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5

You are dealing with AFS, which is a networked file system. I suspect that you are probably bumping into a quota limit. You will need to work with the administrator of that service.


4

This is entirely dependent on the software you are using. Exchange, for example, does not support NAS protocols such as NFS or CIFS/SMB for its databases; only SAN and DAS solutions like iSCSI or Fibre Channel. There is also general confusion about what constitutes NAS and SAN. Many new products are what is called "unified storage"; a combination of NAS ...


3

A default Windows instance based on modern AMI images is 30 GB. This is smaller than the old default of 35 GB. Under the free-tier, you can get 30 GB of EBS volume space each month. But you can have more EBS volume space if you want; you'll just pay for any extra. Once the volume is full, the volume cannot be resized. However, there are 2 options that you ...


2

I tend to think that in general it is better to buy cheap stuff with lots of spares and just replace them when they break - I guess I don't understand that line of thinking. Should you be financially frugal? Yes. Should you be cheap? Probably not. I don't have any expertise on the specifics of consumer versus enterprise SSD drives so I can't speak to that ...


2

if you're running MS windows, 30GB is clearly not enough. Windows folder after updates goes to 25GB by itself. You should recreate your machine with a larger disk. For downloading, depending what you're using to download, you should probably be able to change the default destiation of download. But since you're C: is full, it's a useless system. You can ...


2

The block size should be 64kb for MSSql Server, for optimal performance, as described by an easy Google search. In regards to drives, RAID 10 requires an absolute minimum of 4 drives (look at the image you linked yourself) and then you can expand to your hearts content in pairs of 2 (again look at the image you linked). But remember that once the system is ...


1

Check your inode usage via df -i - on a standard partition, you could have exhausted your inode limits on the filesystem. This most often happens when you're storing lots of small files (for example, cache). Your df -h output suggests that you have zero bytes in use on that partition, so this could also be access or mount permissions on the underlying AFS ...


1

if you take here 2 and not 0 as in the example cb56f6f4 1,0,"/vol/vol_name/qtree_name/subdirectory",2,... then you can replace all permissions by only the new one. !Be carefully with it you will really remove all other permissions in all Subdirectorys! Normal you will need this option only if you have interrupted inheritance in subfolders.


1

The accepted answer works for vSphere 6 as well, and it works for both local and remote SSD drives either with JBOD or RAID configuration. The additional commands not mentioned in the answer are: # esxcli storage core claimrule load # esxcli storage core claimrule run # esxcli storage core claiming reclaim -d <naa.ID> Then you can test if you were ...


1

Bit late to the party here, but for what it's worth "attached" SSDs in Azure have their IOPs throttled based on the machine size. It wasn't mentioned in the pricing anywhere but I raised this issue as a ticket with technical support when they referred me to the blog post below. See this link: ...


1

Don't worry about the result not fitting for addition. Just ignore the overflow. There is no ambiguity. For example, let's imagine buckets that hold a single decimal digit. 5 + 4 + 8 + 3 + 6 => 26. Since it only holds one digit, we'll just write "6" for parity. Now we need to reconstruct the fourth data digit. The inverse for addition is subtraction: ...


1

Answering to your question about setting disks in fault state: the Storage Manager Client allows you to maually fail a disk. In the main menu, go to "Advanced" -> "Recovery" -> "Fail drive"



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