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2

On most of the networks I work with the router address is the first routable address (1, 129, and 193) in the subnet. This is by tradition, and not a requirement. Another option is to use the highest routeable address (126, 190, and 254) for the router. The lowest address in the each subnet (0, 128, and 192) is the network address and is not assigned. The ...


1

Those addresses are network addresses, which identify the specific network, and cannot be assigned to a host, which is what a router is. A router's interface must have a host address in order to identify that it is a member of that network and to know what interface to route traffic to.


7

I still don't understand why /22 instead of /23 Because you have calculated your subnets wrong, and you are trying to use IPs from two different subnets. Or to put it a different way, if you use a /23 bit mask your starting address for the range, must be the first address for that range. 192.168.1.1 is not a starting address for any network described ...


2

It is unclear to me why you tried to setup a sub-interface. I suspect you just need to add this as just another secondary. interface FastEthernet0/1 ip address 192.x.x.x 255.255.255.128 secondary


1

You haven't described the parameters of the exercise enough to make answering in a way that's acceptable to your instructor apparent. I'll take a stab for fun ('cuz, ya' know, I like answering questions for fun), though. Presumably, since you mentioned "domains", you have three DNS servers hosting Active Directory-integrated DNS zones. These three DNS ...


5

If your school is filtering incoming addresses at ingress then using RFC 1918 address-space as the sentinel for being "on the LAN" is probably fine. It seems a bit dodgy to me, frankly, using IP address as some kind of implicit authentication, but it'll work. If your school isn't filtering RFC 1918 address space at ingress then it's theoretically possible ...


1

No way will that work. There's an enormous likelihood that the users, when on a different private network, will find that they are using an RFC1918 range. The RFC does not say that they are reserved for private use by only your school. Essentially every organization that doesn't have public IPs to throw away (almost all of them) is using RFC1918 addresses ...


0

We went about setting up our MPLS in a different manner. Now when I run the netscan, it does indeed, give me a report of the MAC addresses of devices on the other subnet. In an MPLS, if properly configured, the two subnets should work together as if they were a single network - file-sharing works normally, computers can discover each other on the other ...



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