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13

Trinity Rescue Kit (version 3.4) It is possible to boot TRK in three different ways: as a bootable CD which you can burn yourself from a downloadable isofile or a self burning Windows executable from a USB stick/disk (optionally also a fixed disk), installable from Windows or from the bootable TRK cd (which is easier and safer) from network ...


13

Here's what I've done (this assumes a single disk, at /dev/sda) use dd to backup the MBR and partition table: "dd bs=512 count=1 if=/dev/sda of=/backups/sda.layout" use rsync top copy the entire thing with something like: "rsync -axvPH --numeric-ids ..." On restore I do this: boot the target machine with sysrescuecd, I've probably got sda.layout on a ...


13

It sounds like what you really need is a configuration management system like puppet. With a proper setup, it should verify that everything is the way it is supposed to be setup on every puppet run. Periodically re-installing systems just to get them to a known state should not really be necessary, and sure seems like it will create a lot of work, that you ...


12

There are probably lots of different reasons why it's not enabled. My reason is that System Restore isn't the panacea that you think it is. You're restoring a computer back to a specific state (of the whole OS) at a particular point in time. Can you imagine the problems that could cause should you enable this on a server running AD or perhaps DNS or DHCP? ...


12

If you're looking for a Free/Open-Source Software tool, I can recommend http://www.clonezilla.org/


8

As a sysadmin I find it great benefit to have it enabled on users machines, when your called to a problem where it was 'working fine yesterday', and the user has no idea what they have changed since then, using a system restore can often quickly solve a problem, or just eliminate a settings change from being the cause of the problem. To be honest the cost ...


7

grml as in grml.org! :) It's designed as a Live System for system administrators. It provides: >2500 software packages 3 different flavours (grml, grml-medium, grml-small), all of them available as: 32bit and 64bit version LVM and software RAID support out of the box (including bootoptions for autoenabling them) support for booting via PXE/USB/... ...


6

You could look at some of the following: Ghost for Unix Partition Image Clonezilla, as mentioned above by mystikphish Device Image


5

Try looking on this Lifehacker article: Five Best Free System Restore Tools. I think Macrium Reflect Free is probably the best of the bunch.


5

Easiest option? Use a cloning utility such as Acronis or ShadowProtect to image directly onto the new drive. For free, ShadowProtect Server will give you 30 days, install, clone, done. *I'm not affiliated with either product, just someone who has used SP with enormous success in the past.


4

I never clone systems entirely. You never know what may change, and your system cloned image is already out of the date the moment one change occurs. The best way to do it is to establish a procedure that lets you produce functionally identical systems. One possibility is something like Kickstart, or AutoYaST or similar tools. Keep good backups of your ...


4

I always keep it disabled. I do this because of the cost to have the system maintain it in the background and on the hard disk (the disk space). I've never found it useful when I did have it on and I've never felt that feeling of "if only system restore was on" after something had happened. I think this feature could have benefits for an ignorant user ...


4

It's mostly moot in an office where you have a deployment strategy and network drives for your users' critical data. The threat of reimaging keeps most people here from getting too adventurous. This feature is a phenomenal godsend on the computers of family & friends who will call you in a state of complete panic exactly when you least want to talk ...


3

Image them over the network from a boot CD - dd and netcat can come to your rescue. http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/networking/?p=144 I know you said that the linked thread wouldn't work, but you really can use nc and dd to do this. Play with it before you implement it, but it will work. Edit This comment covers it well: ...


3

You can use BartPE for this. Find some good guides on setting it up here: http://www.nu2.nu/bootcd/ You'll need a full XP retail license for this, and even then there's some question.


3

The best solution would be, if WHS supports it, to restore the C: partition to your new single partition, then extract just the files from the D: partition and place them where you want on the new, restored system.


3

If none of those other image solutions work, for whatever reason, you can try Clonezilla. It's pretty stupid easy to use for the most part and I use it all the time for workstations at my current place of employment.


3

Main component of this feature is VSS. This can by achieved by setting up all your systems on LVM and using snapshots. Setup your system to periodically create and delete snapshots. Make sure you leave sufficient free space in your volume groups to hold enough snapshots for you to fit your requirements. OTOH it may be better to setup a central server ...


3

The 5505 is not capable of running in multiple context mode. This is probably just a bug. I would: backup your config: more system:running-config then save this config to a txt file wr erase to erase the startup config reload and say no when it asks you to save the current running configuration


3

Per your comment, I'm making this my answer. There isn't a "best" way...so much as there is a preferred method depending on what you are wanting to recover and the scope of the recovery. Because it appears you are using the built in Windows Backup utility: You can learn about the various methods to restore your 2008 server here: ...


2

Lots of features are left off by default. I personally think this is a good thing. It makes me research and understand ramifications of turning up some service or feature. For instance, while I agree about the usefulness of System Restore, it does use resources, and it may not work as advertised. Do I want some well meaning engineer (or more likely, a ...


2

Are there any usable, recent backups? Because the short answer to your question is "No" and the simplest way to deal with this mess would be to build a new system (this can be a virtual system if drivers are a problem) and restore from a backup. If this situation happens to you or anyone else reading this in the future then I'd suggest duplicating the disk ...


2

The quickest way would be to delete the second partition then use something like GParted (Boot CD) to resize the first partition to occupy all the free space. Alternatively delete both partitions (using GParted, WinPE, XP Setup Disk) then boot from the WHS restore disk and restore your most recent backup.


2

I know Symantec's Partition Magic is supposed to be able to do this. Maybe you can grab a free trial and give it a go. Edit: In case its unclear, I've never tried this myself and therefore cannot vouch for that software.


2

Besides Trinity, I also like Backtrack


2

Hiren's boot CD works for recovery but it really shines when you need to repartion or format drives, check hardware errors and fix file systems.


2

Did you try to follow the tutorial on the DriveSnapshot site: How to create a bootable CD/DVD?


2

I've yet to see a problem that both requires my intervention and is fixable by a System Restore. It eats disk space and CPU time when enabled, and also makes installing a lot of patches much more time-consuming- they all seem to want to create a restore point. In short, I've never seen anything useful in it, nor have I ever heard of anyone who's found it ...


2

You're taking a System State backup only. That will contain the registry (including COM+ registrations), and Active Directory and the SYSVOL (though I doubt it's installed on your web servers), Certificate Services database (which probably also isn't installed on your web servers), and the IIS Metabase. I can't say what you mean, specifically, when you talk ...


2

The main intention is to allow the OS greater chance of surviving things like a badly broken driver install, though I've personally never used it for that. The one time I have actually used it was after user managed to let a virus in, and rolling back to the restore point from the day before followed by an AV sweep fixed the issue where just the AV sweep ...



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