Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

You would make TFTP access over the internet secure the same way you'd make access to anything over the internet secure. By going through a VPN. Cisco's IP phones can be set up to use a VPN, and someone even put together a handy doc around common issues with this setup that you might want to take a look at.


9

Then you can't do it. You've rejected another protocol that permits authenticating the requestor (hcsteve's answer) and you've rejected a VPN which would have allowed TFTP to be tunneled through an authenticated service (Hopeless N00b.*'s answer), so you're stuck with stock TFTP. RFC 1350 makes it fairly clear, in section 1, that authentication is not an ...


8

I don't see how it could have ever worked if the client doesn't respond to ARP. You can't send packets to the IP address without knowing the MAC address, and that's where ARP comes in. If the client doesn't respond to ARP then it's broken.


6

While you can set up a second DHCP server on a network, there is no reliable way to get a computer to prefer its responses. More importantly, though, you should not be trying to circumvent your company's policy. This is unprofessional. If you need access to the DHCP server, make a case for it to your manager.


6

No, tftp is fixed to run on port 69. You cannot change this. Well, you can as most server allows you to change the port, but the client especially the ones embedded in hardware will ask tftp on port 69. If you really want that you must use iptables to redirect traffic from 69 to your arbitrary chosen one.


6

This solution works on Mac OS X Lion. There already is one: sudo launchctl load -F /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/tftp.plist sudo launchctl start com.apple.tftpd And, assuming you don't have a typo in either your subject or problem description: sudo launchctl load -F /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/ftp.plist sudo launchctl start com.apple.ftpd


6

The 1st thing I've spotted was that you are using "-s /tftpboot" in xinetd.conf and adding the dhcpd.conf "root-path" option. Setting the "-s" option for tftpd means that is the "/" directory as seen for tftp client. So your dhcpd.conf should only have "filname /pxeboot", without the root-path option. From "man tftpd": -s Change root directory on ...


5

This is addressed here. Sadly, it seems to be difficult or impossible, given the constraints on the TFTP protocol. > Hi. > > Has there ever been any consideration to allowing the tftp server to > provide dynamic content? > Yes. The protocol makes it difficult. You pretty much have to guarantee that the contents is ...


5

Your /etc/xinet.d/tftp configuration file is correct. The permissions of /tftpboot should be 755 or drwxr-xr-x. Make sure chkconfig --list shows tftp enabled under xinetd. xinetd based services: chargen-dgram: off chargen-stream: off daytime-dgram: off . . rsync: on tcpmux-server: off ...


4

You shouldn't be creating your own DHCP service at all without the permission of the network and system administrators, in fact doing so without their permission should be a firing offence. It's exactly this kind of behaviour which underlines why DHCP in anything but a client-only environment is dangerous. So to reiterate - don't do this, it's wrong.


4

It's there, you just have to enable it: Starting the TFTP server on Mac OS X Leopard (sudo needed) (Note this does not work with Mac OS X Lion): To start the TFTP server, in the terminal window, type: /sbin/service tftp start Your TFTP default folder path will be: /private/tftpboot To Stop the TFTP server, type: /sbin/service tftp stop To test you ...


3

Are you starting tftpd with the -s option? Some clients may be expecting this, e.g. uploading a file called foo to /foo is really intended for /tftpboot/foo on the server. Adding -s /tftpboot essentially tells the server to do a "chroot" to that directory. Try running tftpd manually, e.g. not via xinetd, and see what the output is. You can also try ...


3

A better design would be to generate all config files and cache them in the tftpboot directory rather than trying to generate them on the fly. Ideally the filename your devices request would be unique or identifiable and you could pre-generate files based on that.


3

Add eth0 to your INTERFACES line in /etc/default/isc-dhcp-server.


3

I found another, better solution to this problem. I couldn't believe that the people who wrote the selinux policy files didn't think that people would need tftp uploads so I did some digging. I couldn't find anything on the internet that isn't already referenced here but by searching the selinux policy I was able to find another security context already on ...


