Hot answers tagged

25

There's an interesting intersection of server design, disk technology and economics here: Also see: Why are Large Form Factor (LFF) disks still fairly prevelant? The move toward dense rackmount and small form-factor servers. E.g. you don't see many tower offerings anymore from the major manufacturers, whereas the denser product lines enjoy more frequent ...


5

There are at least a few things that could cause problems with SOME drive types: Drives that are not meant to deal with the vibration load of a chassis having many drives (unlikely problem with any drive specified as RAID/NAS-capable) Firmware that does not allow TLER, or needs time-consuming manual reconfiguration of the drive to enable it (ditto) Drives ...


4

HUGE issue: (May be a teeny bit off-topic - but I'ts imporant!) When you are dealing with SSDs - (as is often the case, or may be either the case or temptation) - a lot of SSDs have a nasty problem where they cannot always recover from spontaneous power outages! This is a tiny problem with HDDs. HDDs usually have enough capacitance to power their logic ...


4

I would work with a ZFS professional or vendor who specializes in ZFS-based solutions. You're talking about 100TB of data, and at that scale, there's too much opportunity to screw this up. ZFS is not an easy thing to get right; especially when you incorporate high-availability and design for resilience. I wouldn't plan on half-filling storage enclosures or ...


4

FC HBAs will auto-negotiate down 3 steps, so a 16Gb port can talk to another 16, an 8, or a 4. An 8Gb links can talk to another 8, a 4, or a 2. If you haven't changed anything on the switch, this should just work when you plug it in the first time. If it doesn't, you might need to log into the switch and fiddle with port settings. The Brocade command you'd ...


2

You would use the cheap HP SATA SSDs for boot. They're not fast. But they work just fine for the purpose. (It's clearly an Intel SATA drive) SATA is fine in this case because there's no need for dual-port SAS disks in an internal server backplane (no failover or multipath needs).


1

I am not sure I would use ZFS on Linux for such a setup, as ZoL remain a somewhat "moving target". Regarding your RAID card, if it can be configured in JBOD, there is no problem. However, if it only work in RAID mode, I would change it for a JBOD/HBA adapter. Anyway, as suggested by ewwhite, I would ask to a professional ZFS verdor/consultant.


1

I wrote an article at Thinkmate that tries to give a nice overview of NVMe and works as a nice little guide on choosing the right drive and system, something that I've found to be missing online. We mostly sell Supermicro servers, and I agree - Things can get a bit confusing... That is why I wrote the article! As for adoption, I can't speak for the industry ...


1

1.You should size your workset to match the expected cache hit ratio. This totally depends on the workloads you are expecting. When you want to get a nice high number make sure that the workset completely fits into the cache. If you want the number for the drive which is like if there was no cache at all use the maximum possible size for the workset. For ...


1

Two issues. Your HP MSA2324 is a SAN connected via SAS. Your ability/inability to access the MSA2324's controller via its web or SSH interface are a separate issue from the messages presumably showing up inside of the OS of your Linux-based system. They may be linked, but there's clearly a problem with your storage. So connect to your MSA using its serial ...


1

I'd really recommend period-correct HP JBOD enclosures and gear if you're doing this. The HP D2600, D2700, D3600 and D3700 are the right tools for this. For interfaces, you'll want an HP HBA in each server. The G6/G7 and Gen8 should use different HBAs. The cabling will be SFF-8088 for the D2x00 and SFF-8644 for the D3x00. There's a lot more to this... ...


1

I think #2 and #3 are pretty much the same thing, the main difference is that there is no stopped container with #3 (it is literally, just a named volume). For example, you can create a named volume and do similarly what you would do with #2 with -v instead. Create a named volume: $ docker volume create --name test Mount and write some data to that ...


1

You can try running: sudo apt-get autoremove This command removes packages that were installed by other packages and are no longer needed. I assume you have unused kernel images making boot partition full. And if you can't run the above command then you will need to clean /boot partition manually. First you can use the following command to find out ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible