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14

I have always known it as above = parent directory or higher below/under = child directory or subdirectory outside = anything not in a directory or child directory thereof I have never heard otherwise. Your two examples don't really contradict, either.


13

I would tend to think of these as different environments.


11

I use "bounce" all the time in the context of cycling something-- "Bouncing a service", "Bouncing a server", "Bouncing a router", etc. I'd use it interchangeably with "restart", "reboot", or "power cycle". It seems to be slightly regional, being most popular in the Midwest, Northeast, and West coast. The term seems to have originated in the IBM, VAX, and ...


11

Box, System, or Machine. "CPU" seems like a silly term to refer to the whole system. "Computer" is usually good enough but sometimes lacks sufficient specificity to exclude the monitor, keyboard, etc.


11

FAST = RAID0 SAFE = RAID1 BIG = JBOD SAFE33 and SAFE50 are modified and combined versions of RAID. You may want to refer to the Sans Digital's RAID definitions for more information. Official descriptions follow. SAFE 33 RAID mode SAFE33 allows the creation of two hard drive volumes where 1/3 (33%) of the volume is used for mirroring and the rest is ...


11

It's an HP gui-ism. It could certainly be worded better. The Cisco equivalent is shutdown and the way that it displays a port in that state is 'Administratively disabled'.


10

It's a "box"... if it's under the desk, in a rack, or somewhere out there on the network... to me, it's just a box! Sample usage: "Has that box got a console, or will I have to remote in?" "Damn DNS box dropped its guts again!" "Second rack from the left, third box down, the one with no lights on..." "Just flick the box..." (tr: simply restart the ...


10

All of those entries are domain names per RFC 1034 and RFC 1035. If they also had the (typically implicit) trailing dot that represents the root they would be fully qualified domain names. The individual components of a domain name are called labels. These cannot exceed 63 characters in length. A label can include any octet from \000 to \377. If a ...


10

The latter. .uk is a CCTLD, or Country Code Top-Level Domain; .co.uk is a subdomain thereof. The whole of the .uk namespace is operated by Nominet Ltd. For many years, direct registration under .uk hasn't been allowed, and the namespace has been split into the subdomains we know and love (including .co.uk, .org.uk, .net.uk, .me.uk, .parliament.uk, and so ...


9

No, there is no specific name for that combination for logging on. Many people have their own name for it but Microsoft never gave it a name and no pseudo standard has ever evolved. The use of ".\" was used because it was already used for file system addressing and it made sense to extend it to machine reference. The nearest it ever came to getting an ...


8

A gateway and a router are essentially the same. The term "default gateway" is used to mean the router on your LAN which has the responsibility of being the first point of contact for traffic to computers outside the LAN. If your LAN has multiple routers, the router designated as a default gateway can notify your computer, using an ICMP redirect or other ...


7

I have always referred to it as the computer. I don't consider peripherals like keyboards and monitors to be part of the computer. Very often I will be more specific as to the type of computer, desktop, tower, laptop, and so on. The only usage that bugs me is that a number of people I work with have started referring to their desktop or towers as hard ...


7

Best guess: They used "VPN Consolidator" as a synonym for "VPN Concentrator". There is no hard'n'fast definition of a VPN concentrator either; it's generally just a device which is dedicated to being endpoint for (many) VPNs. Say you had a good DMZ & dual firewall setup that is working well, and you don't want to change it. A new need for a large'ish ...


7

As Lucas says, FX normally refers to a type of fibre, but that's not how this company is using the term. Instead, FX refers this company's inclusion of an FPGA that has access to 8 of the ports. People who buy this switch can either buy or develop their own applications that can be loaded on the FPGA and can process data as it passes through the switch. ...


6

Silo, or environment? The term "silo" is frequently used in Citrix XenApp environments to indicate a group of servers that serve the same app or set of apps.


6

"Subnet" In a perfect would, we might refer to each grouping as a subnet, based on their network subnet mask, from which their interconnectivity is defined at the base of the network architecture [+1]. In this way all nodes would be relatable to their grouping based on their use of distinct private IP addresses under the appropriate geographically ...


5

The term that comes to mind is WORM (Write once, read many). This is typically applied to types of backup media where bits cannot be modified once written.


4

I think the correct term industry standard term is "base unit". However a lot of people and not just end-users do refer to them as CPUs which obviously stands for Central Processing Unit, which usually means the actual microprocessor chip but it does also make some sense to mean the larger box as it does do the processing! Many people do also refer to them ...


4

I think they mean Don’t use it in a production environment. or more accurate to your question: a live operating environment == a production environment, or production machines on which you do your daily business Edit: Do you intend to install it on your personal laptop/desktop? Then I think it's no problem. As long as you don't make any money ...


4

A definition (although many can be brought up): You're running an application on some servers. Somewhere. You can't exactly pinpoint where exactly these servers are. You have no idea what they could be doing otherwise. Or how many of them you are using simultaneously. You buy the computing power, but the exact hardware behind it is no longer specifiable. ...


4

I'm surprised that you would ask, actually. The analogy is with depictions of family trees where the parents are shown above the children. I too have never heard any other interpretation. (if someone knows of a family tree shown with the parents below the children it's upside down)


4

A - This is the root node, which is also referred to as "$/" So, the path you have in the picture (A\B\C) would be $/CustomerTools/Database Prior to TFS 2010, the root folder resides at TFS server level, so $/ is techncally the server root folder. TFS 2010 introduced a new concept named a Team Project Collection (TPC), and so in later versions $/ ...


4

Check out the Wikipedia article for a lot more detail. InfiniBand is something like a cross between a device interconnect standard like PCI and a networking technology like Ethernet, but with a higher-level command set ("verbs") than just unicast and multicast data packets. It's meant to connect compute resources in a very high speed, very low latency, and ...


4

In a DNS file, the "@" symbol is a placeholder used to represent "the current domain". The @ symbol in your DNS record refers to the record for your domain name without any www or sub-domain name.


3

RDP always requires a login; even if it's automatic. There is no way to do an "anonymous" login, they have to have some set of credentials. An Interactive Login (as defined by MS for Windows Sessions) is one where you are presented a desktop environment that is not shared with another user (these sessions can be viewed by admin users with appropriate ...


3

I have created "Data Scrubbing" routines to periodically check and fix database problems that may not be practical to check in real-time (i.e. check for errors, inconsistencies, or duplicates as the data is entered). A scrubbing routine can fix specific types of errors such as checking that zip code entry matches the city/state or maybe look for variations ...



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