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12

All IBM uEFI Machines take ages to boot, as after the eon-taking uEFI initialization and module startup the legacy BIOS emulation kicks in and the PCI-E option ROMs get executed etc. etc. This is "normal" on all IBM uEFI machines - no matter if blade or standard rack server. You could disable legacy BIOS boot, the option ROMs, optimize the boot order and ...


7

This is probably too late to be of any use to Massimo, but i thought i would mention that i managed to get this to work, admittedly through a somewhat forced procedure: Enable the LSI Logic SAS driver on the original server Copy the raw drive via dd from a Linux live CD Convert the GPT to a hybrid MBR/GPT using GPT fdisk Boot the VM from the Windows DVD ...


6

Firstly you mean GPT vs. MBR, not EFI vs. MBR - one's a firmware, the other a partition type. The only part it plays in your question is that, in general, you need an EFI/UEFI firmware based system (rather than a BIOS based one) to boot from a GPT partition, although that can be worked around sometimes. Anyway a few things, DON'T EVER USE RAID 0, seriously ...


6

In short, yes and no for a few different reasons. If Windows is booting from a GPT disk, it must be from UEFI. Windows boot manager and loader cannot boot to MBR disk from native UEFI. However, if the UEFI is configured for legacy BIOS boot mode then an MBR disk can be used for booting. This stems from the Windows boot mode (BIOS with MBR or UEFI with ...


6

From my understanding an EFI partition on a Linux server ensures a standard for the disk layout Ah, yeah. So you think laptops are super special? The EFI partition is part of the UEFI standard. Either you have an UEFI bios and use UEFI to boot, or you do not - and Laptop or Server is irrelevant. Let me quote from Wikipedia: It contains the boot ...


5

Microsoft won't let you achieve your step; so address your goal instead. Microsoft erroneously conflates has an EFI partitioned hard disc with has EFI firmware. This is, of course, clearly wrong. It's quite possible — and indeed is becoming ever more desirable these days — to have an EFI partitioned disc on a machine that has old non-EFI ...


5

UEFI shouldn't add any efficiencies all by itself, since BIOS and UEFI are there to bootstrap a system from bare CPU to an OS, and provide a translation layer between the OS and the hardware once things are booted. UEFI has a lot more capabilities in this regard. It is entirely possible that VMWare (and the other VM vendors) will develop a hypervisor that ...


4

Well, after much searching, experimentation, and general frustration, I have basically come to the conclusion that Hyper-V does not currently support UEFI guests, even if the Hyper-V server is running in UEFI configuration. This seems to be supported by the fact that that recent builds of Windows Blue have what they call "Generation 2" VM's that include ...


4

If you are getting to the EFI shell you likely already installed Ubuntu in EFI mode. The caveat I have found it that thought the OS installs fine using the grub-efi bootloader, an EFI boot entry for that boot loader is not written into the EFI variables correctly. This means the EFI firmware does not know how to load the boot loader and thus the OS and drops ...


4

EFI BC = EFI Byte Code. EFI Byte Code is a processor agnostic language for device drivers, PXE, and other EFI extensions so that the code can be written once and run on any supporting platform.


4

"Fixed" by commenting out the parts that use BIOS e801 and e820 maps. Not sure why the no-real-mode won't work. diff -ur orig/xen-4.0.1//xen/arch/x86/setup.c mod/xen-4.0.1//xen/arch/x86/setup.c --- orig/xen-4.0.1//xen/arch/x86/setup.c 2010-08-29 15:13:22.000000000 +0000 +++ mod/xen-4.0.1//xen/arch/x86/setup.c 2012-01-28 01:33:22.000000000 +0000 @@ ...


3

One simple method would be to simply perform a base install of Windows on a machine that doesn't support EFI, capture it with your image software and restore it to the real hardware. A good choice might be to build your base install in a VM. In earlier versions (ver < 6) of Windows didn't adapt well to be moved from one type of hardware to another. ...


3

dmidecode in linux is capable of pulling this information via EFI, there is a port available here http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/dmidecode.htm which appears to be compiled after EFI support. The command would dmidecode -s system-serial-number as tested on my BIOS based system, however I'm unable to test fully as I havn't got an EFI system to hand.


3

When you say "EFI-only partition table" I suspect you're talking about a GUID Partition Table (GPT). Per Microsoft, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 can boot from a GPT, provided you're running an x64 build in a system with UEFI firmware.


