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0

You seem to be under the assumption that git-daemon is responsible. Have you confirmed that git-daemon is, in fact, running on the system? Check the process list as well as the open ports list: $ ps auxwww | grep git-daemon $ sudo netstat -ptuna | grep 9814 If git-daemon is not running and there's nothing listening on port 9814, it's possible that ...


1

Port 9814 is where git-daemon runs (e.g clone, git clone git://git.example.com/repo). This is meant for an internal git repository. Read the documentation for more details. You have 2 other options for setting up a remote git server: SSH server: git clone ssh://git.example.com/git/repo HTTP server git clone https://git.example.com/git/repo SSH is a lot ...


0

Ok i've found what the issue was - turns out the user's .ssh directory was owned by root rather than the user itself. It seems that this doesn't trigger an "Authentication refused: bad ownership or modes for directory" error in the logs, which I find a little strange.


0

To check if a service is running, use /sbin/service $ sudo service sshd status openssh-daemon (pid 6258) is running... $ sudo service sshd stop Stopping sshd: [ OK ] $ sudo service sshd status openssh-daemon is stopped $ sudo service sshd start Starting sshd: [ OK ] ...


0

To see more output (info) you could tail the syslog directly when you restart the ssh service like this: sudo service ssh restart; tail -f /var/log/syslog If the ssh service is not OK then you'll see something like this with exit codes, status etc: Jun 2 10:57:03 xfce systemd[1]: ssh.service: main process exited, code=exited, status=255/n/a Jun 2 ...


0

Yes, it means the service should be OK. Do you have a reason to suspect it's not OK?


0

Most likely you have a wrong configuration of the IP Addresses, you might double check that especially if these are not DHCP assigned.


0

Check if you don't have some process (possibly a duplicate execution?) already listening to that specific port on the respective server.


0

You would need to define $PATH in your ~/.bashrc file on target server, at the beginning of the file : export PATH=$PATH:/home/user/bin http://stackoverflow.com/questions/940533/how-do-i-set-path-such-that-ssh-userhost-command-works : Bash in non-interactive mode reads the file ~/.bashrc


1

First of all, your permissions on the .ssh directory should be: drwx------ On key files should be: -rw------- After you managed this, on server in your .ssh/authorized_keys append your public key used for authentication. Also, names should be id_dsa* or id_rsa* for default ssh to work. If you have other names, use this: ssh -i /path/to/mykey


0

You may be using the public key (instead of the private key) to connect. Make sure that id_rsa does indeed contain your private key.


1

Yes there is. Protocol Specifies the protocol versions sshd(8) supports. The possible values are ‘1’ and ‘2’. Multiple versions must be comma-separated. The default is ‘2’. Note that the order of the protocol list does not indicate preference, because the client selects among multiple protocol versions offered by the server. Specifying “2,1” is ...


2

As @MadHatter commented, it is important to allow DNS for established connections: iptables -I INPUT -p udp --sport 53 -m state --state ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT ip6tables -I INPUT -p udp --sport 53 -m state --state ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT


0

In your logfile there are entries saying Failed password for root. These are not followed by a successful login as you would have expected in case they were due to a legitimate administrator mistyping the password. This could very well be a password brute force attempt. And those send a lot more than just two requests. So it seems likely to me that if you ...


-3

218.65.30.107 is trying to hack you. They are from China.


1

What you're referring is "SSH REMOTE FORWARDING", and is properly explained in the "man ssh", regarding the "-R" option. > man ssh [...] -R [bind_address:]port:host:hostport Specifies that the given port on the remote (server) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the local side. This works by allocating a socket to listen ...


0

If you control the firewall you can use port-fowarding on it to avoid the use of a reverse-ssh (it will be more stable).


0

One really good reason to use authorized_keys2 is if you have a VPS with Arvixe where the tech support team continually overwrites your authorized_keys file.


