Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

You are probably running rsync like this: rsync -a dir/ remote:/dir/ The -a option according to the documentation is equivalent to: -rlptgoD -a, --archive archive mode; equals -rlptgoD (no -H,-A,-X) You probably want to remove the -o and -g options: -o, --owner preserve owner (super-user only) -g, --group ...


18

I've found the answer myself. The problem was that I didn't use the option allow_other. sshfs -o allow_other -o kernel_cache -o auto_cache -o reconnect \ -o compression=no -o cache_timeout=600 -o ServerAliveInterval=15 \ xxx@yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy:/mnt/content /home/xxx/path_to/content To use this option you have to set the option user_allow_other in ...


14

This will vary depending on the OS of the server you are connecting to. For centOS 5 you would add to the sshfs mount options: -o sftp_server="/usr/bin/sudo /usr/libexec/openssh/sftp-server" For Ubuntu 9.10 (I think, might be 9.04, but it's probably the same for both) you would add: -o sftp_server="/usr/bin/sudo /usr/lib/openssh/sftp-server". To find ...


8

Currently, Upstart in Ubuntu does not generate network events. Instead it calls traditional sysvinit. By default NetworkManager is installed and running; rather than emit network events to upstart, it contains a run-parts dispatcher (/etc/NetworkManager/dispatcher.d/) which itself simply relies on ifupdown's run-parts dispatcher (/etc/network/*.d/). In ...


8

Don't pass -o or any of the other options that implies it.


8

Making an sshfs mount involves connecting across sftp. Hence, what you can do is look for the spawned sftp processes. Assuming the user andreas has made an sshfs mount, or logged in using regular sftp, you'll see something along the following lines: root@halleck:~# ps aux | grep -i sftp | grep -v grep andreas 11029 0.0 0.0 2420 648 ? Ss ...


7

You're getting about 80 Mb/s out of your 100 Mb/s link. That's pretty close to the theoretical limit of the link (you'll rarely get anything like the nominal link speed) and is an entirely reasonable figure to achieve. Beyond that, on top of the overheads of running an encrypted tunnel (SSH) you've also got the TCP overheads, and any other traffic using ...


6

The -r switch acts exactly how its name implies: recursively. It executes the same action on each and every file and directory inside the current directory, before removing it. So, yes, being quite slow for large (as in "with lots of different things inside") directories is absolutely normal. One of the biggest (and most feared) signs you mistyped a rm -rf ...


5

If you indeed use SSHFS to serve the content, this is an amazingly bad idea. Here is what happens: The file is downloaded from the remote storage to your local server. And then transmitted to the client. In effect, you will double the traffic four your system. This happens because the web server doesn't know that the file is on a remote server, he ...


5

This is by design in fuse as a security measure. Pass the -o allow_root or -o allow_other option when mounting the filesystem with sshfs. It is in place to prevent from root from being nosy on shared systems.


4

There are really no such thing as a special "SSHFS server". What SSHFS does it that it mounts a SFTP filesystem. In other words, what you are looking for is a SFTP capable SSH server for Windows. There are a bunch of SFTP capable SSH servers for Windows, but I don't have enough actual experience with any of them to actually make a recommendation on which to ...


4

Any good SSH server implementation should do the trick. I use Cygwin on many Windows machines particularly for its SSH+SFTP/SCP services (though I've never tried to connect to them using sshfs, it is a port of the same OpenSSH that most Linux distributions include so I expect it would work just as well). CopSSH is an option I've seen spoken of positively ...


4

You need to install: fuse-libs: e.g: yum install fuse-libs Check that you got the libs you need and that ldd finds your shared libs with: ldd `which sshfs`


4

Well, I have a friend who makes backup to my server using that very method. According to him it works well. Dealing with SSHFS and EncFS there are a few potential caveats to be aware of, such as uid mapping, workarounds for rename behaviors etc. Last year I did a writeup on how to use rdiff-backup across SSHFS and EncFS. Those pointers might very well also ...


4

Don't use the -a option, as it will include the -p option that keeps the permissions. For this situation, the -r should be enough. For more infos, see man rsync.