2

I agree the System X uEFI legacy implementation is so painfully slow, that I might even avoid selling them as a platform to my clients. Measuring the IBM form the time it starts a legacy USB key boot until I get an OS prompt is ridiculously long. I am using SmartOS (an illumos/opensolaris derivative for all intents an purposes once booted it runs and acts ...


2

I had just a similar problem. You could try IBM Serverguide v8.43. It worked well with SBS 2011 x64.


2

ELILO: EFI Linux Boot Loader is very easy to implement and meets some of the criteria: ☑ Menus ☐ Sub-menus ☑ Linux kernel/initrd TFTP load (naturally) ☐ Arbitrary EFI application load ☑ Fallthrough to next boot option (eventually I'll document what's required to get it working end-to-end…)


2

Take a look at this thread, particular the last post by BizCon Alex - http://communities.vmware.com/message/1695451 P2V conversion with EFI/GPT will be a nightmare unless someone comes out with a clean solution. EDIT: the other option is to use a commercial product such as DoubleTake Move (http://www.visionsolutions.com/Products/DT-Move.aspx). Replicate ...


2

Just adding more on EFI.. Like TomTom mentioned you either have BIOS or EFI (Extensible Firmware Interface) also called UEFI. When you use EFI based systems you use GPT partitions. GPT partitions can address a disk more than 2TB which MBR can not at the moment. This is one of the major reasons of using GPT partitions in EFI based systems. So when you ...


2

Hyper-V 2012 R2 generation 2 VM environments have UEFI firmware. See: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn282285.aspx http://blogs.technet.com/b/jhoward/archive/2013/10/24/hyper-v-generation-2-virtual-machines-part-1.aspx


2

If you installed the OS when UEFI was enabled, then your system disk uses a GUID Partition Table. BIOS can't boot from these partitions, and even if it could, your current system installation has no BIOS-compatible bootloader, so you would just be stuck on a black screen right after the BIOS if you disabled UEFI. If you still want to disable it, you'd have ...


2

CentOS 7 currently does not support running on Hyper-V Generation 2 virtual machines, as can be seen here. You have to recreate the VM and specify Generation 1 as the VM type. Linux Virtual Machines on Hyper-V provides a comprehensive list of which distributions are supported and any limitations associated with them. For a list of the differences between ...


1

It's probably due to the RAID adapter, Windows is able to use 3TB drives just fine. The real problem used to be booting from drives bigger than 2.2TB on non EFI systems


1

I'm not surprised that the installer only put GRUB on one drive's EFI partition. You'll need to copy the files to the other drives' EFI partitions yourself. You'll probably also want to use efibootmgr to create boot menu entries for those other copies of GRUB, so that you'll have them as options to boot from. (Each entry refers to a specific partition on ...


1

For the record, I recently had a similar problem with the same model server (x3250 M3), but it was for a custom linux distribution (untangle). I was able to boot from the DVD and begin the installer, but after that the installer was no longer able to access the DVD drive. To complete my installation, I had to then remove the DVD from the drive and insert it ...


1

It's talking about the Remote Boot Configuration Protocol (which is based on DHCP, hence the extended DHCP nomanclature). Unfortunately the draft died in 1999 and most PXE clients don't support it very well. I've never seen an OSS Server for it (though some proprietary deployment software does support it to varying levels). For more info you can check out ...


1

This Microsoft article covered exactly what you're looking for: How to create an ISO image for UEFI platforms for a Windows PE CD-ROM for Windows Server 2008 The instruction line that is fundamentally different for UEFI images is: oscdimg -m -o -u2 -udfver102 -bootdata:2#p0,e,bc:\winpe_x64\etfsboot.com#pEF,e,bc:\winpe_x64\efisys.bin c:\winpe_x64\ISO ...


1

I have exactly the same issue with an Asus P8P67 board and xen 4.1.2. The workaround posted above (slightly adjusted to match 4.1.2 source) also fixed it for now. But I am missing the background knowledge to understand if this will have any consequences/instabilities. So far no trouble observed.


1

You are not alone. This seems to be a bug with uefi and xen. No resolution thus far. xen-devel mailing list redhat bug


1

Try to execute: xm mem-set Domain-0 %MEMORY-AMOUNT-YOU-WISH% Basically Xen should boot Dom0 with memory amount it thinks is required for Dom0. You can change that by changing boot loader configuration and adding option: dom0_mem=8GB More info on this here



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