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5

You probably just want to use XFS. It's quite capable of what you're asking for, and does the job. There's no reason to complicate this with lesser-used filesystems, which can come with other tradeoffs. Please see: How does the number of subdirectories impact drive read / write performance on Linux? and The impact of a high directory-to-file ratio on XFS ...


3

You don't need paid TLS certificates for your own private communication. You can set up your own CA (with very long lasting certs, in case of compromise you just throw away the entire CA) and make your servers trust it, then you can issue as many certs as you want for different services. Paid certificates are only needed when you can't reliably make the ...


3

Based on that netstat output, and your sshd configuration file (especially this line) your SSH daemon is listening on a local-only IP address (127.0.0.1), and not an IP that actually communicates with your LAN or outbound via the router/gateway device on the network. Verify that your sshd_config is set to have a ListenAddress line that is on your LAN, such ...


2

You can set up port forwarding on the physical machine, so that some physical machine's port in physical network is forwarded to the VM SSH port. For example if the physical machine is 10.10.10.1 and VM network 192.168.0.0/24, then port forwards can be like this: 10.10.10.1 port 225 forwarded to 192.168.0.1 port 22 10.10.10.1 port 226 forwarded to ...


2

I would recommend that you check your logs (/var/log/*) for messages like "NCQ disabled due to excessive errors", this and similar messages (try to look for anything with "ata" in it too) indicate that you are having errors on your SATA links and these may cause Linux to disable NCQ and then you'll get a very bad performance. I've written a longer version a ...


2

Edit your SSH Server's config file to include ClientAliveInterval 600 ClientAliveCountMax 0 This will disconnect all idle clients after 10 minutes (600 seconds). Quoting the manual: ClientAliveCountMax Sets the number of client alive messages (see below) which may be sent without sshd(8) receiving any messages back from the client. If this ...


2

There are cloud solutions for this... And of course, old-school monitoring solutions that also calculate these percentages. OpenNMS does this quite well. Sample message: All services are down on node General - ppro. New Outage records have been created and service level availability calculations will be impacted until this outage is resolved.


1

You need to sync out the block cache after the mkswap command. Its explanation is the following. If you write data, but they aren't written out into the disk physically, they will be dirty pages. It means, that their content was created here, on your system, and wasn't read in from the hard disk. Thus you can't swap on dirty pages.


1

The problem is not adding the swap; the problem is your assumption that all swap space shows up in the output of df. Only partition-type data shows up in that, and as you're using in-system swapping, aka a swapfile, it doesn't show up. The swap space was activated by the first swapon you did; you were just looking in the wrong place to confirm that. The ...


1

I assume that you are using Apache to serve the files. I would recommend first finding out how long does it really take for Apache to serve those files. Here is a good article about that: http://www.ducea.com/2008/02/06/apache-logs-how-long-does-it-take-to-serve-a-request/ If indeed it takes long to serve the files, then I would start breaking it down and ...


1

rsync is a great tool for keeping files in sync. I would use it in combination with SSH (and public keys), like this: rsync -az -e ssh --delete /var/www otherserver:/var/www For multiple servers multiple uses of rsync might be the best option. Another option is pdcp -r, but that requires copying all the files every time instead of doing delta-transfers. ...


1

If your question is on how to best monitor your server during high peak times, which is hard to do when it is peaking, I'd look for some light-weight tool to help with monitoring. Top, ps, and df don't always cut it. I've used collectd to capture data points on my partitions, memory, cpu's, apache, mysql, and other things. It captures the data and saves ...


1

Ubuntu 14.04 Had to add both 'hard' and 'soft' entries in /etc/security/limits.conf for pam to recognize settings for rtprio (-r) and memlock (-l).


1

OK - so I figured it out finally. As @gnur suggests, xrdp is the thing to use, but not right out of the box. It appears that the XRDP that comes with Ubuntu is old(ish), so: XRDP must be built from source. Get the source here and follow the very nice manual here to get things in reasonably working order. Without this, session reconnection does not work ...


1

If it is read-only, why to not use a ISO file? You can use genisoimage or mkisofs. If you want to compress the whole thing, you can also use squashfs, another read-only filesystem with very high compression ratio.


1

Seeing the number of small files, I would consider using SquashFS. Especially if you have powerful enough CPU (meaning no Pentium III, or 1GHz ARM). Depending on the type of data stored, SquashFS can greatly reduce its size and thus the I/O when reading it. Only downside is CPU usage on read. On the other hand, any modern CPU can decompress at speeds far ...



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