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1

SSDs have a maximum MB/s as well as a maximum IO/s rating. Your storage will cap on either as you reach it. If that maximum MB/s is higher than a single FC link, you'll be capped by that link.


2

It sounds like you're running into IO contention. There are a couple ways of fixing it: Separating the workloads. Put the testing on one set of disks and the VMs on the other. That way one won't interfere with the other. Nuke the problem with SSD. Solid-state is much more I/O friendly. If you can afford the space you need, this will make sure your I/O ...


4

It's a balance between price and performance. Mechanical SATA drives obviously have better prices but are in no way designed for such jobs, so for a serious business it's a no-go SAS protocol has enhanced features (for example queue re-ordering) that allow them to better manage I/O from multiple VMs and so they are much-more efficient (even with the same ...


1

Although I didn't find a solution for deleting files directly by using the CLI, I discovered some old snapshots. I was able to delete those old snapshots by using the CLI and that gave me some free space again on the LUN. How to delete snapshots by using the CLI I could find here: ...


2

Your sources of latency are several: Drive storage-io stack latency on whatever is hosting the storage. This ranges from sub-millisecond to 10's of milliseconds, or even 100's of milliseconds for really loaded systems. Network-FS stack latency for whatever method you're serving this up (CIFS, NFS, OpenSwift, Gluster, whatever) For connection-oriented ...


0

Deleting files inside the server that uses the LUN will not necessarily free up space. VMWare leaves data from its deleted files all over the disk, dereferencing deleted files without actually removing or overwriting their data. If you're using a supported combination of VMWare and Netapp, you can use a special VAAI command to unreference scsi sectors that ...


0

This answer is just to be up-to-date. As of Gen8, you cannot put non-HP disk into a HP server, as the HDD trays became intelligent. The trays communicate with the server so the server can log what HDD (with what serial number) you put into the server. HP has some marketing jibjab about how this solution increases stability and whatnot, but this primarily ...


0

It looks like you're searching for "snapback": https://github.com/markround/XenServer-snapshot-backup . It's a shell script launched by cron on the cluster pool-master and, based on "custom fields" defined on VMs, decide what to backup (xva_backup defined), when to backup (xva_backup=daily|weekly) and how many backup to keep alive (xva_retain). Backups, as ...


0

This seems long - I have 12x 750GB on a 5805Z (BBU), RAID 6, home server. When I lost one drive, it took ~4 hours to rebuild. During that rebuild, another drive died (that's why I would NEVER use RAID 5 - disks always fail under heavy load - like a rebuild / OCE). That one also took about 4 hours. I replaced the 4 750's with 3TB drives, and created a 2nd ...


1

there could be size limitations for virtual disks based on your OS/partition table format This is correct. MBR partition tables have a maximum partition size of 2TB, so if you're using MBR (the windows default during partitioning from the GUI) then you'll need to use the "Convert to GPT Disk" option in disk management. @techieb0y's comment also touches ...


6

Each vendor has their own recommendations, so start by asking IBM. You can open a ticket asking for configuration advice without paying for additional support, usually. That or whoever sold it to you can. Briefly googling, I discovered this redbook. Page 212, you likely want basic raid 6, which means 1 spare and a drives per array goal of 12. That will mean ...


0

I would never go for a RAID6, or even 5 for that matter for database style work loads. Since they are parity based, they incur a high write penalty and the rebuild times can be HUGE. RAID 10 will give you the best performance, you can survive one failure from each side of the array and you can allocate a hot spare or two to make sure that the array gets its ...


3

Disclaimer - This is highly opinion-based, and have flagged the question as such, but I will attempt to offer an answer as I have quite recently configured almost the exact same setup. I highly doubt that any kind of database will perform well on a RAID5 or 6 array. Most vendors are actively discouraging (and even in come cases prohibiting) use of unnested ...


0

This is a bug in Windows 7 WMIC. When you use Dutch regional settings in an English Windows installation, WMIC searches for the xsl files inside C:\Windows\System32\wbem\nl-NL, instead of C:\Windows\System32\wbem\en-US where they are. Workarounds: Create a folder named C:\Windows\system32\wbem\nl-NL (or whichever locale you use, check HKCU\Control ...


0

Aligning the LV chunk sizes with the RAID per-disk stripe size might improve performance, as it reduces the need to touch multiple disks to get a single LV chunk. I'd be inclined to think that making the LV chunk size the array stripe size (ie 13x per-disk stripe size) wouldn't do anything for you. If you're doing a lot of linear reads, setting a large ...


0

My impression is that you're looking for a Union Filesystem where you have two (or more) disks, each with their own file-system: /hdd1 /hdd2 | | +-- /dir1 +-- /dir1 | | | | | +- file2 | +- file4 | | +- file2 +-- file1 | | +-- file5 +-- /dir2 | ...


0

So you want to automatically distribute data between physically different file systems without providing redundancy for the data? Linux does not have a built-in method for this. You can use MD or ZFS to set up RAID, but automatic distribution and tracking of files between different file systems does not exist. This would be an application level (i.e. ...


0

I'm not sure why you'd want this over traditional RAID. But perhaps something like the copies= directive in the ZFS filesystem could be useful to you.


1

do the Expander also have to be capable of 4kn drives or is it enough if the Host Controller is capable of 4kn drives? Just the controller is enough. Is it possible to use a 6Gb/s or a 12Gb/s SAS Controller with this expander or are there any limitations? Sure, why not.


1

You won't be able to get much in the way of performance or health information about an MSA storage array over SNMP... Use email alerts and just rely on those. OpenNMS will be useless here.


1

We are missing the "what happened before you asked this question?" information. The HP MSA2324sa is not a new product, so is this a used device? How did you get it? Where did you get it from? All you need to do is create your volumes on the MSA in the SMU. Then map those to the server over controller(s). What type of HBA(s) are you using? Did you reboot? ...



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