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0

Hi I had the same situation with my colo provider. My first subnet was a /28: 197.1.2.0/28 giving me 14 usable IP's, first is the gateway and last is broadcast IP. Then my new second subnet is a /26: 129.2.3.0/26 giving me 62 usable IP's. In PFSense I setup the WAN as normal for the first subnet then for the second i had to had a new gateway through "System ...


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Actually it's not colliding. One subnet has more specific mask 192.168.0.0/24 has more specific mask than 192.168.0.0/16 For example default gateway is default because it has less specific mask /0. If you add a route to 192.168.0.3/32 via another interface it would have more specific mask than other two routes.


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The use of multiple ips on a single network card can usually only work when they are a clustered resource with the failover cluster manager. In each nic you add a single network ip address with or without a gateway in the operating system. You can add a cluster resource of type ip address to setup a access point for the resource. I use this for things like a ...


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Try the following Require not ip 118.168 118.169 118.170 118.171


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If I were you, I would use routing protocols like eigrp or ospf. These protocols are flexible. or instead, you can use default route.


1

So each branch is connected to the main via a "serial link". I suppose what you mean is that at each branch there is a router with 10/100/1G/10G Base-T on one side, and a serial connection on the other, with the serial connection being to some kind of DSL or or other modem or MUX. Then over this serial connection, the router uses PPP to create an IP ...


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You could use the bash scripts located here for converting from cidr to mask and mask to cidr notation: Here's a copy of what the scripts are, to ensure the answer is always available here: mask2cdr () { # Assumes there's no "255." after a non-255 byte in the mask local x=${1##*255.} set -- 0^^^128^192^224^240^248^252^254^ $(( (${#1} - ${#x})*2 )) ...


9

kasperd posted a great answer detailed enough for me to learn how I can recover from situation in the question. This answer is the exact step-by-step of how I did it. SSH to server on same physical network Using arp -a or ip neighbor list as root find the MAC address of misconfigured server. Using MAC to link-local converter find link-local for ...


2

You need to load an IP address within the configured subnet of your target, not just within the range that you actually want. If you send a packet to 10.0.0.2 with subnet 255.255.255.248 from, for example, 10.0.0.220, 10.0.0.2 will look at its subnet mask to figure out how to reply. Since .220 is WAAY out of the subnet 255.255.255.248, .2 has to send the ...


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You need to be able to log in on another host on the same network segment. Some of the ways to get access to the misconfigured host requires root on the intermediate host, but there also is one easy way to get access without needing root on the intermediate host. The easy way to access the host using IPv6 ssh -o ProxyCommand='ssh -W ...


5

IPv6 usually uses a /64 per subnet. Routers send a Router Advertisement or RA to the LAN. This RA contains the basic settings for the LAN like which prefixes (often a single /64) to use, whether the router can be used as a default gateway, whether hosts are allowed to auto-configure themselves and whether there is a DHCPv6 server on the LAN (and what kind of ...


4

Each broadcast domain gets a /64. If you have your hosts isolated, so that there should only be one per subnet, you can assign a whole /64 for a single host. This is mostly used for servers, where you use static IP assignements anyway. If you see the need for SLAAC or stateful DHCPv6, you probably should assign a /64 for a whole network segment, not a single ...



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