Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

Your terminology like "using LDAP to log in" makes me think that you're not really very familiar with Windows Server. I think you'd do well to look at hiring an outside consultant to help you get this put together. Active Directory Group Policy can do what you're looking for in a fairly simple manner. You'd create Organizational Units (OUs) to house the ...


2

Windows already stores "password verifiers," more commonly known as "cached credentials," of users when they log on to the machine. By default it will store something like 10 of them, meaning that the eleventh user to log on will overwrite the cached credentials of the 1st person who logged on, and so forth. This number is easily changed with either Group ...


1

I'm not sure what you mean by "force the logoff of that user via GUI" so you might be referring to this, but I'll throw it out there anyway: My GUI method is to open Task Manager on the server, go to the Users tab, then right click the user's session and choose Log Off. If that fails to actually log off the session or their session isn't listed there, then ...


1

Please re-install the terminal Services, but before that please change ' Restrict each user to one session ' to 'No' and than change it to 'yes' and even if your issue doesn't resolve than only re-install Terminal Services.


1

Since I asked this question we've moved off 2003 and are using User Profile Disks with 2012r2 (they were introduced with 2012): The simpler way is user profile disks. User profile disks store user and application data on a single virtual disk that is dedicated to one user’s profile [...] User profile disks provide an easy way to store the user settings ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible