Hot answers tagged

8

Considering only the concepts involved at each layer of the stack and not the specific implementation, it could make sense for some applications to layer all of those three RAID modes. However the layout in the depicted diagram has a serious flaw. You have ordered the layers incorrectly. In order for optimal performance and reliability you have to swap the ...


4

I think this is pushing the boundaries of the RAID concept and you will run into trouble, will the PERC Controller allow you to add virtual disks to another Array? Won't each have its own write and cache policy, what is the cache size on your controller - anyway if performance is what you are after then have you looked at Ceph? -its certified to run on the ...


3

On the server I configured 3x 1Gbps NIC teaming with LACP. The same configuration and on the NAS device and the switch. NAS box has 4 x 2TB WD Red drive in RAID 10 field and 60GB SSD as a read cache. I set the iSCSI targets and set up all the instructions from the Internet. iSCSI and LACP don't mix well. ...


2

I wouldn't calculate it at all, because it's next to impossible to do that. The size of working set varies massively depending on workload, contention and scaling. You need to understand what's going to be going onto this array before you get even close - database workloads don't cache well as a rule (because databases already cache) where user 'junk pile' ...


2

What you want is to trace your system activity to see how much I/O requests can be satisfied by the fast SSD cache. In order to obtain a meaningful values, your should trace your system for a full work day, multiple times. To do that, you can use both Windows performance monitor (disk counters) and the more in-depth Xperftool. While Windows performance ...


2

Very odd question - seemingly you don't know vSphere terribly well. It already allows for much of what you want - you can attach a range of storage to your hosts and move VMs between them as needed already - though you can't use CIFS. VMWare won't in itself manage and data replication but you can use it's built in Replication service to replicate whole VMs ...


2

Connections for a SAS-based HP P2000 or MSA2000 SAN to the host should be standard SAS SFF-8088 male connectors on both ends. If your HBA has a SAS SFF-8470 port (CX-4 Infiniband type), it's probably not the best HBA for this purpose. However you can just use the proper cable. Cost doesn't matter. SAS is a standard, so get whatever meets your needs.


1

I think the architecture you have in mind is overly complex without any reason I could think of. Essentially you are wasting 28 disks out of you 48 disk array for redundancy. The reason RAID6 was invented because many consider RAID1/RAID10 be too wasteful but you go even further applying RAID10 on top of RAID6. I would recommend either using RAID10 ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible