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6

Your understanding is correct. When your company gets to the size that you need to bring in a dedicated Windows sysadmin they're going to be unhappy that you did this. I can't imagine that your logic is so complex that it couldn't be solved by the built-in functionality in Group Policy. Security Group filtering, WMI filtering (which is ...


3

The services on a CentOS operating system are managed using chkconfig. Use chkconfig --list to review the currently managed services. You can mark a service to automatically start at a defined runlevel by issuing: # chkconfig someservice on Read the chkconfig(8) manpage for the details.


3

You probably have a carriage return (^M) at the end of your #! line. The format of the #! line is very strict, and carriage return is not allowed there, unless your interpreter is actually called /bin/bash^M There will never be carriage returns in a file created with a proper unix editor, unless you go out of your way to add them. When editing an existing ...


3

As drive letters are ephemeral, it would be best to use UNC paths instead of drive letters. If the service is unable to handle UNC paths, consider creating a symlink to the destination like mklink c:\remotenetdir \\server\remote\netdir and use the local path (c:\remotenetdir) in the service configuration. Obviously, the service account would need to have ...


2

They are loaded based on hardware detection. In the case of your e1000e module the hardware in your machine, whether it is on board or a plugin card, will identify itself with a PCI vendor ID and device ID pair and those will be matched against the available modules and any module identifying itself with that ID will be loaded. You can see the IDs ...


2

Create a separate Systemd init script for the processes. For process A create the file /etc/systemd/system/A.service and add something like this to it: [Unit] Description=Process A After=network.target [Service] User=userA Type=forking ExecStart=/some/command/to/run --arg1 --arg2 Restart=on-failure StartLimitInterval=5min StartLimitBurst=4 [Install] ...


2

rc startup order is determined by rcorder, as you've already determined. This process for determining startup order is automatic, and the man page for rcorder is relatively self-explanatory, but you may will want to spend some time reviewing Practical rc.d scripting, and the rc man page before making any changes. In your particular case, you can tell ...


1

It depends on the init daemon you are using. For SysVInit you can assume something like the following to happen when you change the runlevel to 0: rl=0 for k in /etc/rc$rl.d/K*; do $k stop done for s in /etc/rc$rl.d/S*; do $s start done I can't see a contradiction of the sentence you cited to the things you said above.


1

Can you use the /etc/crontab and the @reboot time. The format of the /etc/crontab takes a username after the time specification and the process is run as that user. @reboot A /path/to/a @reboot B /path/tob and so on.



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