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Dan is (was) most likely correct. I used this post and another to solve my problem, I have a VMWare Linux Mint 17.1 that has a similar issue. A few minutes after it is started 90-100% of the CPU is consumed for 15 or so minutes--it has a rather large shared directory that has a lot of genetic data in it. I used top to get the find process id (12788). Since ...


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You should make an user group / groups and give that group / groups write permission to your /var/www directories. This way you don't need to mess up with Apache's permissions to /home directories.


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The IP:PORT issue isn't/wasn't an issue for me (Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS). It can be misleading to assume postgrey is breaking/exiting on local port attach/execution failure. First check to see if daemon is recognized as running : sudo service postgrey status If it is not running/recognized, you will still see : warning: problem talking to server [::1]:10023: ...


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I've finally found the problem, and it wasn't a server issue. It was a setting in the client, Putty. X11 Forwarding was enabled, and caused all the issues. Switched that off.


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This means that latest Nginx might have been installed on some other location. paste the output of below command ps -ef|grep nginx


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I think it is a good idea to enable unattended-upgrades. I have used unattended-upgrades for years on both debian stable and ubuntu lts releases and never found a problem with it. Just as long as you only enable the security updates, and perhaps the regular updates. And unattended-upgrades will not update something if it needs user input Generally ...


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My rule of thumb is that I leave security (and often non-security, also) update enabled on virtual machines, but I manually schedule a system update on bare-metal instances. After all, with a VM and a good backup strategy is very easy to recover, while with bare-metal things become more complex.


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In an ideal world in addition to your production servers you have additional non-production systems intended to test both (updates to) your own applications as well as the OS. Only once you have validated in that test environment that non of the updated software components break your existing configuration should those be applied to your production ...


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It depends on what your machine does ultimately. Does it run mission critical applications that can not crash EVER? Probably not the best for auto updates then. Is it sitting on the egress point of your network? probably a good candidate. It comes down to weighing security vs stability and finding what your acceptable compromises are. Most likely you're not ...


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Yes. You should enable these automatic updates. You are far more likely to have your system compromised by missing or delaying an update than for these updates to impact your running system negatively.


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This looks to be a 32-bit binary (you can tell by the /lib/i386-linux-gnu in the ldd output). I think you have the issue figured out after installing 32bit libs and fixing file permissions, but for others who may have the same problem, see this Ubuntu guide on running i386 code on amd64.


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Yes, there is indeed a navicat.exe file there. Unfortunately they're basically just shipping a windows and wine setup, the start_navicat script should fire it up for you. You might need to open a terminal, navigate to that directory and then run ./start_navicat as I suspect the system won't recognise it as a shell script. There's no installation, afaik, ...


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Remove "destination" from the function arguments. From https://doc.powerdns.com/md/recursor/scripting/, preresolve() takes only three arguments preresolve ( remoteip, domain, qtype )



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