New answers tagged

2

The following configuration works for me. The essential part is bond-xmit-hash-policy layer3+4 which controls the interface hashing policy for transmit packets. https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/networking/bonding.txt It is also the rough equivalent of that the switch does in regards to load balancing the packets. http://kb.juniper.net/InfoCenter/...


2

This is expected behavior when you have unmatched speed and are running mismatched speeds. If you are able to saturate the 1GB link, the other end will have read only 100 packets by the time you have sent the 1000 packets. It is unlikely your router will buffer the remaining 900 packets. UDP is an unreliable protocol. Unlike TCP it does not come with a ...


0

So it looks like this is working now, in the end the particular devices I was pinging didn't have the right default gateway and/or subnet mask setup by the equipment installers. I incorrectly assumed that if the switch could ping them then it was good enough and the device should be able to ping other subnets but it doesn't look like this is the case.


0

Yes, you could buy a Cisco core switch and have the HP switches terminate into without any issue. If you plug the compatible SFP+ modules in Cisco switch, and use the right SFP+transceivers on HPE switch, and then choose the right cable type, say multi-mode fiber, you can make it.


0

You can't do VSS with the 3850's. You could stackwise through the stacking ports but that would require them to be somewhat near eachother. You can setup HSRP/VRRP/GLBP with a virtual IP to provide next hop redundancy. however, you would not be able to form a functional etherchannel from one device to both switches.


0

First PC B must obtain PC A MAC address so it either ARPs or it has already received a gratuitous ARP. Either way it has the MAC address and yes it will send the ping to PC A. PC A receives it because it is directed at its MAC and IP addresses. PC A should now send the response to the gateway as you say. The frame will have PC B's IP address but the ...


0

The gateway sees that there's a packet's sender is in the same subnet as the receiver, so it discards the packet as there's no routing to be done. This likely depends on what kind of device your gateways is and how the gateway is configured. But, assuming your gateway device is using a /24 netmask, any router/switch/firewall will see the packet come in and ...


0

Why is PC B able to ping PC A? Because PC B can send packets to PC A without resorting to going outside it's local network due to the subnet mask it's using - by giving it a /24 you're saying that 192.168.1.1-255 addresses don't need to go to the gateway to access them.


0

Have you tried looking your user manuals, I think that might be able to help you. There you can get your answers in Appendix A. Here is the link for your manual. if it works say it in comment. https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwiI-s_lkaTNAhVLo48KHZlDC7gQFggbMAA&url=http%3A%2F%...


-2

It is not advisable for you to purchase the Cisco switch in your existing network. Because switches from Cisco and HP are designed to have their unique function even though they can both support 10G Ethernet.


1

Does this mean I could buy a Cisco core switch and have the HP switches terminate into without any sort of issues? I've never heard of any issues with this, certainly I'd suggest you use Cisco SFP+'s in Cisco devices and HPE SFP+'s for HPE devices but otherwise as long as you get the cabling right (try to stick to OM4 LC-LC 50/125u fibres) then you're ...


0

I assume we are talking about 802.11q. To create a trunk port you need to set that port to tagged. All other port in that Vlan are untagged. The switch will add a tag to all. You can have tag ports. Tag port mean the packets have already a VLAN-tag, i.e. they are tagged by the network device connected to this port.Your switch will not add or remove the ...


1

Layer 2 segmentation refers to VLANs, or Bridges that connect different Layer 2 (data link layer of the OSI reference model) segments. nTier references within Cisco speak - i.e. Core layer, Access layer, Distribution/Aggregation layer are informal and have no direct association to the OSI reference model at all.



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