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5

You can if you really want, but I wouldn't bother regenerating 2048-bit DH parameters for OpenSSH. There are much more important things you need to do to secure SSH, like disabling weak crypto. What I would do is delete the existing ones which are less than 2048 bits. awk '$5 >= 2000' /etc/ssh/moduli > /etc/ssh/moduli.strong && \ mv ...


5

There are three common factors that affect a transfer speed: Bandwidth - An obvious factor that's apparently not your trouble. Network delay/latency - The SFTP is packet oriented-protocol. When downloading, the SFTP client sends a "read" request to the SFTP server, waits for a response, appends returned data to a local file; and repeats, until the end of ...


2

Set PermitEmptyPasswords yes in /etc/ssh/sshd_config, and then make sure the user account has no password.


2

I have struggle one this one as well for some time. Firstly check the version of openssh is >6.2 then the syntax of the sshpublickey from gosa. I had it on Debian 7.7 then dist upgrade to Debian 8 to get the latest openSSH features. Do ldapsearch -x '(&(objectClass=posixAccount)(uid='<Your user>'))' sshPublickey If you have added it with ...


2

For me it was an issue with my user account not being the owner of the file sudo chown myuser ~/.ssh/config


1

Here's the "correct" (syntactic) way to execute something like this in bash: ssh user@server "$( cat <<'EOT' echo "Variables like '${HOSTNAME}' and commands like $( uname -a )" echo "will be interpolated on the server, thanks to the single quotes" echo "around 'EOT' above. EOT )" ssh user@server "$( cat <<EOT echo "If you want '${HOSTNAME}' and ...


1

Since you primarily seem to be focused on having an encrypted telnet session, my suggestion for a alternative would be to use a tool like stunnel. Stunnel is a TLS proxy that allows you to add TLS/SSL on top of simple tcp protocols (like telnet). You get all the benefits of encryption, and authentication provided by certificates. The challenge with ...


1

The Rescue option will probably drop you into a root shell, or possibly a live CD environment such as Knoppix. From there you can edit any configuration files you need.



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