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21

The system state contains a number of items: System Registry COM + Database Certificate Services Active Directory SysVol IIS Metabase Some of these items are only included if the specified service is installed (AD, IIS, Certificates). If you need to restore a server, you will need this state to recover the registry, or your AD Domain, or IIS sites. You ...


11

The System State Backup should be part of your Windows Server backup plan and preparation for a disaster recovery. The System State contains the operating configuration files. Before you install a driver, patch or program on your server, consider, what will be your fall back position if the operating system crashes. You should create a System State backup ...


10

First of all, you're looking at things wrong. You're running Exchange and other services on your server as well as Active Directory and DNS. You're doing it wrong. You really want Domain Controllers to only run Active Directory and DNS. You'll run into serious performance issues down the road if you get a medium number of mailboxes in Exchange and it runs on ...


8

Regardless of what Microsoft says - it's possible to restore the system to basically ANY compatible hardware. Here how this works: (Windows 2000 & 2003 validated): Create a machine with identical CPU type (e.g x32 or x64 as the original server) Apply all the latest SP to it. Copy to C:\exclude folder (just as example) the following files: ...


7

Restore the System State portion of the backup on another machine running W2K3 or Windows XP, choosing the "Single Folder" option for the "Restore files to" and picking some sensible "Alternate location" (like a directory you make for that purpose). You'll be warned about how this is an "advanced" feature and that not all files will be restore. For your ...


5

So far, I've been able to come up with the following procedure, but I really hope there is some simpler way: Install the operating system on a new server Create a new "dummy" domain and make the server its domain controller Install the operating system on a second server Join the server to the "dummy" domain Install DPM on the second server and connect it ...


5

No, no, no. Just... no. The WinSxS folder (also known as the Windows side-by-side assembly folder) is required if you want your server to work. If you want to try to reduce its size, you can run a cleanup on it, but I'm very concerned for your data. A dozen GB is not big - and having lots of data is all the more reason to back something up, not an excuse ...


4

I havn't done much with this on server 2003 but it should be the same as in xp. The registry is the set of files stored in c:\windows\system32\config, the various files without any extension (DEFAULT, SAM, SECURITY, SOFTWARE, SYSTEM) are the actual registry hives and you can manually mount them in regedit by selecting something like HKEY LOCAL MACHINE then ...


4

We backup the DPM server separately (via command line schedeuled task) weeklyt, and DPM database daily. That way we can bootstrap the DPM server from non-DPM managed backups, and logon works with cached domain credentials. Then I can start restoring "real" backups from our virtual tape library. This works because the DPM server uses a local database with ...


3

The risks are as you stated, but I don't think your Exchange server should have a Single Point of Failure either. With two DC's you add in secondary DHCP, DNS, NTP, and authentication. Likewise, load balancing. My thinking would also be that you're not always thinking of worst case - say you lose DC1 for a few hours thanks to some bad hardware. You may be ...


2

Useful shelf life of a system-state backup of Active Directory Quote from the link about Tombstone Lifetime. Windows Server 2003 and Windows 2000 do not allow the restoring of old backup images into a replicated enterprise. Specifically, the useful life of a backup is the same as the "tombstone lifetime" setting for the enterprise. The ...


2

I do complete backups of our C: drives on select windows servers with system states weekly. We only bother to backup the OSes of machines which have things kept on the C: drive that aren't easily recreated. Many boxes are faster to rebuild than restore anyhow. The theory behind Weekly Fulls being stuff shouldn't be changing on those drives all that often. ...


1

Backup your DCs to Azure. It's extremely cheap (100GB costs $10/month) and super easy to use. Then the recovery of AD only requires the following: access to your Azure subscription - shouldn't be a problem the passphrase used for encrypting the Azure backups - save it offsite, to your pendrive where you store SSH/BitLocker/etc keys, or something Then you ...


1

Ok, my mistake, I was appending to media, thats why it grow so big!


1

I see the value in it. There may be a case (as rare as it might seem) that you'll want the System State, outside of your image backups. I've restored domain controllers from just the System State many times, without the need for full image backups.


1

Those the the Windows registry database files, so they are always open (as long as Windows is running). Backing up the registry through the proper utilities/facilities (e.g. ERD) will take care of any information you need to protect there.


1

I'm not certain what your situation is, but in my experience a full backup of a system is not necessary or even a good idea. (GASP!) Essentially, the best thing to do is have failsafe redundancy in the beginning (such as Master-Master replication on a mysql server), or Raid-1. (or 5 for best results). Basically, in my opinion and experience a ...


1

You can maybe ask the partition table in your Acronis image. I do that on Linux for virtual machines disks. Maybe it works for you too. Check on http://connaissances.fournier38.fr/display.php?id=328 (in French sorry) but the commands are easy to understand.


1

This question will have probably have multiple "right" answers but my opinions are below... I do system state backups on a weekly basis and incremental backups daily. If a server fails on say Thursday, I would restore from the weekly backup and then restore each daily incremental. The incremental backups are considerably quicker than the full system state ...


1

Microsoft seems to have issued a hotfix for this problem and error code. I would test it well, though.


1

Keep in mind that the System State includes the Registry. Whether anything changes the registry will depend on your server and the services installed. If any of those service definitions reside in the registry and the settings change, you will need to update the System State backup after any of those service definitions changes.


1

Complete backups of asolutely everything on the server here; full at weekends, differentials nightly. Considering the fairly minimal overhead that doing System State imposes on your backup in terms of both time and storage, there's no real reason not to do it.


1

We don't do full backups of C:, either, but we do back up system state nightly. If you use active directory, it's pretty important to keep regular system state backups from your DCs -- they don't take up that much space by themselves compared to a full backup of the entire drive, and if your backup is older than the DNS tombstone age (which is 60 days by ...


1

Windows in-built backup utility is basically useful. For regular office backup, I do the following A full backup for system state (maybe a system partition backup is necessary) File backup for those important data, and then do incremental file backup with daily rate(it means an automatic backup with pre-set schedules) For regular home pc ...



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