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1

Found it. The version that is in centos 6 has a bug that was fixed 4 years ago but hasn't been backported by Redhat. https://www.fedorahosted.org/cronie/ticket/8 Going to build my own revision.


-2

Came here because one of our Customers Servers was upgraded from Debian Etch (4.0) to Jessie (8.1) last week and /var/log/syslog had no activity since then. It turns out that in Debian 7 sysklogd was replaced with rsyslog. Just installed rsyslog-Package as mentioned in http://jonsimpson.co.uk/log/2014/syslogd-updated-debian and syslog is up and running ...


1

Check the manual for your syslog version. Almost always you can forward the messages your systems generates via the syslog facility (which are normally written by syslog to local logfiles) to a remote syslog server, but not existing log files nor the files directly maintained by other services, that don't use a syslog facility. In the syslog configuration ...


1

It depends on the syslog on your server systems. In case of RSYSLOG you can just so set up your config like that: mail.* @@other-server.example.net:10514 Source: http://www.rsyslog.com/sending-messages-to-a-remote-syslog-server/ EDIT If you want to replicate mail.* log on the same server just add another line with the same condition: mail.* ...


1

can you run crond with -x for debugging and see if it helps? I've tried running the same job with same crond option and it works fine for me. I'm using Centos7. Also have you tried using "hello".


1

My two cents here: Notice that adding the port number (514) at the end of the drain URL is important. I initially though that the 'syslog://' prefix should suffice, but apparently it doesn't.


0

I tried adding syslog to the tty group: sudo adduser syslog tty and it seems to work after service rsyslog restart and re-logging in. And just for fun, the hard-to-read-but-more-generic version: adduser $(awk '/^\$PrivDropToUser/ {print $2}' /etc/rsyslog.conf) $(stat -c "%G" $(tty))


1

From where can I get the source code for syslog() This is provided by glibc or the libc implementations on other Unix flavors. This call basically submits your message to the syslog unix domain socket /dev/log. This socket is normally created by the system logger (e.g. rsyslog, syslog-ng, nxlog, etc).



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