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The L2 switch keeps the VLANs separate. To route between them, you will need a router.


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Seems to be a change in default behaviour: HP Q&A With routing enabled, any VLAN that has an IP address configured is a routed VLAN. If you do not wish to have traffic routed on a particular VLAN, do not configure an IP address on that VLAN. This is certainly how the current edge switches are set up here.


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Use SHIELDED ethernet cables labeled STP or even SSTP (foil and braid). UTP are for typical office applications (cheapest, so you end up seeing these routed through walls by inexperienced installers). There is also FTP. On a factory floor or harsh noise environments you need Shielded. I am not sure how but these switches and cables can also be grounded ...


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Regarding question 3: If you use an unmanaged switch you're likely to regret it if you need to add additional switches later. Unmanaged switches don't support STP (Spanning Tree Protocol) which is essential in any network that's comprised of more than one switch. Regarding the options you've listed: Option 1 seems to me to be the more efficient, cost ...


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You need to add IP routing for the other networks in the laptops. This is easiest if the 172.20.51.61 machine is also the default router in your network. In this case, you need the following things: Ensure that IP routing is enabled in the router machine. Add firewall rules so that traffic between the two VLAN networks is allowed. Ensure that the two ...


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I had something similar dealing with a client site with a DDWRT'd router a while back and found this: http://wiki.openwrt.org/doc/howto/clientmode#routed_client_mode From the above page: Masqueraded - "Using masquerading (NAT) on a client router connects a network segment behind the client to an existing wireless network without further modifications to ...


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Thanks @Yoonix. I wasn't expecting the CLI to be same just as I wasn't expecting command line for CentOS to be same like Ubuntu even though both are linux. I was asking for anyone who has done it to share the information if they have one. I found the answer to my question btw. Here is how they do it. conf t vlan 10 int vlan 10 name New Vlan end ...


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You have three separate issues here. First, assigning unique IP addresses to Computer 1 and Computer 2 in the LAN (the right side of your diagram). If the router implements a DHCP server, and the switch is just a transparent switch, then the different computers will be served different IP addresses. This is how routers usually work, so you should be fine. ...


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If your switch does offer DHCP, then it needs to be configured properly if you want it to give out leases for 192.168.0.0/24. The IP assigned to your switch can be without any relation to the DHCP range, which the switch might offer. However, in your setup it is more likely that the router is acting a as DHCP server and the switch will thus just do typical ...



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