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21

Don't tar. Use rsync -av to preserve permissions while transfering the files. Though like tar, this does not preserve selinux context. Not that I would consider that important though.


13

You probably want to buy more disk space, but assuming you don't, you could... pipe the tarball around rather than downloading it. newserver# ssh olduser@oldserver "cat /path/to/tarball" | tar xf - or if you don't have SSH access to your old server newserver# wget -O - http://oldserver/path/to/tarball | tar xf - or use rsync like Dennis said. Be ...


5

I figured it out! For posterity, here's what I did: I killed the MySQL server I copied /usr/local/mysql/support-files/my-small.cnf to /etc/my.cnf I opened my.cnf and added this line in the [mysqld] section: # point the datadir to the old stuff on the external hard drive datadir = /Volumes/Clone/usr/local/mysql/data I saved and closed my.conf I restarted ...


4

Take a look at the --delete option: --delete delete extraneous files from dest dirs something like this: /usr/bin/rsync -avz --delete --ignore-existing /document/root/ user@newserver:/document/root/ You may also use the --checksum option instead of uses a "quick check" by default.


4

Try it like this: nc -u -l 7777 > newfile.jpg #on the destination machine cat file.jpg | nc -u 192.168.x.x 7777 #on the source machine Usually you want the machine getting the file to "listen" (run that first), and when it's listening, send the data over udp. UDP does not have a 'handshake' sequence, and packets are sent immediately, even if noone is ...


4

Some of these things depend on the version of SMB you're talking about. There are a number of different dialects and "flavors". There have been entire books written about SMB/CIFS-- you're talking about a fairly broad topic. The original SMB dialect, over TCP/IP, sends commands across a single TCP connection between the client and the server. There is no ...


4

The obvious way to keep it private is through use of firewalls and not publishing the tracker outside of your office. Trackers themselves do need to be published, as I remember. The basic problem that BitTorrent is solving is how to get thousands of people to efficiently download at high speed from a point source on the Internet. The bottleneck in this ...


4

There are two benefits of bittorrent: Files are distributed and therefore less likely to go away. Fast file transfer thanks to many people serving a file. In a LAN the connection is usually the limiting speed factor, not the server. The benefit of distributed files is often not needed because there is usually a reliable server. Bittorrent is quite bad ...


4

You could mount the remote ftp server using curlftpfs under /mnt/ftpserver/ for example and then backup your database using mysqldump --all-databases --opt > /mnt/ftpserver/mysql_backup.sql Alternatively you can perform the mysqldump and then use lftp to push the backup file to the ftp server using something like lftp -c "open -u ...


4

I've used escrow.com a few times to facilitate domain transfers for my organization. You send escrow.com the money, do the domain transfer through your registrar of choice, and once you've confirmed the transfer is complete, they release the funds to the seller. There is some added to cost to doing it this way however.


3

This is difficult to say with any certainty as you don't provide any details whatsoever. That said if the machine has the same motherboard, disk controller (in the same slot) and disks (again in the same cabling configuration) you should be just fine.


3

BitTorrent is great for distributing files where you don't need a big server (farm) hosting the file, as clients also become servers and as the popularity of the file grows, so does the capacity for distributing the file. This is where the brilliance of BT lies, and why it is a very good for low/no-budget operations to distribute data to a large "audience". ...


3

Frankly, the web hosting companies that I've dealt with (on behalf of our customers) weren't very good with DNS. My recommendation would be to move your DNS to a company that specializes in DNS, like DynDNS or the registar that the domain was registered with, if it was one of the major registrars like Network Solutions, GoDaddy, etc.


3

Depends on the NAS. Many QNAP devices support this natively, for example. I'm not sure about other brands or NAS software implementations.


3

Sometimes believe it or not the best answer is cut a tape/USB/CD/DVD (or whatever) and use FED-EX to the remote site...or if local walk over and feed it into the new server.


3

Is there a faster method.. would scp or rsync increase the download speed on the new server. scp would not be any faster - there would be a slight overhead of the secure connection, but its negligible. rsync would only be faster if you already had some files on the destination server - that way you aren't copying everything wholesale. However in your ...


2

The approach I would use would be based on the new structure. For every table in the new structure, come up with a SQL query that pulls data from the old structure and drops it into a basic CSV format, then import to the new structure. I'm glossing over things like making sure keys match, ensuring you always get the same representation of data sets with the ...


2

There is another program called bar that also provides this functionality. Bar is a simple tool to copy a stream of data and print a display for the user on stderr showing (a) the amount of data passed, (b) the throughput of the data transfer, and (c) the transfer time, or, if the total size of the data stream is known, the estimated time remaining, what ...


2

Preface I'm afraid, here isn't a best place to ask such type of questions: in order to get full detailed answer, we have to cover some deep details of DNS and SMTP. It's a problem for local users here, but not (I hope) on ServerFault Face You done almost all correctly, I, maybe, only decreaseвd TTL for MX RR before changing data and would wait ...


2

First thing you should do is this: chown -R mysql:mysql /usr/local/mysql/data You should find out how big the InnoDB files are ibdata1 ib_logfile0 ib_logfile1 If ibdata1 is < 20M, and ib_logfile0 = 5M, then mysql was running without a my.cnf in place. You should be able to startup mysql. If they are different sizes, you need to create my.cnf with ...


2

If you haven't tried this already, you can use SQL management studio to do scheduled backups of the database files. I've never tried such a large file to a remote site, but I've had it handle remote sites and much larger files than 50 GB fine, on separate jobs. Or, failing that, have you tried robocopy? Robocopy should work "fine," is easily scriptable, ...


2

As you noted, AFP supports server side copies. The latest unreleased version of gvfs contains a number of improvements to gvfsd-afp to make it more reliable and faster. In my tests, it is able to get about 70MB/s for a large transfer on 1GBE and is able to duplicate a directory of 10000 files in 11 seconds which is not too bad. If server side copies are ...


2

Based on your comment about using the copy command in cpanel I would suggest you are probably running out of diskspace. You mentioned you do have ssh access available and I an unfamiliar with cpanel so if you can ssh into the server you should check your diskspace with the following command: df -h There is also a possibility that you are running out of ...


2

WinSCP has transfer resume capability. It's a graphical client rather than command-line but, as graphical clients go, it's very nice.


2

It is probably because the new line has higher latency. I recommend you go read "It's the Latency, Stupid" (Not calling you stupid, that happens to be the title.) Lots of webpage requests are going to be small, so latency becomes a significant factor because it is the initial delay in the request and delivery of a page.


2

How are you deciding how quickly the transfer is occurring? Note that the transfer speeds that you notice are limited by the slowest link in the chain between you and the server. If you are testing transfer rates by loading a page in your browser, you're probably being limited by whatever network speed you have available through cable/DSL/whatever. If you ...


2

I'm unsure why you do it so complicated. Just issue a manual SMTP connection to the server. If it sends the greeting, then you know that it is online. If yes then continue to send the rest of the mail. Measure the time between connection and disconnection and you have the time used for sending and delivery. Done. On the server you can discard the mail.


2

Do the upgrade to R2 on the existing server Back it up Restore it to the new hardware


2

when you transfer the calls, asterisk will search for the extension in your current context so if someone calls using "sales" he will be able to transfer only to extensions 41XX, if you want to let him transfer to extensions 40XX then you should add 40XX to sales context, example: [sales] include => out-trunksip exten => _41XX,1,Answer exten => ...


2

You need a client that can handle this. lftp (mirror -R , see http://www.russbrooks.com/2010/11/19/lftp-cheetsheet ) and ncftp (put -R) are two.



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