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7

It has nothing to do with SSL. Why you should get the warning from scp is a different matter. Assuming the hostname is exactly the same as when you SSHed, perhaps you are using scp as a different user or from a different host (or using sudo, which means you will be using root's known_hosts file). To verify the fingerprint, you can use ssh-keygen -l -f ...


3

It's by design. When you accept a SSH fingerprint, you're basically associating that fingerprint with the hostname, whether example.com, www.example.com or 123.123.123.12. So the next time, once it's been added to your known_hosts, you know you are safely doing what you have said you are, eg ssh user@example.com. Suppose example.com changes A record, ...


2

Is there a NAT router between the two machines? It may be closing the connection do to inactivity and timeouts? The SSH client can turn on SSH-level KeepAlive to try to avoid this scenario. For openssh client, we include the following in the client-side config file (either /etc/ssh/ssh_config or ~/.ssh/config): KeepAlive yes


2

Use /bin/su rather than sudo. That uses root's password.


2

You can limit logins via PAM settings: http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/howto-deny-allow-linux-user-group-login.html


2

The database is locked While it's described in the question as "all other network traffic on the remote server seems to be interrupted" it is much more likely that the database dump locks (all) innodb tables. In this scenario any process reading/writing to locked tables will wait for the dump to finish, before it can then obtain a lock itself, read/write ...


1

Firstly, I would recommend against root login over SSH, it's a known user account and makes brute forcing password a bit easier. Again, this really isn't recommended. Instead create a user and use public key authentication instead of password authentication. And then the actual answer, you have following set in the configuration: PermitRootLogin ...


1

The feature you have to use is called NAT. As was stated before, depends on your needs. If you need a different external IP for each VM then go with pool, if not - use NAT and 1 external IP.



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