marked as bootable just as you would do it with USB drive installation) In your specific case (you have Windows 8.1 and without USB no real option to reformat drive), maybe you will try to install win2012 server over network with PXE if ...


2

Windows software RAID only supports Trim/Unmap pass-through for RAID-0 at this time. However, Sandforce (and most other SSD chips) will pickup that a block is being zeroed and mark the block for garbage collection instead (what Trim would do). You can force Windows to zero unused disk space with the cypher /w X:\ command. This does not work on encrypted ...


0

See Is TRIM possible on SSD disks in RAID 1? What you are asking for does not make sense. TRIM is an ongoing process not a once off pruning and it can't work in conjunction with RAID. But the drives will still do their own background garbage collection so it is something you simply do not need to worry about.



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