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0

Have you tried using the rolling update settings in elastic beanstalk? That way it deploys to one at a time whilst leaving the other in service


1

You have a couple of options: Remove the out-of-the-box ROOT/ directory from tomcat and rename your war file to ROOT.war before deploying it. Deploy your war as (from your example) war_name.war and configure the context root in conf/server.xml to use your war file : <Context path="" docBase="war_name" debug="0" reloadable="true"></Context> ...


2

Apache httpd added HTTP/2 support from 2.4.21 but suggest you run latest (2.4.23 at time of writing) as this module is still changing quite a bit at the moment. Tomcat has just added HTTP/2 support in Tomcat 9: https://readlearncode.com/configure-tomcat-9-for-http2/ So in theory this should all fit together nicely if you're willing to upgrade to those ...


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You have to define your virtual hosts in server.xml. Reference: Bug 48674


3

You can use something like this within a wrapper script that calls catalina.sh, so that future upgrades of Tomcat will not overwrite your changes. if [ "$(whoami)" != "webuser" ]; then echo "Please start this process as 'webuser'" >&2 exit 1 fi


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Use the Java keytool to create a keystore and import the certificates needed there keytool -importcert -file my_domain.cer -keystore mykeystore.jks


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You can implement HTTP proxy, https proxy and non-http proxy also in tomcat. You need to update two files i.e, ../bin/Catalina.sh and ../conf/cataliana.properties. Detailed configuration and steps are mentioned here : http://w3devops.com/add-http-https-proxy-http-non-proxy-jenkins-via-tomcat-server/


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One option you could do is setup a nginx reverse proxy with the backend endpoint set as the TLS1.x endpoint. Then set the nginx front-end to support TLS1 (or whatever transport encryption you need). If you're running it on localhost and have it bound to that interface, there's not really a worry about the lower encryption level (as it's only traveling on ...


2

Since 4.5 the Linux kernel supports the SOCK_DESTROY operation, allowing one to destroy sockets (including those connected to TCP/IP connections) e.g., with ss(8). For example here is an ssh session: $ set | grep SSH_CLIENT SSH_CLIENT='127.0.0.1 52266 22' $ Seeing the connection with ss: # ss dst 127.0.0.1:52266 Netid State Recv-Q Send-Q Local ...


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Actually i'm using tomcat 7.0.70 with jdk6 on a centos 6.8 I followed the update wrote by marplesoft about the presence on gitub of a specfile, here: https://github.com/bdwyertech/rpm-tomcat7 A small modification to the "version" field of specfile, to use tomcat 7.0.70, and then the installation went smootly. Actually tomcat is up, but there are no ...



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