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How would I mount the big xvda1 volume as the main one? Well, it looks like that's already the case. /dev/xvda1 is mounted as your root filesystem (assuming that by "main one" you mean "root filesystem"): $ df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/xvda1 32G 3.5G 27G 12% / You may just need to expand the filesystem on that ...


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SNMP is actually deprecated in Server 2012 - have a look at this. You can still install SNMP as a feaure though, so try doing as described on this page if you haven't done so already. Next step is to figure out if the traps you want are actually in the collection of things exposed by the Windows SNMP service. You do this via the traps tab on the SNMP ...


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No, this is not possible. Most hardware RAID controllers forbid the creation of arrays of mixed media; e.g. SATA and SAS together or SAS and SSD. The array would not accept an SSD replacement for a failed SAS/SATA mechanical drive.


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There are quite a few options with varying degrees of resilience, disk efficiency and ease of operation. Here are a few: RAID 0 & 1 RAID 0 and 1 are immediately out of the question, RAID 0 offers no redundancy (in fact it increases risk) and RAID 1 is limited - as you mentioned - to the maximum size of 1 disk. RAID 5 Is an option and you only lose 1 ...


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There are a couple of points I would like to stress: first, I would try to use a dedicated storage device if possible. Hardware built for an specific purpose tends to be more fit for it that generic servers. That being said, I understand that if the budget is low, there may not be a chance of getting a small disk array. Therefore, if you need to use a ...


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You've messed up... Sorry. I'd love to see the output of zpool history data. But my guess is that you wanted to add more disk space, but instead, you added a group of 6 disks in a RAIDZ2 and set it to stripe with your RAIDZ1 set. You should know that RAIDZ vdevs aren't expandable... the only way to "grow" the pool is by adding another vdev. You were trying ...


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There's no reason to have separate storage for each hypervisor. Storage is designed to simultaneously serve data to many different types of clients. You want to make sure it's properly sized to do the job, of course.


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This is normal behavior of XenServer. All the metadata for the image (VDI) is in the Xapi database files, not in the image files themselves. Note that the UUIDs of images are also gone, so no matter if you've imported diskless VMs back from old hosts or recreated them from scratch, there's no way to Xapi to find which VDI belongs to which VM. Same goes for ...


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This configuration has a lot of components and design decisions that contribute to its poor performance. The HP Microserver is low-performance item. RAM-constrained and low-end CPU. Western Digital Green drives are low-RPM and require special consideration for their 4k-sector formatting. This is likely the main problem. It seems like you may be using ...


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Mechanical HDDs struggle at random I/O access. 4x WD Green that give you 5 MB/s of random read performance is even better than I expected.Some math: at 5400 RPM, a single rotation need 11 ms, so an half-rotation need ~5.5ms. This is the rotational delay. Adding another ~8ms of seek time (the time the actuator needs to correctly position the read/write heads) ...


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I would use straight RAID 1+0 mirrors... e.g. 6 mirrored pairs striped together. Keep your spares handy and be sure to monitor the array. Nothing more to it.


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I would do this with standard vSwitches and possibly NIC primary and standby adapters. You don't need LACP for this. Create a dedicated vSwitch. Make one or both NICs active... And I think that's the most you can do with this setup, since your switches aren't stackable. Let me look into it, though.



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