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This seems to work consistently for "graceful shutdowns" (shutdown, reboot, systemctl) as well as "crashes" (power off, reset, echo c > /proc/sysrq-trigger): last -x | grep 'reboot\|shutdown' A reboot line followed by a shutdown line indicates a "graceful shutdown". Two reboot lines indicates a "crash".


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Funny, I just happened to reboot a CentOS 7 system last night, and so I have a nice log of just this to look at. In the case of a crash, obviously nothing is logged between the time of the crash and the system restart. In the case of a reboot, it is pretty obvious, as you get a log of (nearly) everything systemd is doing to shut down the system. One such ...


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I don't particularly like the answer, but it's an answer we got from RH. I'm posting it here in case it helps someone else. One possible way is to grep for rsyslogd in /var/log/messages. A graceful shutdown would have exiting on signal 15. A crash would not. tac /var/log/messages | grep 'rsyslogd.*start\|rsyslogd.*exit' Two consecutive start lines may ...


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Then you also have non-intrusive monitoring that helps you proactively exercise your applications via recorded scripts and monitor response time to get alerted of problems and slow downs. Many APM tools in this space (Gomez now AppDynamics, Catchpoint, SolarWinds APM, Ipswitch APM, etc.). If you have Citrix or Microsoft-hosted environment where an image of ...



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