3

for "no default or ui configuration directive found" try change from KERNEL vmlinuz-2.6.35-25-generic-pae APPEND ....optopns... to DEFAULT vmlinuz-2.6.35-25-generic-pae ....options... or use UI menu. it help me with ubuntu 10.10 pxeboot.0


3

Why not specify a tftp server that's a hop away? As long as your clients are receiving the appropriate default gateway this might be the easiest way to go. That said, if you must support multiple interfaces - It's possible to run multiple instances of dhcpd. Each would have its own configuration that would include entries to specifically bind said ...


3

Many of your problems are handled by configuration management tools like Puppet, Chef or cfengine. It works differently than you envision it, but it's the goal that matters, right? With e.g. Puppet, you install the basic OS (might be from an image), with a Puppet client and then Puppet handles the installation/configuraton of the software. To a degree, ...


3

Cisco Small Business (SPA3xx, SPA5xx) phones support provisioning over HTTPS with mutual SSL authentication - the client can authenticate the provisioning server and the server can also authenticate the client based on the client's built-in certificate. That's the way to do it securely over the internet - forget about TFTP. See the full provisioning guide ...


3

It's a tftp server, so you'll need to use a tftp client.


3

Yes, it is absolutely possible. The Ubuntu Way The "Ubuntu Way" (which is also the Debian way) would be to set up a local apt repository, and configure your client systems to get their updates from there. The Ask Ubuntu question above (which Deer Hunter graciously provided for me to steal the link to) has a pretty good description of what's involved, and ...


2

Found the problem It was the VMware NIC type. I was using the VNXNET3, once I changed to E1000 everythings works as expected. Apparently, the problem still exists in vSphere 5. http://communities.vmware.com/thread/215456


2

Settings those permissions is absolutely not needed. Furthermore, you could set the permissions to allow only the user running the TFTP server to read the files. No execution permissions are needed in any of the files under the PXE root directory. As a matter of fact, I'm using TFTP/PXE on Debian under /srv/tftp, being /srv a separate LV mounted noexec


2

The tftp bit has worked: the kernel is loaded and attempting to mount the root filesystem. It looks like the NFS server you're trying to mount isn't responding. Check from another client that you can actually mount /nfsroot from your server (assuming you followed the naming convention in the HOWTO).


2

The error was on my TFTP server. I changed the following line on my /etc/xinetd.d/tftp file: server_args = -s /var/tftpboot/ to this: server_args = -c -s /var/tftpboot/ And the problem is solved. The missing -c option allows new files to be created on the TFTP server.


2

Yes, this is possible although it may or may not work with your (unspecified) equipment. You need to tell the router(with dhcpd) to provide the address of the tftp server and the file name to request. How you do this is very much dependant on router(with dhcpd). For example pfsense Other router(with dhcpd) will be different.


2

As answer 1, you might just disable dhcp on your router and move that role to a configurable box, like your CentOS Server A simple sample config might be (dhcpd.conf): subnet 192.168.2.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 { option domain-name-servers 192.168.2.1, 8.8.8.8; option routers 192.168.2.1; range 192.168.2.20 192.168.2.100; authoritative; } ...


2

Nothing bad will happen, assuming that it is actually registering the same DLL. The exact same - path and version. If there's nothing wrong with it and your system, it will succeed, even if it has already been registered.


2

TFTP server on it's own does not have any reason to exist. And because of that, there's no such option in DHCP (it's like specifying HTTP server in DHCP. Unless you know what is it for, it's useless). From what I've read, polycom can download their configuration from HTTP and FTP, not only TFTP. They use DHCP options 160 and 66 for configuration URL, option ...


2

TFTP over internet is never a good approach. you will run into several problems with firewalls,NAT, and timeout related aborted transfers. Considering your constraints probably you should think of securely distributing (i.e. a password protected download) the phone configuration file with a small footprint portable TFTP server; then when the update is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible