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102

The problem ended up being a poorly fit heatsink. Maybe poorly fit isn't the right description. Turns out, you have to put thermal paste on the heatsink, not the plastic cover that goes over the heatsink. After removing the plastic cover, the CPU is nice and cool, thanks everyone!


40

Recommendations on server room temperature vary greatly. This guide says that: General recommendations suggest that you should not go below 10°C (50°F) or above 28°C (82°F). Although this seems a wide range these are the extremes and it is far more common to keep the ambient temperature around 20-21°C (68-71°F). For a variety of reasons this can ...


23

In my experience, it is normal for paired components in a case to run at different temperatures, because airflow is not the same everywhere. Here's a graph of HDD temperature from my colo box. The drives are mirrored, so the workloads on them are near to identical. As you can see, they track each other, but they're not the same; they're also, on ...


18

Take a look a ITwatchdogs. Their weather goose line looks very nice. They monitor temp, light, sound, humidity, etc. Here's a list of vendors (not APC) that have other products. What I use in my data center appears to be a discontinued model. What ever you end up using, make sure that: They use SNMP, not some special protocol. Have remote temperature ...


13

38C should be fine. A quick look at some spec sheets shows that operating temperature is 0C to 60C on many models. You might be interested in section 3.4 of a study done by Google on hard drive failure rates. Temperature is not an issue in drives until they are a few years older, and even then, it seems, it's not much of an issue under 40C.


10

The sensor is likely in the PCIe cage area, above the P410i RAID controller on the motherboard. This would be the rear-right corner of the server chassis looking from the front of the server. "I/O Zone" in this context means the PCIe bus. Can you give us any detail about any PCIe cards installed in this server? Depending on what's installed, your fan speed ...


9

I'd personally let the server run or move it to a better running environment. This may not be worth automating. If you must shut down the entire host, please make sure that your VMs have the VMWare tools installed (to allow graceful shutdown and power up) and that they're set to stop and start with the host. You can use the vCli and schedule a cron job to ...


7

Google's datacenter best practices recommends 80 degrees. We run at 72, but then again I don't exactly trust our own room was designed with airflow in mind.


7

Just convert the estimated draw from Watts to BTUs: To calculate the BTUs/hour, multiply the watts by 3.413. 1 ton of cooling is equivalent to 12,000 BTU/hour. Most of the energy drawn will be converted to waste heat. From what I am reading, a pro would tell you to have someone come in and do the full calculation. That would take into effect any odd heat ...


7

According to the Google examination of over 100,000 drives, low and moderate temperature doesn't influence the life expectancy of disk drives. Certainly if you keep the internal temp below 45C, there's virtually no effect, and only the slightest of effect for above 45C. That doesn't mean go above the rated temp, however.


7

It would seem to make most sense to measure the air temperature on the front of the racks, where air is drawn in from.


7

It is not. Unless you have some serious issues with the airflow. Or one of the coolers is bad. Temperature WILL vary - but not that much (70 vs. 15 degree celsius). Given how low 15 degree is I would assume (a) your sensor is off (you really store the server in a that cool room?). I would also assume one of the CPU does simply no work at all, for whatever ...


6

According to Jeff Atwood... hard drives are typically rated to run up to 55C. Great post on this topic here: Hard Drive Temperatures: Be Afraid


6

If you were running Linux For CPU and board: lm_sensors + NetMRG or Nagios For disks: hddtemp or smartctl (smartmontools) + NetMRG or Nagios Since you are running Windows, speedfan may be of some use.


6

This is far from abnormal. This is my server's HDD temperatures over the past year: They are correlated, sure, but one runs about 7C hotter than the other. In my case I'm fairly sure it's down to airflow differences inside the case: one catches more of the flow from the case fan than the other. In the past, when I've swapped them round, the lines have ...


5

When you have to replace compound on an existing cooler, a common problem is, that the compound ends up sticking the heatsink to the processor, making it difficult to remove the cooler. You could use a hairdryer to heat the heatsink a little, in order to melt the thermal compound and then remove the heatsink moving it slightly in a lateral way. But I ...


5

A couple of specific answers and a suggestion ... 1- There are several makers (linked in other answers) of standalone temp and humidity monitoring devices. These are pretty simple .. typically you mount them where you want to monitor, plug them into the network, and configure them to email alerts. They work well. 2- Most servers can raise SNMP alerts ...


5

Rather than a remote-control winch, I'd say what you need is simply a remote-control power strip (and, ideally, an IP camera to monitor things). Flip on the outlet for the winch, wait (x) seconds or watch the video to know when, and then flip it back off. You could very easily script this into Nagios, and even include some elementary logic to try to guess ...


5

What does the manufacturer's datasheet/documentation have to say about temperature ?


5

Using awk: sensors | awk '/temp[124]/ {sub("°C", "", $2); print($2)}' Or comma separated: sensors | awk -v ORS=, '/temp[124]/ {sub("°C", "", $2); print($2)}' | sed 's/,$//'


5

It might, but probably not significantly. Replacing the aircon really is the only option. Let me guess, it's a small room, and the aircon just can't keep the temperature low? There's probably not enough air in the room to outweigh the thermal output of the servers. So you'll get the situation where it's not possible to cool the air fast enough to keep it ...


4

My server room is set to 69 degrees. We have one air conditioning unit that services that room and it runs 24/7 to keep the room at 69 degrees year round.


4

I recently needed to fix a problem with an over-heating machine. I found this video very helpful: NCIX Tech Tips #11- Installing Thermal Compound Basically, the steps are: Remove heat sink Use 100% Isopropal alcohol and lint free cleaning rag (microfiber works well) to clean both the CPU and the heat sink Apply a small amount of compound Spread compound ...


4

Usually, server hardware will have temperature sensors pollable via IPMI. This is true back to all the servers I have, even generic brands, to about 2002... and is also true for my home PC. On linux, you can access this information using the ipmitool. Some servers also expose it to snmp if you have the appropriate MIB for your vendor. Servers without an ...


4

I'm a big fan of PRTG Network Monitor from www.paessler.com. Its a packaged Windows version of MRTG (or at least inspired by it), and does all sorts of useful data collection, graphing, notification, etc. Its inexpensive and has saved my butt. I also use an environmental monitor from IT Watchdogs. I think I paid $400 bucks for it, and I have at least one ...


4

Yes, don't load the server up. But seriously, if you have a CPU thermal issue, it's best to take care of it now, and not later. It's not very good for (sensitive) electronics to be continually overheated and put back to work. I'm not familiar with cpufreqd, does it throttle frequency based on current load? If so, it may be scaling frequency back up when ...


4

The dew point is a measure of how cold the air would have to get right now before water started spontaneously condensing out of it - or how cold a piece of equipment brought into the room would have to be in order to condense water on its surface. Naturally, having water on things is a bad idea in a server room, so you don't want the dew point to get too ...


4

Does this depend on server hardware vendor? Or does this depend solely on server operating system? Either/both - if a server has temperature sensors, and some don't, then they can have hard limits set in BIOS usually, but the OS or drivers inside could override those thresholds for whatever reason. So yes, either/both - you need sensors either way, ...


3

We use the MiniGoos products from http://www.itwatchdogs.com/. I will admit I wasn't involved in the evaluation process for these, but I really like the product. They allow multiple temperature sensors and they have some nifty add ons like air flow monitoring (which we aren't currently using) and things like door open/close detection (which we are). They ...



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