0

Those symptoms are what you could expect to see in case of broken PMTU discovery. The client can connect and version information can be exchanged without problems because all the packets are small. But once the key exchange starts larger packets are sent. If larger packets are silently dropped by some intermediate router without sending the ICMP error ...


2

Here's the "correct" (syntactic) way to execute something like this in bash: ssh user@server "$( cat <<'EOT' echo "Variables like '${HOSTNAME}' and commands like $( uname -a )" echo "will be interpolated on the server, thanks to the single quotes" echo "around 'EOT' above. EOT )" ssh user@server "$( cat <<EOT echo "If you want '${HOSTNAME}' and ...


0

You can use the -m parameter this loads a file that will be executed on the server. The content of the file should contain the "ssh my_user@other_server" Alternative you can use a session and set it up so that under connection -> SSH you have "ssh my_user@other_server" this will load the session connect you to first then executes the ssh connection. An ...


0

Necromancing, but adding the following to your sshd_config should do the trick: Match User <username> PasswordAuthentication yes


-1

Create and save a session to connect 100.19.1.2 (specified as Host Name), with the following proxy settings in the config GUI: Proxy type: Local Proxy hostname: 100.19.1.3 Port: 22 Username: Maihabunash Password: secret123 local proxy command: plink -P %proxyport %user@%proxyhost -nc %host:%port Then run putty with the saved session name: putty.exe ...


2

For me it was an issue with my user account not being the owner of the file sudo chown myuser ~/.ssh/config


1

The Rescue option will probably drop you into a root shell, or possibly a live CD environment such as Knoppix. From there you can edit any configuration files you need.


2

I have struggle one this one as well for some time. Firstly check the version of openssh is >6.2 then the syntax of the sshpublickey from gosa. I had it on Debian 7.7 then dist upgrade to Debian 8 to get the latest openSSH features. Do ldapsearch -x '(&(objectClass=posixAccount)(uid='<Your user>'))' sshPublickey If you have added it with ...


1

Since you primarily seem to be focused on having an encrypted telnet session, my suggestion for a alternative would be to use a tool like stunnel. Stunnel is a TLS proxy that allows you to add TLS/SSL on top of simple tcp protocols (like telnet). You get all the benefits of encryption, and authentication provided by certificates. The challenge with ...


0

You can lock an authorized_key to the external sftp-server. command="/usr/libexec/openssh/sftp-server" ssh-rsa AAAA…== user@host.com When you do, your user can sftp, but cannot scp or ssh: $ sftp host:/etc/group /tmp Connecting to host... Fetching /etc/group to /tmp/group /etc/group 100% 870 0.9KB/s 00:00 ...


0

First: Thank you all for your help regarding this issue. Second: Due to circumstances, we were no longer able to wait and decided to reload a different back-up, which seemed to work. We were unable to determine what exactly caused the error due to the new back-up that worked didn't have any differences with the one that failed and we thus consider it to be ...


0

Reading the man-page of ssh-copy-id, it seems that it should copy all the keys from the ssh-agent that aren't accepted for login. So, load all the keypairs into ssh-agent using ssh-add and use ssh-copy-id after that. If that doesn't work, you can try specifying the keys for ssh-copy-id: for i in ~/.ssh/*.pub; do ssh-copy-id -i $i user@host done If that ...


-4

INTRO This way beats ssh copy id by miles as you can copy the keys to any user, for an ssh server with any port, not just 22. oh and u can have multiple keys in your authorized_keys.org that will get appended to the authorized_keys file on the server. Make sure authorized_keys.org has one ssh public key per line. There are many ways you can construct these ...


5

There are three common factors that affect a transfer speed: Bandwidth - An obvious factor that's apparently not your trouble. Network delay/latency - The SFTP is packet oriented-protocol. When downloading, the SFTP client sends a "read" request to the SFTP server, waits for a response, appends returned data to a local file; and repeats, until the end of ...


2

Set PermitEmptyPasswords yes in /etc/ssh/sshd_config, and then make sure the user account has no password.


5

You can if you really want, but I wouldn't bother regenerating 2048-bit DH parameters for OpenSSH. There are much more important things you need to do to secure SSH, like disabling weak crypto. What I would do is delete the existing ones which are less than 2048 bits. awk '$5 >= 2000' /etc/ssh/moduli > /etc/ssh/moduli.strong && \ mv ...


0

You can use the gcloud command to connect to your GCE VM instance via SSH: $ gcloud compute ssh INSTANCE_NAME On the first run, this will create private/public keys (will put them in ./ssh directory of your user). For the subsequent connections between your VM instances you can simply use the command below: $ ssh INSTANCE_NAME For more information about ...


0

As described in the answer to my similar question on SuperUser, you can use the "bang" syntax to exclude specific hosts from the original Host * stanza, like this: Host * !*.unfuddle.com ControlPath /ms/%r@%h:%p ControlMaster auto ControlPersist 4h In my situation, I found that the order of the Host sections when using a Host * seemed to be ...


0

If you're using public-key authentication, you can use this in your ~/.ssh/config: Host * PermitLocalCommand yes LocalCommand bash -c 'scp -P %p %d/.vimrc %u@%n: &>/dev/null &' I like it better than the script trick suggested above since it doesn't mess the invocation of the ssh command (when specifying extra parameters, etc.)


0

I had problem with sshd server rejecting agent forwarding request because of no space left in /tmp. This was because sshd needs to create socket in /tmp. Cleaning disk up resolved my issue. ssh -v said back then: debug1: Remote: Agent forwarding disabled: mkdtemp() failed: No space left on device


1

You can do it by mounting /home via NFS and setsebool use_nfs_home_dirs 1


0

In my case I'd set up a security group to allow port 22 connections from my IP only. Some days later my ISP has changed my IP address, hence the security group needs updating.


0

You are using the recent module to dynamically maintain a list of IP addresses for each connection attemp to port 22 and refuse IPs trying to connect more than 4 times in a minute or using changing TTLs (note: this last check could cause trouble to legitimate connections too in some cases). However, you are doing it wrong because you are not adding them ...


-1

You can bypass the with the -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no option. This is very useful when using ssh in a shell script. ssh -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no -o ConnectTimeout=10 -o PasswordAuthentication=no -o ConnectionAttempts=5 xxUser@xxxHost


0

I know this questions is really old, and has been answered, but since when I had this problem, this was the number one search result on google, I figured I'd put the information here. For some reason after I changed PasswordAuthentication yes to PasswordAuthentication no in my sshd_config file, it was still asking for the password. I had checked ...


-1

Could try doing an nmap of the server to see what ports are open on the network. You should see port 22 open.


0

I see apt-get is your package manager. If you are using Debian Sid or Testing, these break OpenVZ compatibility with their core packages (kernel, systemD stuff) almost constantly. After the third go around I just switched to Fedora.


0

Check if ssh service is running and is ssh port is listening netstat -ntap You should see one line with port 22 listening for process sshd: Active Internet connections (servers and established) Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address State PID/Program name tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:22 ...


0

You need a proxy in front of apache in order to discriminate SSH and HTTPS flux, which are conceptually totally different (SSH pops its banner and waits for answer, HTTPS listens for client initiative). sslh is what you are looking for. It binds on port 443 and redirect SSH traffic to localhost:22 and HTTPS traffic to localhost:443 (or whatever IP you ...


0

Putty allows you to configure HTTP Proxy: Perhaps you can try to also configure apache as a normal proxy onlly allowing to connect to you host on port 22.


1

check if the server is able to ping its default gateway check if the ping works to server from outside if ping works , then do a tcpdump on the interface to check if the NIC on the server is receiving any traffic try ssh from with in the server -- ssh localhost #if this does not work - sshd itself might be broken


2

SSH cannot be reverse proxied like that. Look at configuring a VPN server and gaining access to hosts on your internal network via the VPN. For example: OpenVPN is commonly used for this purpose.



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