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This is how SAS expanders work. You're technically oversubscribed, but in reality, you shouldn't be. Your WD2003FYYS disks link at 3.0Gbps, but are only capable of 1.2Gbps/disk. Your Supermicro drive backplane/expander has 16 ports with 6.0Gbps downlinks to the drives, but a single SFF-8087 uplink to the controller. From what I can tell, this backplane ...


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You're looking for: clustered storage heads connected with a dual-path SAS topology. QuantaStor(Linux) and NexentaStor(Solaris) can do this. You can also roll-your-own with a clustering suite like RSF-1. But really, depending on the requirement, this just adds complexity with a tiny increase in availability. The likelihood of complete head node failure ...


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I think that the root of this question is that there are two fundamentally different methods of doing snapshots. A VMWare snapshot means that is halts writes to its primary disk and instead puts all writes into a separate snapshot disk. Reverting to this snapshot means discarding all the writes since it was taken (which causes very little overhead), ...


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Don't focus on snapshots. It's clouding your judgment :) VMware has templating and cloning functionality built into vCenter. You need a $600 vSphere Essentials license to enable this. You can create a VM to your taste, then clone it to a template. That template can then be used to generate new virtual machines. This allows you to have a "clean state" but ...


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A RAID 0 array would be stupid but would be closer to what you're looking for in that only a sixth of the data would be written to any one drive. That said you'd be buying 6 drives when you could just be buying 1 or 2 good quality drives which are these days much more capable of dealing with heavy writes, plus of course as previously stated RAID 0 is stupid ...


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First, the only indication of the RAID level used is in the header of your question; so I am assuming that you are using RAID 1 consistently for this discussion. Second, the short answer is no, it will not extend their life. The longer version of the answer is, RAID 1 is mirroring, which directly implies that all data written to one disk is mirrored to ...



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