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12

Yes, you will have to buy another certificate* The asterisk wildcard character * will only match 1 label in a resolved FQDN. This behavior reflects RFC 4592 Section 3.3, in its description of DNS label matching and fallback to the asterisk label. If you only need to secure a single endpoint under the .internal.mycompany.com. namespace, you don't need a ...


4

Er, that's the way it always works. If you are actually looking at a website via HTTP, you're very specifically not using HTTPS, and thus not using the certificate. You might be thinking of HTTP->HTTPS redirection; you can configure a webserver to redirect all HTTP requests automatically to HTTPS. Even though you type in HTTP, when the page finishes ...


3

PSK ciphers are not supported in the JSSE provider provided by Oracle (or any of the other JVM vendors as far as I am aware). You'll have to find a JSSE provider that supports PSK ciphers. That provider should include documentation on how to configure it. Note that while Oracle does list PSK ciphers in the Java standard names, that does not mean that they ...


3

It's very likely that your Apache server isn't handing out intermediate certificates that the Android devices need to verify the authenticity of your certificate. Client devices obtain the certificate from your web server at the time of access (generally speaking-- I'm steering clear of "certificate pinning" here because that's not happening with you). ...


3

A private key is in RSA format, not X509. Use "rsa" instead of "x509" in your openssl conversion command.


2

According to WildCard SSL Certificate security protocols it allows only protection of first level domain which also includes your main domain such as domainname.com and domain.domainname.com. It allows unlimited sub domains security but they must be first level domains. If you want to protect your sub domain name which formats in ...


2

Wildcard certificate for top-level domains aren't allowed by typical browsers for reasons that should be quite obvious if you think about it.


1

You do not use Active Directory certificate services to manage third-party certificates. AD CS is not an asset tracking or inventory system. (Your "assets" in this case being your collection of SSL certificates.) From an organizational standpoint, I would say that you need a CMDB/asset tracking system, with the ability to track SSL certificates as CIs ...


1

Should we install SSL certificates for GlassFish Server (maybe self signed certificates) to ensure SSL/TLS connection after passing the load balancer? If you have wildcard SSL certificate for *.example.com, then you can avoid self-signed certificate. You can give the glassfish hostname as subdomain of example.com (for example glassfish.example.com). ...


1

If the following command asks for the key then it is password protected. openssl rsa -in myfile-privkey.pem -noout


1

I've done this and it helped me on CentOS 5.7 server:~ # chcon -t cert_t /etc/pki/tls/private/my.key server:~ # ls -laZ /etc/pki/tls/private/


1

Yes, you can buy one certificate and use it on unlimited number of servers. However, some servers may require you to convert the certificate and the private key into an appropriate format. You may look into documentation to find the details for each program.


1

Check if 443 port is open to the world or not. Trying using telnet telnet <host> 443 See if that work ? If not. Check the security settings of the load balancer instance.



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