4

If you attempt to access an SSHFS filesystem where the underlying connection has gone away your requests will hang because the system cannot reach the remote machine to complete the request. If you are mounting the filesystem with -o reconnect (See the sshfs man page) the system should reconnect on its own. If it does not the only workaround I'm aware of ...


4

sshfs makes local mv calls for mv. I assume this is similar for cp. Not sure if this is the case if the remote sshd restricted to internal-sftp. edit: File flows through local machine for cp as well (confirmed with network traffic). $ sshfs -V SSHFS version 2.4 FUSE library version: 2.8.6 fusermount version: 2.8.6 using FUSE kernel interface ...


4

I have used FUSE with both sshfs and HDFS. sshfs seems to be very reliable, I've not seen a panic or hard crash at all. HDFS otoh has caused numerous crashes. This was investigated tuned, so long as we don't see heavy usage of hdfs everything is stable. I've seen sshfs's host systems disappear with no ill effects. HDFS caused all kinds of problems. This ...


3

The only way to do this is to have interactive access of some description on the remote server so the answer is no.


3

You probably want to add the _netdev option to delay mounting until the network has been enabled: sshfs#root@10.0.0.200:/home/ /home/ fuse transform_symlinks,allow_other,_netdev,nonempty,hard_remove 0 0 You can also put your script in /etc/network/if-up.d/ or the mount command in /etc/rc.local.


3

If it is not in the kernel (compiled in) and there is no loadable module available, then you are lost. The only way to get this done is use a kernel with built-in fuse support or build your own kernel. But if that is possible depends on the environment you have.


3

Alright, I'm going to take a stab at this, because I think my idea makes sense. You are dealing with multiple caches in this case, and that's what is tripping you up, I think. The first thing that rsync does is to determine which files it needs to transfer. It usually does this by spawning an instance of rsync at the remote side, reading the metadata for ...


3

I've been using encfs -> sshfs for some months now and have not had to restart it or kill any hung processes etc. However when I layered posixovl on top of those - so that all my local users could have proper ownership and file permissions on the remote file space (which was under a single account in a different username-space) - it hung within a day. When ...


3

A more stable setup would probably be to use EncFS with the --reverse flag. From man pages: --reverse Normally EncFS provides a plaintext view of data on demand. Normally it stores enciphered data and displays plaintext data. With --reverse it takes as source plaintext data and produces enciphered data on-demand. This can be useful for creating remote ...


3

Upstart is the preferred method of issuing startup scripts or services in Ubuntu now, although editing /etc/rc.local still works. Upstart allows you to control when the service is run, making sure it happens after initiating your network connection. It's also possible to edit the symlinks in /etc/rc.X.d directly, (substitute X for the run-level you are ...


3

The best solution would be ssh-agent as Zoredache suggests. Another is to put your key in ~/.ssh/id_rsa, that way it will be detected automatically. (Use id_dsa for DSA keys.) Yet another is ~/.ssh/config. Put something like this in it (see manual page of ssh_config for further details) Host somebox.somedomain.tld User joe IdentityFile ...


3

The best method would probably be, presuming the mount point is /mnt/sshfs, to run the following: umount -l /mnt/sshfs This is a "lazy" unmount, and can only be run as root. It will immediately umount the sshfs file system and let the kernel clean up the mess after. Be careful not to tab complete it as there's the risk you'll get a freeze if you hit ...


3

You need to enable the options allow_other and/or user_allow_other in /etc/fuse.conf. Otherwise only the user who mounted the filesystem can use it. Once you've made the change, unmount and remount the filesystem.


2

If you want to have a way to import your xva-backups into XenServer, you can simply install the xe guest utilities onto your backup server. They are included in the xentools iso (linux folder). then you can use " xe -s serverip -u root -pw password vm-import..." to import your backups (or even export them). Btw: Connection is secured via SSL.


2

No, working ssh access does not imply a working sshfs. This is because sshfs relies on SFTP in the background, which must be allowed by the server. The default configuration shipped with the OpenSSH Server allows it though (that's why it works at most places), but the local Administrator can of course choose to disable it. Furthermore, SFTP support and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible