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You asked: "Is there some way to determine what exactly is being blocked?", and the answer is yes. Definitely, the most effective way to check what is going wrong within your browser is... to ask directly to the browser :-) Recent version of modern browsers (like Firefox and Chromium/Chrome) includes a "Developer tool" which, among lots of other things, ...


3

This warning will appear if any resources are being loaded over http (e.g. images, scripts, etc.). It will also appear if any forms are POSTing to insecure (http) destinations. However, if this warning is only appearing in Firefox I would first check to see if any plugins or extensions in Firefox are causing the problem. Disable all extensions and reload the ...


2

Sorry, this can't be done, and doesn't need to be done anyway. BEAST is no longer considered a serious threat, as client-side patches have been available for affected platforms for years now (even for XP!), and server-side mitigation requires RC4, which is now considered too weak to be secure and only makes things worse.


1

Ok, so here's what the problem ended up being. I assumed that if you enabled Full SSL (Strict) that CloudFlare would always connect to your website over HTTPS. Obviously that's not how it works. If you try to visit a site using HTTP CloudFlare will still connect to your server over HTTP. All I had to do was add a page rule on each domain to force the ...


1

The benefit of this is to know that if I choose to disable some specific cipher, which clients is it likely to affect, just like the SSL labs tests show for web clients. You don't need to restrict yourself to a specific cipher, but instead simply enable all ciphers which are acceptable to you and in the order you prefer them. The resulting cipher then ...


1

I have a very similar set up in HAProxy which works. I can only find two differences between your configuration and mine. In /etc/hosts I have bound example.com to 0.0.0.0 rather than 127.0.0.1. In my frontend, both bind entries contain a wildcard (*) in front of the colon. Example: bind *:80 bind *:443 ssl crt /etc/ssl/ssl.pem 2a. I actually used a pem ...


1

The previous answer is not 100% accurate. What back-end authentication ACTUALLY does is ensure that the public-key your backend server reports (when ELB is talking to your server over HTTPS/SSL) matches a public key you provide. This would prevent somebody from attaching a malicious server to your ELB, or mitigate somebody hijacking the traffic between ELB ...



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