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12

As others have said that looks like a loose-loose situation. (Starting at the end) Completely new deployment Of course you can't just take the servers down and let the installer do it's magic. General Process Get budget for a backup server (backup as in storage for the data) create snapshots of the data and place them there before doing anything Get ...


8

GT5 is probably what you're looking for.


6

I use ncdu for this. Console-based, so working anywhere, and very simple to use.


6

You can trace the execution of a series of scripts using bash -x bash -x /path/to/your/script From this you can figure out which scripts are being called. You can force the script to abort early using the -e switch bash -e -x /path/to/your/script which may save you having to wade through lots of output


6

Smartmontools are good tools for this. Install it with yum install smartmontools You can examine your drive with smartctl -t short /dev/sda More options you can find in man page.


5

PsTools in general, and PsExec in particular. PsExec will allow you to run arbitrary programs on the remote computer, including cmd.exe and even powershell.exe. Having a remote command-line login to a Windows machine is great. Also, winexe is a Unix utility that allows you the same access to a remote Windows machine. The great thing about these remote ...


5

My linux servers already email me a daily report. Look for a program called "logwatch".


5

Apple Remote Desktop. It's by far the most useful tool that's out there. You can do screen sharing, remote control, installing files and pkg remotely, doing hard- and software inventory and lot of other stuff. There are few tools that made my job so much more easier than this. If you have more than 3 macs in more than 2 rooms, get it. It's not very cheap ...


5

Screens tend to be a very personal thing - I don't think there's one universal set of "must-haves". That said, I'd recommend steering clear of the "glossy" displays and pay the extra few bucks for those with antiglare screens. Additionally, make sure that the monitors are VESA mount compatible so that you can attach them to a dual monitor arm if desired. ...


5

I'm not a monitor expert, but I'll offer you the qualities I like in monitors I have to stare at all day: Height adjustment. It's important that you not look down at your monitors all day. I can say from personal experience this leads to neck strain. My monitors are currently sitting on an empty 2U rail kit box to bring them up to the right height. ...


5

Nagios is a monitoring and alerting system, which has graphing capability (if you pay for it). Cacti is a graphing system, which does not have alerting capabilities (at least not years ago when I used it last, and there's no mention of it on the Cacti site). The two are related (and often paired to avoid paying for the commercial Nagios implementation), ...


4

This isn't much different from: http://serverfault.com/questions/3482/tools-a-windows-administrator-cannot-live-without http://serverfault.com/questions/20251/must-have-windows-systems-client-side-tools-and-settings http://serverfault.com/questions/7460/tools-to-keep-my-machine-spick-and-span-windows-xp ...


4

The CLI that comes with OS X Server is pretty powerful and can do everything and more than what's provided via user interface. There isn't a tremendous amount of information on the web for managing OSX compared to windows or linux, but I found this blog to be quite helpful and a good place to start: http://managingosx.wordpress.com. Otherwise, get MacPorts ...


4

First of all, if you're going to invest extra time in this I'd advise you to actually get paid for it. It seems you've accepted unpaid overtime as a fact, judging from your words - it shouldn't be that way, in my opinion, and specially not when you're in such a pinch because of someone else's fault (be it management, the old sysadmin or probably a ...


4

Do you have reason to believe that the previous admin left something bad behind, or do you just watch a lot of movies? I'm not asking to be facetious, I'm trying to get an idea what sort of threat you think is there and how probable it is. If you think the chances really are very high that some sort of seriously disruptive problem might really exist then ...


4

Midnight Commander (mc) is the usual answer, but there are others. I'd recommend you take a look at GNU Interactive Tools, or GNUit (it was git before Linus "reappropriated" the name...) Like other GNU tools, it has EMACS-like bindings throughout. GNUit is console-based and extensible, and has the dual-pane file manager layout with a command line ...


4

Most server-based hardware, or server motherboards now a days have some sort of on-board network based KVM systems that allows remote administration of a machine, most of the time it's called IPMI. It allows you, with the correct license, the ability to pull the console (screen) and send keyboard and mouse entries directly to the server, and also mount ...


4

Virtualization is a great way to give everyone their own "sandbox". LXC definitely is an option but you could also just use VMWare ESXi or Citrix XenServer. Both have commercial variations but they also have single-server free licenses. The reason using ESXi or XenServer might work better is the ease of being able to take snapshots or cloning systems. So ...


4

I'd recommend Trello for this, with all team members subscribed to the board. You can assign ownership of tasks, the updates are realtime, you can mention members (and get email updates) and there's a nice accounting/logging of task activity. Plus, this is a good visual representation of outstanding tasks. Plus, the checklists are invaluable.


3

Look at Apt-Proxy. apt-proxy is a program that caches the packages you download from the Internet, to your hard disk. Because apt-proxy behaves as if it were a HTTP server with a full copy of the repositories you select, you can access the packages from other computers on your network. If a package is not in the cache, apt-proxy automatically downloads ...


3

Cabling plant is usually the first thing I tackle. Here are some of my tips/tricks. Number and Label every rack. (Also have a designation for front and back.) Know the U spaces in your racks. U1==bottom -- make sure it's easy to identify that. (you may need to tell someone someday to reboot a server which may not be labeled.) I am a firm believer in ...


3

They are semi-developer-oriented, but the sysinternals tools are among the best and most useful tools available.


3

Open Active Directory Users and Computers, select the computers in question, right click, select manage, and remote their domain accounts from the Administrators group. Close, and have the users log out and log back in. Problem solved.


3

I've seen in Tekzilla a tool, named JDiskReport which runs on several OSes. Actually I haven't tried it out on any Linux yet but on Vista it is great. And it is a Java application therefore it should work on Linux too.


3

The Windows AIK is the officially supported way of doing this, and is available for the Windows 7 RC (discussion here: http://www.mydigitallife.info/2009/05/06/windows-automated-installation-kit-aik-for-windows-7-rc-official-download/ ) You should note though that it requires quite a bit more work that you may be happy with, but you can be certain that the ...


3

I used to use apt-cacher, but I've since replaced it with apt-cacher-ng. What you need to do is On the server, apt-get install apt-cacher-ng On the server and the clients echo 'Acquire::http { Proxy "http://server:3142"; };' > /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/99apt-cacher-ng, replacing server with the domain name or IP address of the machine running apt-cacher-ng ...


3

You can use the setx command to set the PATH that will be given to newly opened shells. Combine that with an autorun batch file and you should be in good shape. You will have to reverse the procedure before ejecting the drive though. As an alternative, have a cmdln.bat on the drive that opens a shell with environment configured how you would like it. That ...


3

Ummmm, how about top? The VIRT, RES, and SHR columns (which are present by default in every version of top I've used) list memory consumed (in kb), which is exactly what you're looking for.


3

Simple: Nagios was built with alerting first. Cacti was built with graphing first. Both have addons that will enable the functionality of the other, but it boils down to what you want. If you already have a monitoring solution, and just want performance graphs Cacti might make sense. If you want a single unified solution with an emphasis on monitoring, ...



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