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For people like me who intend to modify the files and want to retain the original timestamp (e.g. you update the meta tags of your music library). It's based on the solution provided by Stone. However, here about the modification time and a working script to restore the timestamps. FIRST do step one, then start working with your files. Preserve old ...


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Perl is probably installed, so you can do timestamp=$( some process ) # timestamp=201607130319 perl -se ' use Time::Local; if ($ts =~ /^(\d{4})(\d\d)(\d\d)(\d\d)(\d\d)$/) { $time = timelocal(0,$5,$4,$3,$2-1,$1-1900); $now = time; if (abs( $time - $now ) > 600) { print "more than 10 minutes\n"; } }...


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Baiscally this is: YYYYMMDDhhmmss.Timezone YYYY Year four digits MM month two digits, zero padded DD day two digits, zero padded hh hour of day, 24h-system, zero padded mm minutes, zero padded ss secondy, zero padded The part behind "." is most probably the time zone in relation to UTC or GMT.


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In my case the following command fixed the problem with missing SYN/ACK replies from Linux server: sysctl -w net.ipv4.tcp_tw_recycle=0 I think it is more correct than disabling TCP timestamps, as TCP timestamps are useful after all (PAWS, window scaling, etc). The documentation on the tcp_tw_recycle explicitly states that it is not recommended to enable ...


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In my case the following command fixed the problem with missing SYN/ACK replies from Linux server: sysctl -w net.ipv4.tcp_tw_recycle=0 I think it is more correct than disabling TCP timestamps, as TCP timestamps are useful after all (PAWS, window scaling, etc). The documentation on the tcp_tw_recycle explicitly states that it is not recommended to enable ...



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