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Do not attempt to do this with .profile because it provides no security whatsoever and restricts exactly nothing! It doesn't matter what you put in .profile, since you can bypass it by simply giving a command to run on the ssh command line, like this: ssh user@host command. You can still get normal shell access by doing ssh -t user@host bash. Disabling the ...


3

To execute a script on a server using ssh is simple, something like: cat script.sh | ssh someserver However, you probably do not want to execute the same script on every server. You will need another script to read your users.txt and from that file create script files for each line in users.txt before calling ssh with a newly created script as input. You ...


3

There is no provision in the SSH protocol for redirects. Read RFC 4251, RFC 4252, and RFC 4253 for details of the connection negotiation.


1

Let's suppose your AWS is reachable via SSH at IP "your.ec2.ip.address". Let's suppose your office network has Internet access via a router that apply some NAT translations and, as such, your office PCs are seen, on the Internet, with IP "your.office.external.ip". Let's also suppose that you are located OUTSIDE of your office, with your laptop connected ...


1

When your instance is first created, it will not have any SSH keys in it by default, so you have to transfer them there, e.g., by using gcloud to connect to it the first time as described in this SO answer or by manually creating SSH keys and manually adding them to your instance as described in another SO answer.


1

While the docs for rsync say it accepts a host:path argument and uses rsh, I couldn't find evidence in the code for that support. Before issuing the message you're seeing, it does a bunch of tests on the source argument: To paraphrase: if ( is_real_local_abs_path($src) ) elsif ( is_ssh_path($src) ) elsif ( is_anon_rsync_path($src) ) elsif ( ...



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