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My understanding here is that, given that these are connections from the parent to the child process, they’re merely Apache keeping track of what the children are doing. Bear in mind that: children can hang around for quite a while after they’ve processed a request the internal dummy connections occur regularly if the child hasn’t done anything else ...


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You can only do this on 64bit Solaris systems. The Solaris 10 newfs manpage has the example below for creating a multi-terabyte UFS filesystem. It looks like the same should work on Solaris 9 8/03 or later. You should look here for information on support and limitations of mutli-terabyte UFS filesystems. There is an example here on the Oracle site that ...


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To address a partition that is bigger than 2TB, you'll have to use EFI disk labels (instead of SMI). Remember Solaris doesn't boot from EFI disks yet, so your boot disk must use SMI and it can't be bigger than 2TB for that reason. Additional disks attached to your server can use EFI just fine. Solaris 10 (newfs, ufsdump, etc) has been updated to handle >2TB ...


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You're running the embedded version, which stays read-only mounted to not kill flash media with its limited write lifetime. You can mount to read write by running /etc/rc.conf_mount_rw and when finished, mount back to read only with /etc/rc.conf_mount_ro. If you're running on a hard drive or SSD you can run the full install version, which stays read-write ...


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Couple thoughts: There's no way to expand a BSD Slice to two physical locations on a disk (the new space on your disk is only at the end, slices that aren't at the end can't be expanded to that new space). I don't know of a tool that can move slices, but I'd be surprised if one didn't exist. You don't need var on a separate partition. The clunky old ...


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Not for this time but in the future would it be possible for you to create them in a separate file system? this would at least give you the option of just wiping the whole FS if that were appropriate.


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FreeBSD UFS2 and Solaris UFS, while sharing some original structure have somewhat diverged so I'm unsure freeBSD can mount it. Was your UFS file system properly unmounted ? EDIT: Also, if the file system was created on SPARC hardware, it won't be mountable on x86 as the format is architecture dependent.


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You won't be able to assign a drive letter in Windows as it it not a supported file system. The recovery utilities should be able to access the drive directly using the disk and partition number.


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Get the file names with ls -f or ls -U (if supported) to avoid having ls or your shell sort out the names. Just ls -f | egrep -v '\.|\.\.' | xargs rm -f. If this is a frequent necessity, you might want to write a small C utility to do it.


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From what I can find, UFS support seemed to be problematic and/or unreliable in Linux. Most of the articles I found were from years ago. You didn't say whether this was a USB drive or an actual hard disk, and one thing some recommended was to check your USB speed. Another option might be to use virtualization or a bootable disk to run a variant of FreeBSD, ...


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Are you currently running Solaris on a SPARC machine or an x86 based one ? In the latter case, there is no way to mount the filesystem on it as the format is architecture dependant.



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