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9

First I must mention that I myself am not a sysadmin although I do some sysadmin type of stuff at my startup (I'm a programmer first). However, I have the following contributions to this thread: Everyone is correct that you should install and administer your own Linux box (and eventually Linux server). Start off using it as a desktop user (if you haven't ...


6

You can read as many books and websites as you want, but you're not going to really learn until you do some hands on work. Get yourself some cheap switches and/or routers on Ebay or somewhere and set yourself a home lab and start playing. Set yourself some projects and some goals, then when you get into problems, start looking for the solutions online or in ...


3

Becoming a good sysadmin takes a few years. Seeing that youtube has a video length limit of about 10 minutes, you would have to watch about 50.000 videos. Seriously: get going by setting up a linux system at home, best start with virtual machines that you can screw up, and do more and more advanced things that you personally want or need. Nothing beats ...


2

One of the "bast bang for the buck" would be to acquire a layer 3 switch. A ton of networking technologies in one box - switching and routing. If you can find any in stock, Asus has a very capable layer 3 switch for under $100 USD. It's not a Cisco, but has a very comparable technologies/features line-up and will at least provide you a chance towards ...


2

Slightly dated, but the following articles go over a few of the differences including startup scripts, kernel, software installation, etc.: Comparing GNU/Linux and FreeBSD FreeBSD for Linux Users


2

If you don't mind buying a book I found Absolute FreeBSD 2nd edition to be a very good guide to FreeBSD. Covering both running it on both the laptop/desktop and server.


2

This should apply (mostly) to all versions to at least getting you up and running: VMWare Server on Ubuntu Graphical stuff included. The Infrastructure Web Access GUI in that HOWTO is really easy and elsewhere on that site you can read up on Remote Console access too if you need offline access to the VMs (which is very handy occasionally). --edit-- I ...


2

Probably a good start here: http://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide I've been a professional Python developer for almost 8 years now. Loving every second of it! Previous to that I worked exclusively in C.


1

Your concerns and lack of knowledge will be addressed having something like Plesk or Cpanel. You still need to have a basic understanding and from a support point of view you will need to know what your on about when someone email's you and says I'm tyring to set up an SPF record in DNS can you check to see if mine is ok? Cpanel/Plesk whilst do all the ...


1

You'll find a lot of resources on the web. It's really hard to pin down exactly all the knowledge you'll need. But we can start with some basics. IBM has an excellent Developer Works website. Tons of tutorials and "why"'s answered. Maybe start with the Windows-to-Linux roadmap series. It's a general introduction to a lot of important topics. Let me also ...


1

I suggest you get hold of a copy of cisco packet tracer software which is a sort of virtual network simulation. It'll teach you how to setup routers and switches, including right down to the actual commands you need to run on them (cisco gear, anyway). It'll also go a far way towards helping if you decide to do a CCNA or similar in the future. Might be ...


1

My recommendation is the book Computer Networks by Tanenbaum... gives a great overview of networking functionality and protocols - I found this an excellent book to actually read cover-to-cover, and you can fill in the gaps by googling. It won't make you an expert overnight, but will give you a superb grounding. I originally read it as part of my degree and ...


1

TCP/IP Illustrated - the networking bible CISCO has good docs on networking A Linux/BSD box to practice


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this will not help you becoming sysadmin 'from scratch', nevertheless i find following highly entertaining and somehow sysadmin-related: archives of chaos communication congress - bits and pieces about security, low-level hacks . recordings from 2008. talks at nanog. mostly network-related subjects. various talks about infrastructures of companies like ...


1

Install a Linux system on a machine, play with it, read serverfault questions and answers, apply them. It takes time to acquire experience. Sysadmin is a job, and most advanced linux sysadmins have a position of an engineer. I don't know how you can learn to be an engineer with merely videos on YouTube, but you can get the knowledge with personal ...


1

http://www.howtoforge.com/ Here is a tutorial site on many how-to's in linux. They even have different flavors of linux and many of the resources you are looking for. Also, these are kinda poorly organized, but there is some useful info. http://www.faqs.org/docs/howtos1.html http://www.faqs.org/docs/howtos2.html http://www.faqs.org/docs/howtos3.html You ...


1

If you are looking for guides to getting you started, besides the FreeBSD handbook which is amazing there is BSDguides.org, while slightly dated in terms of material and the website itself it is still very good and contains a lot of information for people looking for particular solutions to problems.



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